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Rehabilitation Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Mar 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • A Holter-type microprocessor-based rehabilitation instrument for acquisition and storage of plantar pressure data in children with cerebral palsy

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 33 - 38
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (632 KB)  

    A multichannel, portable data acquisition system has been developed to measure discrete plantar pressures in the rehabilitation of children who have cerebral palsy and planovalgus foot deformity. The microprocessor-based system is designed to be lightweight (350 g with batteries) and portable (no umbilicus) in order to minimize encumbrances to gait patterns. It provides an improved method for obtaining accurate and reliable data during extended recording and rehabilitative periods that is not available from commercial systems. Twelve conductive polymer force (pressure) sensors are used to acquire pressure data, which are then stored in the system memory. Plantar pressures are sampled at a rate of 40 Hz from each of the 12 sensors for up to 2 h. The system consists of 16 analog amplifiers, a 12 b sampling analog-to-digital converter, an 8 b Dallas semiconductor microprocessor (DS5001FP-16, Dallas, TX), 4 MB of pseudo static RAM, and serial and parallel I/O interfaces. The interfaces are used to upload data into a PC for further processing, analysis, and display. During subject testing, sensors are located at predetermined anatomic areas under the calcaneus, medial and lateral midfoot, medial and lateral metatarsal heads, and hallux. Foot pressure data has been acquired from two pediatric subjects during multiple walking trials to illustrate system application in the normal and planovalgus foot. The system is considered to be appropriate for further clinical application and for characterization of event related alterations including rehabilitative, therapeutic, surgical, and nonsurgical treatment View full abstract»

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  • Ventilatory assistance using electrical stimulation of abdominal muscles

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 1 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB)  

    Nine neurologically intact subjects were studied to demonstrate the feasibility of stimulating the muscles of expiration during, and in synchrony with, naturally occurring breathing. A breath-by-breath analysis showed that both tidal volume and the frequency of respiration could be increased during periods of electrical stimulation. A single subject with complete spinal cord injury was studied to eliminate the possibility that the results from the normal subjects could be attributed entirely to either subconscious or conscious volitional response to the stimulation. The results provide a basis for future studies with patients in borderline ventilatory failure View full abstract»

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  • Stimulator design and subsequent stimulation parameter optimization for controlling micturition and reducing urethral resistance

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 39 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (972 KB)  

    An implantable computerized electrical stimulation system designed to induce bladder evacuation in animal models (dogs) after spinal cord transection has been realized and evaluated. This fully programmable system is based on a handheld device and generates a wide range of stimuli through a multichannel implantable miniaturized stimulator. Using the new bladder stimulator and inducing reversible fatigue to the external sphincter via the pudendal nerve enables one to reduce the bladder outlet resistance, resulting in the proper emptying of the bladder during stimulation without the need for sacral nerve rhizotomies and the pudendal nerve neurectomies. Four chronically affected dogs were studied to determine the optimal stimulation parameters for inducing a sphincter fatigue that would reliably empty the bladder for the duration of the experiment. These parameters were: maximum amplitude of 1.5 mA±0.5 SD, stimuli composed of a high frequency signal of 200 Hz±50 SD modulated by a low frequency signal of 10 Hz±5 SD, pulse width controlled by a duty-cycle of 20%±10 SD, sacral nerve stimulation of 50 s±25 SD and fatiguing duration of 20 s±5 SD View full abstract»

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  • Mobile robotics and mobility assistance for people with motor impairments: rational justification for the VAHM project

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 7 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (748 KB)  

    The VAHM project aims to improve the control of powered wheelchairs by adding possibilities of autonomous mobility. The authors propose specifications which are based on a detailed study of similar projects described in specialized publications. Three operating modes are defined in order to adapt the system to a great diversity of situations. In the autonomous mode a global trajectory is planned, and the user then intervenes to point the goal and, if need be, stop a motion during its execution. The assisted manual mode allows access to local primitives like a wall following. Finally, in the manual mode, the authors find the classical control of a powered wheelchair again. The first results of the technical evaluation are discussed in the conclusion View full abstract»

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  • Design of a controlled-brake orthosis for FES-aided gait

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 13 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (34)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1688 KB)  

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a means of restoring gait to individuals with spinal cord injury, but the performance of most FES-aided gait systems is hampered by the rapid muscle fatigue which results from stimulated muscle contraction and the inadequate control of joint torques necessary to produce desired limb trajectories. The controlled-brake orthosis (CBO) addresses these limitations by utilizing FES in combination with a long-leg brace that contains controllable friction brakes at the knees and hips. A laboratory version of the CBO utilizing computer-controlled magnetic particle brakes at the joints was designed and constructed, and preliminary results with a single spinal cord injury (SCI) subject have demonstrated reduced fatigue and more repeatable gait trajectories when compared to FES-aided gait without the brace. Significant work remains to demonstrate the efficacy of the concept across a wide range of SCI subjects and to design a system which meets appropriate user requirements of size, weight, cosmesis, ease of use and cost. The primary purpose of the paper is to detail the design of the CBO View full abstract»

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  • A system for the analysis of foot and ankle kinematics during gait

    Publication Year: 1996 , Page(s): 25 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (99)  |  Patents (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (728 KB)  

    A five-camera Vicon (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, England) motion analysis system was used to acquire foot and ankle motion data. Static resolution and accuracy were computed as 0.86±0.13 mm and 98.9%, while dynamic resolution and accuracy were 0.1±0.89 and 99.4% (sagittal plane). Spectral analysis revealed high frequency noise and the need for a filter (6 Hz Butterworth low-pass) as used in similar clinical situations, A four-segment rigid body model of the foot and ankle was developed. The four rigid body foot model segments were (1) tibia and fibula, (2) calcaneus, talus, and navicular, (3) cuneiforms, cuboid, and metatarsals, and (4) hallux. The Euler method for describing relative foot and ankle segment orientation was utilized in order to maintain accuracy and ease of clinical application. Kinematic data from a single test subject are presented View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased publication in 2000. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabiliation Engineering.

Full Aims & Scope