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Network, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Enterprise Networking: Strategies and Transport Protocols [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • International Telecommunications Handbook [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IPv6: The New Internet Protocol [ New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Managing Client/Server Environments: Tools and Strategies for Building Solutions [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Practical DCE Programming [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (285 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Internet Watchdog [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (137 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Open Distributed Systems [New Books]

    Publication Year: 1996
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A 622 Mb/s LAN/WAN gateway and experiences with wide area ATM networking

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 40 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1220 KB)  

    The use of similar technology in local and wide area networks enables geographically distributed high-performance applications. Key elements in achieving high performance are the appropriate use of traffic control and the development of efficient gateways between LANs and WANs. Even though the basic technology used on both sides of a gateway may be similar, the operational aspects of these elements are significantly different. A gateway has been developed and implemented not only to support communications between an ATM LAN and WAN at 622 Mb/s, but also to provide a platform for conducting network control and traffic research. In addition, the performance of the MAGIC WAN was evaluated, and bottlenecks were identified and analyzed. Techniques were developed and implemented, specifically ATM cell-level pacing, to eliminate these bottlenecks. Throughput performance close to the theoretical maximum was demonstrated. This article describes experiences with ATM over a WAN and how the gateway was developed, implemented, and evaluated. The results included show how high-speed LAN/WAN internetworking can be achieved and applied in many environments as appropriate control techniques and interfaces become ubiquitous View full abstract»

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  • Performance analysis in high-speed wide area IP-over-ATM network: top-to-bottom end-to-end monitoring

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 26 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1836 KB)  

    We describe an approach to the analysis of the performance of distributed applications in high-speed wide area networks. The approach is designed to identify all of the issues that impact performance, and isolate the causes due to the related hardware and software components. We also describe the use of a distributed parallel data server as a network load generator that can be used in conjunction with this approach to probe various aspects of high-speed distributed systems from top to bottom of the protocol stack and from end to end in the network. To demonstrate the utility of this approach we present the analysis of a TCP-over-ATM problem that was uncovered while developing this methodology. This work was done in conjunction with the ARPA-funded MAGIC gigabit testbed View full abstract»

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  • The MAGlC project: from vision to reality

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 15 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1884 KB)  

    In the MAGIC project, three major components-an ATM internetwork, a distributed, network-based storage system; and a terrain visualization application-were designed, implemented, and integrated to create a testbed for demonstrating real-time, interactive exchange of data at high speeds distributed resources. The MAGIC internetwork, depicted includes six high-speed local area networks (LANs) interconnected by a wide area network (WAN) backbone. The testbed was developed as a system, with special consideration to how performance was affected by interactions among the components. This article presents an overview of the project, with emphasis on the challenges associated with implementing complex distributed system, and with coordinating a multi-organization collaborative project that relied on distributed development. System level design issues and performance measurements are described, as it is a tool that was developed for analyzing performance and diagnosing problems in a distributed system. The management challenges that were encountered and some of the lessons learned during the course of the three-year project are discussed, and a brief summary of MAGIC-II, a follow-on project, is given View full abstract»

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  • A service architecture for ATM: from applications to scheduling

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 6 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1092 KB)  

    This article derives a rationale for the service architecture of the ATM Forum's Traffic Management 4.0 specification. This model distinguishes a small number of general ways to provide quality of service (QoS) which are appropriate for different classes of applications. We construct the set of ATM service categories by first analyzing the QoS and traffic requirements for a reasonably comprehensive list of applications. The most important application properties and the complexity of the related network mechanisms are used to structure the services. This method has the desirable property that the number of service categories does not expand rapidly with the introduction of new applications. We also discuss packet scheduling as the key component for realizing such a set of services, and report on an experimental realization of a fair queuing scheduler View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo