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IEEE Software

Issue 4 • Date July 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • Managing Large Software Projects

    Publication Year: 1996
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2406 KB)

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  • Managing Megaprojects: A Free-Form Approach

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • A defined process for project post mortem review

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):65 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (57)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1179 KB)

    Most of us pay lip service to the need for software project post mortems, but the literature offers little guidance on how to conduct them. The authors propose a tentative, standard process for conducting post mortem reviews and describe activities, roles, and artifacts of the process. The success of the post mortem-or of any learning process-demands a context that makes organizational learning po... View full abstract»

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  • Why software reliability predictions fail

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):131 - 132
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (971 KB)

    Software reliability reflects a customer's view of the products we build and test, as it is usually measured in terms of failures experienced during regular system use. But our testing strategy is often based on early product measures, since we cannot measure failures until the software is placed in the field. The author shows us that such measurement is not effective at predicting the likely reli... View full abstract»

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  • Deep "C" Fishing [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contemporary Guide to Parallel Programming [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Another Yarn from the Great Storyweaver [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New Ada Constructs for Concurrent Programming [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Exploring Cryptic Text Algorithms [Bookshelf]

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):136 - 137
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Going global with user testing

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):129 - 130
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB)

    In Sweden, the automatic teller machines have very large buttons. The author hadn't noticed this particular design element on previous visits, which have usually been in warmer months. One year he was in Stockholm in February and immediately realized why the ATM buttons are so big: you can press them wearing thick gloves. Clearly, the ATM vendor had manufactured a localized version of the product ... View full abstract»

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  • Measuring reuse: a cautionary tale

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):118 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1736 KB)

    Many organizations look to reuse for large improvements in quality and productivity, but measuring reuse is difficult, to be attempted only after careful analysis of measurement and management goals. This article describes how to measure reuse and provides warnings on how some numbers can be misleading View full abstract»

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  • Large-scale project management is risk management

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):110 - 117
    Cited by:  Papers (30)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1084 KB)

    Because large-scale software projects increasingly affect the public good, the “normal science” paradigm is proving insufficient to model their complexity and potential consequences. The “postnormal science” paradigm offers a better fit, using a robust management approach predicated on a risk-taking ethic View full abstract»

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  • Selecting software subcontractors

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):104 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1052 KB)

    Large-scale software projects place special demands on the developing organization and can require much greater participation by outside companies. The authors describe their methods for selecting subcontractors for a large project in which outside companies are supplying 90 percent of the code View full abstract»

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  • Industrial-strength management strategies

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):94 - 103
    Cited by:  Papers (26)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1568 KB)

    As our industry undertakes ever larger development projects, the number of defects occurring in delivered software increases exponentially. Drawing on his experiences in the defense industry, the author offers nine best practices to improve the management of large software systems: (1) risk management; (2) agreement on interfaces; (3) formal inspections; (4) metrics-based scheduling and management... View full abstract»

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  • Enrollment management: managing the Alpha AXP program

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):53 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1292 KB)

    The article describes an innovative program management methodology created at Digital Equipment Corporation during the development of the Alpha AXP program. Successful execution of the Alpha program was crucial to the company's future, but early projected schedules showed the product wouldn't be completed until a year after the competitive window closed. The author, who served as Alpha program man... View full abstract»

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  • Implementing accountability [in software development]

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):83 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1540 KB)

    The author shows how, through the use of an accountability model and its attendant management practices, a software development team can, by its own initiative, establish an interaction with its stakeholders through which it obtains resources, directions, assistance and clarification of expectations View full abstract»

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  • Managing megaprojects: a focused approach

    Publication Year: 1996
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB)

    In mid 1990, we began work on software for the Boeing 777 aircraft, a project that would involve 30 suppliers and require 9 million person hours to complete. The various systems in the 777, most of which are digitally controlled, required that we develop, test, and certify about 2.5 million lines of new software, mostly as Ada code, and incorporate about 1.6 million lines of commercial off the she... View full abstract»

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  • The slippery path to productivity improvement

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):43 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1836 KB)

    Productivity tools simply aren't delivering increased productivity even when a project is managed “by the book”. It is demonstrated that there may be more systemic, albeit counterintuitive, causes for the “productivity paradox”. Specifically, the productivity potential of software engineering tools may be squandered not because organizations fail to institute the necessary ... View full abstract»

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  • Are developers morally challenged?

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):20, 22, 25 - 27
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB)

    Having recently concluded another sordid software development affair, the author is again pondering a question: do computer programmers have ethics or morals? Time and time again he has seen an investment lost, a deal disrupted, or a business destroyed because a programmer acted without regard to fairness or legal rights. Does this conduct reflect a shortcoming in the character of computer program... View full abstract»

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  • Anchoring the software process

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):73 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (70)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2348 KB)

    Software organizations need common milestones to serve as a basis for their software development processes. The author proposes three such milestones, gives an example of their use, and discusses why they are success-critical for software projects. To avoid the problems of the previous model milestones-stakeholder mismatches, gold plating, inflexible point solutions, high risk downstream capabilit... View full abstract»

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  • Beyond blaming: congruence in large systems development projects

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):33 - 42
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB)

    As early as 1852, Charles Babbage could see symptoms of decay and infer from them a vision of future performance. In so doing he provides a perfect description of the blaming style of communication that emerges in “decaying” organizations-be they nations or software engineering organizations. What is a blaming style of communication, and why is it important in systems development? In o... View full abstract»

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  • Project management: filling in the gaps

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):17 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)

    Software configuration management offers a software project manager the one thing he or she desires most: control. This is what is called a “blocking and tackling” issue: it rarely makes headlines, but without it, a software project be thrown for big losses. The author argues that managers (like football coaches) ignore “blocking and tackling” at their peril View full abstract»

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Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
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