By Topic

Mechatronics, IEEE/ASME Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1996

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Guest Editorial

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Ten years of mechatronic research and industrial applications in Finland

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 103 - 105
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (283 KB)  

    A mechatronics research program was carried out in Finland from 1987 to 1990 as a joint project between industry and research centers. The program stimulated cooperation between these partners and supported the companies' own R&D projects. It also encouraged individuals in companies, together with research centers, to contemplate future possibilities in an innovative, interdisciplinary way and in teams. This resulted in new product concepts, and new collaborative applied research activities and programs with new goals. This work has been continued in several new technology programs, especially in applications of learning and intelligent systems which will be carried out from 1995 to 1998. The rapid progress of technology gives continuously new possibilities to meet the needs of customers. Soft computing with a control of nonlinearities is the new wave in making dramatic improvements in product and process performances. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechatronics in the Netherlands

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 106 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB)  

    This article assesses the present situation of mechatronics in the Netherlands. After a short historical survey, it describes the postgraduate "mechatronic designer course", introduced in 1991. It deals with the principles of this course and how these principles have been implemented. Also, the activities of the Dutch government in cooperation with the industrial mechatronics community to enhance the awareness of mechatronics, especially directed toward small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechatronics design for product enhancement

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 111 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1431 KB)  

    Mechatronics and its development in the UK are discussed, with particular reference to applications-oriented research. The educational requirements for mechatronics are analyzed, and a description is given of how they have been addressed in the UK. Various examples are given of professional and company issues which have arisen as a consequence of mechatronic developments in the UK. Examples of mechatronics research from a number of academic and industrial groups and organizations in the UK are provided, including some examples from the authors' own work. Finally, some limitations and future trends in the direction and development of UK mechatronics are considered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechatronics for the design of human-oriented machines

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 120 - 126
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1099 KB)  

    One of the topics of mechatronics is the design of "intelligent" machines, thus making them different from previous ones and allowing more sophisticated cooperation between humans and machines. Such machines are expected to emulate human skills and to communicate and interact with their human users on an appropriate level. The requirements for such human-oriented machines and the implications on their design will be discussed here. A number of examples from actual Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) research, ranging from nanomanipulation tasks and medical devices to a mobile service robot, demonstrate the application of the concept. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechatronics-a powerful concurrent engineering framework

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 127 - 136
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1372 KB)  

    Mechatronics is emerging as a concurrent-engineering thinking framework in the process of designing complex machines. It is argued that mechatronics can be defined as the science of motion control. The different steps in the evolution from smart machines to intelligent autonomous systems are discussed and illustrated with many examples, mainly taken from the author's research experience. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Micromechatronics in medicine

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 137 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2208 KB)  

    Micromechatronic systems integrate miniature precision mechanisms, actuators, sensors, and embedded control. They are suitable for application in the medical field particularly when miniaturization, reliability, and intimate interaction with the human body are required. Medical applications not only motivate the miniaturization of mechatronic systems, but also encourage the development of novel concepts and technologies for the integration of artificial and biological components into "hybrid" micromechatronic systems, thus giving origin to a new and intriguing field of research and application known as "biomechatronics". Micromechatronic devices can be exploited for acute intervention or for permanent (short- and long-term) implant in the human body. This paper presents many examples of both types of devices being developed in our laboratory, and discusses their associated open problems. Application fields include sensory substitution, internal organs substitution, neural prosthetics, and minimally invasive surgery. Most of the projects are performed in collaboration with other European research groups and industries and supported by programs by the European Union. The conclusion of our analysis is that medical applications of micromechatronics may have tremendous impact on the quality of medical care and may become a very attractive industrial market, provided that some critical technical problems are addressed and solved. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mechatronics for a new robot generation

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 149 - 157
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2193 KB)  

    The paper outlines the DLR's mechatronic developments in the robotics area over the last five years. They aim at designing a new multisensory, modularly configurable lightweight robot generation in a unified and integral way. A first step in this direction has been the development of a complex multisensory gripper. It turned out to be a key element in ROTEX, the first real robot in space that flew with shuttle Columbia in early 1993. Sensors and actuators in DLR's new ultra-lightweight robot show up miniaturized integration of mechanics, electronics, and microprocessor control. Joint torque control based on inductive sensing is realized in the compact, highly reducing rotational gearings. With optimized carbon-fiber grid structures, optical high-speed information transfer between the joints and all power and signal electronics integrated into the arm, a new extremely lightweight type of robot arises. Joint control concepts are outlined and a 7 degree-of-freedom version of such a lightweight arm is described. The paper also outlines the concept of the artificial muscle and its use in the fingers of a new modular articulated robot hand. Sensor-based man-machine interfaces and automatic camera guidance by robots in minimal invasive surgery are other topics covered in the paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Grasping with hydraulic fingers-an example of mechatronics

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 158 - 167
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1247 KB)  

    Grasping, regrasping, and manipulation with an artificial hand being composed of several fingers require control strategies to assure reasonable cooperation of the fingers with respect to an object. This paper presents such concepts. They are verified by a hand with four hydraulic fingers, which together with control and power electronics, represent a typical mechatronic system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Another language for describing motions of mechatronics systems: a nonlinear position-dependent circuit theory

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 168 - 180
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1152 KB)  

    Dynamics and control of nonlinear mechanical systems and advanced mechatronic systems can be investigated more vividly and efficiently by using corresponding nonlinear position-dependent circuits that describe Lagrange's equations of motions and interactions with objects or/and task environments. Such expressions of Lagrange's equations via nonlinear circuits are indebted to lumped-parameter discretization of mechanical systems as a set of rigid bodies through equations of motion due to Newton's second law. This observation is quite analogous to validity of electric circuits that can be derived as lumped parameter versions of Maxwell's equations of electromagnetic waves. Couplings of nonlinear mechanical circuits with electrical circuits through actuator dynamics are also discussed. In such electromechanical circuits the passivity should be a generalization of impedance concept in order to cope with general nonlinear position-dependent circuits and play a crucial role in their related motion control problems. In particular, it is shown that the passivity as an input-output property gives rise to a necessary and sufficient characterization of H-tuning for disturbance attenuation of robotic systems, which can give another system theoretic interpretation of the energy conservation law. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Robust tracking control of mechatronic arms

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 181 - 188
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (822 KB)  

    A robust tracking control scheme based on variable structure systems (VSS) theory is presented to cope with the uncertainties and parameter variations in mechatronic arm dynamics. A modification of VSS is used to remove its restrictions with regard to chattering and required control efforts. By blending VSS with a self-organizing controller (SOC), a sliding mode self-organizing controller (SLIMSOC)scheme has been developed. In this scheme, both control actions and performance evaluation are executed using the distance from the desired sliding surface and rate of approach to it. Comparisons are drawn and it is shown that the inherent robustness properties of variable structure systems are retained while the undesirable chatter motion of the sliding mode is eliminated. The results are illustrated by applications of SLIMSOC on a direct drive SCARA type of robot. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics encompasses all practical aspects of the theory and methods of mechatronics, the synergetic integration of mechanical engineering with electronic and intelligent computer control in the design and manufacture of industrial products and processes.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Okyay Kaynak
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Bogazici University
34342 Istanbul, Turkey
okyay.kaynak@boun.edu.tr