By Topic

Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date June 1996

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Guest Editorial Introduction to the Special Section

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A framework for evaluating specification methods for reactive systems-experience report

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 378 - 389
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1316 KB)  

    Numerous formal specification methods for reactive systems have been proposed in the literature. Because the significant differences between the methods are hard to determine, choosing the best method for a particular application can be difficult. We have applied several different methods, including Modechart, VFSM, ESTEREL, Basic LOTOS, Z, SDL, and C, to an application problem encountered in the design of software for AT&T's 5ESS telephone switching system. We have developed a set of criteria for evaluating and comparing the different specification methods. We argue that the evaluation of a method must take into account not only academic concerns, but also the maturity of the method, its compatibility with the existing software development process and system execution environment, and its suitability for the chosen application domain View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Supporting search for reusable software objects

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 407 - 423
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1688 KB)  

    Prior research has shown that achieving high levels of software reuse in the presence of repository and object-based computer-aided software engineering (CASE) development methods presents interesting human, managerial and technical challenges. This article presents research that seeks to enhanced software development performance through reuse. We propose automated support for developers who search large repositories for the appropriate reusable software objects. We characterize search for repository objects in terms of a multistage model involving screening, identification, and the subsequent choice between new object construction or reusable object implementation. We propose automated support tools, including ORCA, a software Object Reuse Classification Analyzer, and AMHYRST, an Automated HYpertext-based Reuse Search Tool, that are based on this model. ORCA utilizes a faceted classification approach that can be implemented using hypertext. We also describe an aspect of AMHYRST's architecture which can automatically create hypertext networks that represent and link objects in terms of a number of distinguishing features. We illustrate our approach with an example drawn from a real world object repository View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Identification of dynamic comprehension processes during large scale maintenance

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 424 - 437
    Cited by:  Papers (54)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1292 KB)  

    We present results of observing professional maintenance engineers working with industrial code at actual maintenance tasks. Protocol analysis is used to explore how code understanding might differ for small versus large scale code. The experiment confirms that cognition processes work at all levels of abstraction simultaneously as programmers build a mental model of the code. Analysis focused on dynamic properties and processes of code understanding. Cognition processes emerged at three levels of aggregation representing lower and higher level strategies of understanding. They show differences in what triggers them and how they achieve their goals. Results are useful for defining information which maintenance engineers need for their work and for documentation and development standards View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A component- and message-based architectural style for GUI software

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 390 - 406
    Cited by:  Papers (102)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2040 KB)  

    While a large fraction of application code is devoted to graphical user interface (GUI) functions, support for reuse in this domain has largely been confined to the creation of GUI toolkits (“widgets”). We present a novel architectural style directed at supporting larger grain reuse and flexible system composition. Moreover, the style supports design of distributed, concurrent applications. Asynchronous notification messages and asynchronous request messages are the sole basis for intercomponent communication. A key aspect of the style is that components are not built with any dependencies on what typically would be considered lower-level components, such as user interface toolkits. Indeed, all components are oblivious to the existence of any components to which notification messages are sent. While our focus has been on applications involving graphical user interfaces, the style has the potential for broader applicability. Several trial applications using the style are described View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Completeness and consistency in hierarchical state-based requirements

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 363 - 377
    Cited by:  Papers (87)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1472 KB)  

    This paper describes methods for automatically analyzing formal, state-based requirements specifications for some aspects of completeness and consistency. The approach uses a low-level functional formalism, simplifying the analysis process. State-space explosion problems are eliminated by applying the analysis at a high level of abstraction; i.e., instead of generating a reachability graph for analysis, the analysis is performed directly on the model. The method scales up to large systems by decomposing the specification into smaller, analyzable parts and then using functional composition rules to ensure that verified properties hold for the entire specification. The analysis algorithms and tools have been validated on TCAS II, a complex, airborne, collision-avoidance system required on all commercial aircraft with more than 30 passengers that fly in U.S. Airspace View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org