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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Technology and Strategy: Conceptual Models and Diagnostics - Richard A. Goodman and Michael W. Lawles

    Publication Year: 1996
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  • Managing Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Technology Based Firms - Michael J. C. Martin [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Wiorld Class - Rosabeth Moss Kanter [Book Reviews]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Issue on Concurrent Engineering - Guest Editorial

    Publication Year: 1996
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
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  • Involving suppliers in product development in the United States and Japan: evidence for set-based concurrent engineering

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 165 - 178
    Cited by:  Papers (45)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1576 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering (CE) involves a widely recognized revolution in the social organization of product development and a corresponding revolution in the underlying paradigm of design. We distinguish between two paradigms-point-based design and set-based design-and argue that effective, truly concurrent design requires shifting to a paradigm where design team members reason and communicate about sets of designs which we call “set-based concurrent engineering”. A survey of 92 Japanese and 119 US automotive parts suppliers who design their own products sought to quantify the pervasiveness and correlates of “set-based approaches”. The survey evidence indicates that set-based design communication is more prevalent among Japanese than among US parts suppliers, and is correlated with certain product development characteristics including years of experience with early involvement of suppliers in design, the degree of product-process design overlap, the degree to which subsystems are interdependent, and the use of quality function deployment (QFD) View full abstract»

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  • Composite forms of organization as a strategy for concurrent engineering effectiveness

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 133 - 142
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
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    This paper proposes a “composite” form of organization as best for reducing product development time and costs. This composite is a meld of three sets of concurrent engineering (CE) practices: early simultaneous influence (ESI) in product design decisions by multiple functions, in-process design controls (IDC), and computer and information technology (CIT). The importance of these practices was suggested by case studies of CE practices in 12 major US companies. The separate and interaction effects of each of these three practices is tested statistically using data from a survey sample of 74 companies. The results show statistically significant interaction effects among the three core CE practice sets. This suggests synergistic benefits from simultaneously achieving high levels of these three practices View full abstract»

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  • The influence of process concurrency on project outcomes in product development: an empirical study of cross-functional teams

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 153 - 164
    Cited by:  Papers (47)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1264 KB)  

    This study examines the practice of concurrent engineering (CE) in terms of process concurrency, and the impact of concurrency on success of product development projects. The study is based on 50 cross-national projects from companies in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, United Kingdom, and the United States in the aerospace, automobile, chemical, computer, electronics, shipbuilding, and telecommunications industries. Four dimensions of process and behaviors of engineering/R&D and manufacturing members of cross-functional product development teams were reliably operationalized: (1) two-way communication, (2) overlapping problem solving, (3) readiness to make decisions on the basis of uncertain and ambiguous information, and (4) readiness to release uncertain and ambiguous information. These dimensions of process concurrency were found to be reliable predictors of development projects' success, as measured by product cost and quality, project schedule and budget performance, and project team satisfaction. The paper offers implications for theory and practice and models of CE management for future research View full abstract»

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  • Operationalizing the concept of concurrent engineering: a case study from the US auto industry

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 124 - 132
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
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    This paper presents the results of case study research conducted at a major US automotive firm. Four waves of qualitative data were collected to identify the organizational and technological changes needed to implement concurrent engineering practices. The desire to cut product development time was the driving factor in a strategy designed to boost sales and market share. The company was successful in shortening concept-to-market time by over one year on its first newly designed vehicle, primarily through the use of product-focused, cross-functional platform teams which permitted the early integration of manufacturing personnel into product and process development. While technology played an important role in this transformation, organizational, and human resource changes were the greatest enablers View full abstract»

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  • The effect of acceleration techniques on product development time

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 143 - 152
    Cited by:  Papers (65)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1184 KB)  

    Bringing new products to the marketplace faster has become a strategic imperative in many markets, especially high technology industries. Much attention has focused on techniques purported to bring products to the market more quickly, but little empirical research has been conducted to validate these techniques. This study tests the relationship between the popular time to market acceleration techniques and product development time in a sample of electronics companies. Our findings suggest that only four of the 12 techniques we studied are significantly related with development time performance as proposed. We found that fast developers had teams that were cross functional, dedicated, included fast time to market as a development goal, and overlapped development activities more so than slow developers. Our regression results were very significant, and accounted for 32% of the variance in development time performance. We concluded, however, given many of techniques were not supported that successful fast cycle development can not be accomplished by using a sporadic combination of factors. Furthermore, we feel additional research is needed to explore the interaction and mediating effects of these techniques upon each other, as well as identify other intermediate processes and external conditions that may also affect product development effectiveness View full abstract»

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  • Multiobjective concurrent engineering: a goal programming approach

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 202 - 209
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (676 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering (CE) is a commonly used engineering/management technique for product development. Multiple and sometimes conflicting objectives can be experienced when using CE as an aid in new product development. One management science technique that commonly used to analyze multiple objectives in a decision making environment is goal programming (GP). In this paper, the authors demonstrate how goal programming can be used to enhance CE and improve decision making by considering conflicting objective criteria of cost and time. The procedure by which CE problems can be modeled using GP is presented along with an illustrative example from the literature. Results from a real-world ongoing study are also reported View full abstract»

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  • Managing the simultaneous execution of coupled phases in concurrent product development

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 210 - 217
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (892 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering (CE) calls for the simultaneous execution of coupled product development phases. One approach to simultaneous execution involves performing a downstream information absorbing product development phase concurrently with an information supplying upstream phase. However, such simultaneous execution of coupled phases, in the absence of careful management, can lead to substantial deterioration in the product development performance. In this paper, the author presents the managerial implications of a model-based framework to manage the risks involving the simultaneous execution of coupled development phases. He describes how the framework would apply to an automobile instrument panel development process, and discusses the changes in organizational perspective required for successful simultaneous product development View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent engineering tools: are the human issues being ignored?

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 189 - 201
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1508 KB)  

    Concurrent engineering (CE) tools are intended to increase the concurrency of multidisciplinary design by integrating various enabling technologies such as computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, group decision support systems, expert systems, and communication networks. If the long term viability of CE depends on effectively developing and deploying CE tools, the assumptions about how CE design tasks are most successfully performed and the roles of tools in facilitating that work should be carefully reviewed. This paper identifies the human factors assumptions made by the CE tool development community and compares them to conclusions drawn from existing literature on the role of technologies in performing technical work. This comparison suggests that the assumptions made by the CE tool development community are likely to inhibit CE tools from successfully enabling the CE process. Recommendations for remedying this state of affairs are offered in the form of restated assumptions that are consistent with documented behaviors of people using similar technologies and potential development strategies for CE tool developers View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent software engineering: prospects and pitfalls

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 179 - 188
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB)  

    Software development remains largely a sequential, time-consuming process. Concurrent engineering (CE) principles have been more widely adopted and with greater success in hardware development. In this paper, a methodology for marrying CE principles to software engineering, or concurrent software engineering (CSE), is proposed. CSE is defined as a management technique to reduce the time-to-market in product development through simultaneous performance of activities and processing of information. A hierarchy of concurrent software development activity is defined, ranging from the simplest (within stage) to the most complex (across products and platforms). The information support activities to support this activity hierarchy are also defined, along with two key linking concepts-synchronicity and architectural modularity. Principles of CSE are developed for each level in the activity hierarchy. Research findings that establish limitations to implementing CE are also discussed View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas