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Engineering Science and Education Journal

Issue 1 • Date Feb 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
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  • Sound transmission through normal and diseased human lungs

    Page(s): 25 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (892 KB)  

    A system for monitoring sound transmission through the human lung is described and the possibility of using this information in order to construct a functional map of the lung is investigated. Lung morphology (structure) may be monitored by using X-rays or computerised axial tomography (CAT). However, the size, cost and the possible adverse effects of high doses of X-rays make these techniques unsuitable for routine use. The speed of sound transmission through parenchyma (lung tissue) is a function of the size of the alveoli (air sacs). Therefore, by measuring the speed of sound through the lungs it may be possible to detect areas of collapsed alveoli. This would provide a simple, cheap, and non-invasive technique for monitoring certain lung abnormalities View full abstract»

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  • The great transition: the role of engineering in a change of phase

    Page(s): 11 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB)  

    This paper, drawing on earlier studies of the historical dynamics in which mankind has evolved, examines the effect of network development on popular expectations and attitudes. It suggests that this mechanism, the greatest of all human artefacts, is being incorporated in our collective identity, and that engineers, who have always carefully balanced technological skills and social considerations, should now recognise their critical role in a period of profound but turbulent transition View full abstract»

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  • High-energy pulsed-power conditioning and switching for flux-compression generators

    Page(s): 17 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1212 KB)  

    Devices based on the flux-compression process provide extremely effective and inexpensive alternatives to the capacitor bank as a means of generating high-current and high-energy pulses. The energy is however released at too slow a rate for many applications and, when a fast-rising current is to be driven through a high-impedance load, one or more stages of pulse sharpening are necessary between the compressor and the load. After examining the concepts that are involved in the magnetic energy transfer process, this article describes typical opening and closing switches for use in each stage of the conditioning View full abstract»

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  • The adoption of application-specific IC technology by the UK manufacturing base

    Page(s): 5 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  

    In spite of continued marketing by semiconductor companies, distributors and design houses, the uptake of application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) technology in the UK continues to lag behind that of its leading competitor nations. The reasons for this slow uptake are reviewed with reference to a number of surveys performed by the author and others. The author proposes a model for technology transfer that would be likely to increase the level of adoption and reviews the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) `Microelectronics in Business' initiative in this light View full abstract»

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  • Learning about digital signal processing using spreadsheets and simulation software

    Page(s): 41 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (748 KB)  

    The ready availability of low-cost high-speed digital signal processor chips has resulted in their widespread use in many areas of industrial and consumer electronics for processes such as filtering, coding, estimation and spectral analysis. This article explores the opportunities of learning about digital signal processing (DSP) using a spreadsheet and a specialized simulation software package, developed by Texas Instruments for their TMS320C25 processor, that mimics the device in terms of its functional capabilities. A finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter is used as a typical example to demonstrate the ideas presented. Application programs can thus be entirely tested in a software environment before being used on a real-time target system View full abstract»

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  • A progressive introduction of computer-assistance into the teaching of advanced topics in control engineering

    Page(s): 32 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (804 KB)  

    The paper describes the use of computer-assistance in the teaching of a number of areas of control engineering. The use of computer-assistance is fairly common in all the areas described, but the material has been carefully selected to illustrate a progression in the use of computer-assistance, from an area where it is desirable and helpful to an area where it is indispensable. This provides a guide as to a progressive approach to the introduction of computer-assistance into other subject areas. There are several engineering topics taught at advanced undergraduate (or postgraduate) level in which students typically find it difficult to relate theory to practice. The widespread use of very high level computing languages provides the opportunity to carry out computer-assisted designs and generate easily-run simulations. This greatly eases this aspect of learning and allows the student to experiment with `what if' scenarios. The paper reports some aspects of the use of MATLAB and SIMULINK (as a representative very high level environment) in the teaching of digital control, optimal control, Kalman filtering and multivariable-frequency domain control. In addition, a fully self-contained computer-based-learning package for multivariable-frequency domain analysis and design, using MATLAB, is briefly described View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The Engineering Science and Education Journal was published by the IET between 1992 and 2002.

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