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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Mar 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • Evaluating deadlock detection methods for concurrent software

    Page(s): 161 - 180
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2260 KB)  

    Static analysis of concurrent programs has been hindered by the well-known state explosion problem. Although many different techniques have been proposed to combat this state explosion, there is little empirical data comparing the performance of the methods. This information is essential for assessing the practical value of a technique and for choosing the best method for a particular problem. In this paper, we carry out an evaluation of three techniques for combating the state explosion problem in deadlock detection: reachability searching with a partial-order state-space reduction, symbolic model checking and inequality-necessary conditions. We justify the method used for the comparison, and carefully analyze several sources of potential bias. The results of our evaluation provide valuable data on the kinds of programs to which each technique might best be applied. Furthermore, we believe that the methodological issues we discuss are of general significance in comparison of analysis techniques View full abstract»

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  • A binary Markov process model for random testing

    Page(s): 218 - 223
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    A binary Markov process model is proposed for the random testing of software. This model is suggested for replacing the standard binomial distribution model, which is based on the easily-violated assumption of test runs being statistically independent of each other. In addition to a general result on the probability of having any specific number of software failures during testing, practical implications of the new model are also discussed. In particular, we demonstrate that, in general, the effect of a possible correlation between test runs cannot be ignored in estimating software reliability View full abstract»

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  • A query algebra for program databases

    Page(s): 202 - 217
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    Querying source code is an essential aspect of a variety of software engineering tasks such as program understanding, reverse engineering, program structure analysis and program flow analysis. In this paper, we present and demonstrate the use of an algebraic source code query technique that blends expressive power with query compactness. The query framework of Source Code Algebra (SCA) permits users to express complex source code queries and views as algebraic expressions. Queries are expressed on an extensible, object-oriented database that stores program source code. The SCA algebraic approach offers multiple benefits such as an applicative query language, high expressive power, seamless handling of structural and flow information, clean formalism and potential for query optimization. We present a case study where SCA expressions are used to query a program in terms of program organization, resource flow, control flow, metrics and syntactic structure. Our experience with an SCA-based prototype query processor indicates that an algebraic approach to source code queries combines the benefits of expressive power and compact query formulation View full abstract»

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  • Automatic symbolic verification of embedded systems

    Page(s): 181 - 201
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2112 KB)  

    Presents a model-checking procedure and its implementation for the automatic verification of embedded systems. The system components are described as hybrid automata-communicating machines with finite control and real-valued variables that represent continuous environment parameters such as time, pressure and temperature. The system requirements are specified in a temporal logic with stop-watches, and verified by symbolic fixpoint computation. The verification procedure-implemented in the Cornell Hybrid Technology tool, HyTech-applies to hybrid automata whose continuous dynamics is governed by linear constraints on the variables and their derivatives. We illustrate the method and the tool by checking safety, liveness, time-bounded and duration requirements of digital controllers, schedulers and distributed algorithms View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org