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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 2 • Date Feb 1996

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • On the expected number of failures detected by subdomain testing and random testing

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):109 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (72)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1056 KB)

    We investigate the efficacy of subdomain testing and random testing using the expected number of failures detected (the E-measure) as a measure of effectiveness. Simple as it is, the E-measure does provide a great deal of useful information about the fault detecting capability of testing strategies. With the E-measure, we obtain new characterizations of subdomain testing, including several new con... View full abstract»

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  • On the use of testability measures for dependability assessment

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):97 - 108
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1376 KB)

    Program “testability” is informally, the probability that a program will fail under test if it contains at least one fault. When a dependability assessment has to be derived from the observation of a series of failure free test executions (a common need for software subject to “ultra high reliability” requirements), measures of testability can-in theory-be used to draw infe... View full abstract»

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  • Evolution and reuse of orthogonal architecture

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):153 - 157
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)

    We present a case study of evolution (or vertical reuse) in the domain of visual interactive software tools. We introduce an architecture suitable for this purpose, called orthogonal architecture. The paper describes the architecture itself, the reverse engineering process by which it was obtained, and the forward engineering process by which it was evolved View full abstract»

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  • A formal framework for on-line software version change

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):120 - 131
    Cited by:  Papers (67)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1460 KB)

    The usual way of installing a new version of a software system is to shut down the running program and then install the new version. This necessitates a sometimes unacceptable delay during which service is denied to the users of the software. An online software replacement system replaces parts of the software while it is in execution, thus eliminating the shutdown. While a number of implementatio... View full abstract»

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  • Mathematical notation in formal specification: too difficult for the masses?

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):158 - 159
    Cited by:  Papers (27)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB)

    The phrase “not much mathematics required” can imply a variety of skill levels. When this phrase is applied to computer scientists, software engineers, and clients in the area of formal specification, the word “much” can be widely misinterpreted with disastrous consequences. A small experiment in reading specifications revealed that students already trained in discrete math... View full abstract»

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  • Distributed shared abstractions (DSA) on multiprocessors

    Publication Year: 1996, Page(s):132 - 152
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2368 KB)

    Any parallel program has abstractions that are shared by the program's multiple processes. Such shared abstractions can considerably affect the performance of parallel programs, on both distributed and shared memory multiprocessors. As a result, their implementation must be efficient, and such efficiency should be achieved without unduly compromising program portability and maintainability. The pr... View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org