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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 12 • Dec. 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Scanning the Issue - Special Issue on Microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1995
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Project Management: Engineering, Technology, and Implementation, Book Review

    Publication Year: 1995
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Harald T. Friis [Scanning the Past]

    Publication Year: 1995
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  • Future Special Issues/Special Sections of the Proceedings

    Publication Year: 1995
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The design of the microarchitecture of UltraSPARC-I

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1653 - 1663
    Cited by:  Papers (16)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1208 KB)

    The realization of a high performance modern microprocessor involves hundreds of person-years of conception, logic design, circuit design, layout drawing, etc. In order to leverage effectively the 5-10 millions of transistors available, careful microarchitecture tradeoff analysis must be performed. This paper describes not only the microarchitecture of UltraSPARC-I, a 167 MHz 64-b four-way supersc... View full abstract»

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  • The microarchitecture of superscalar processors

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1609 - 1624
    Cited by:  Papers (124)  |  Patents (23)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1812 KB)

    Superscalar processing is the latest in along series of innovations aimed at producing ever-faster microprocessors. By exploiting instruction-level parallelism, superscalar processors are capable of executing more than one instruction in a clock cycle. This paper discusses the microarchitecture of superscalar processors. We begin with a discussion of the general problem solved by superscalar proce... View full abstract»

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  • Technology and business: forces driving microprocessor evolution

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1641 - 1652
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1472 KB)

    High-end microprocessors are the epitome of integrated circuit technology. But it is low end microprocessors which fuel progress in microprocessors. More than 98% of the four billion microprocessors forecast to ship worldwide in 1995 will end up in low end embedded applications. The microprocessor industry spends most of its research dollars developing high-end microprocessors for CPU applications... View full abstract»

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  • The history of the microcomputer-invention and evolution

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1601 - 1608
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (792 KB)

    Intel's founder, Robert Noyce, chartered Ted Hoff's Applications Research Department in 1969 to find new applications for silicon technology-the microcomputer was the result. Hoff thought it would be neat to use MOS LSI technology to produce a computer. Because of the ever growing density of large scale integrated (LSI) circuits a “computer on a chip” was inevitable. But in 1970 we cou... View full abstract»

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  • 6×86: the Cyrix solution to executing ×86 binaries on a high performance microprocessor

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1664 - 1672
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (900 KB)

    With the 6×86 microprocessor, Cyrix's design team demands optimum functionality and performance at an acceptable cost. Cyrix maintains that the way to get high performance is to keep larger units of processing together and to incorporate as much concurrency of execution as possible. To do the former, the microprocessor attempts to keep together all parts of an ×86 instruction as it pas... View full abstract»

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  • Compiler technology for future microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1995, Page(s):1625 - 1640
    Cited by:  Papers (25)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1824 KB)

    Advances in hardware technology have made it possible for microprocessors to execute a large number of instructions concurrently (i.e., in parallel). These microprocessors take advantage of the opportunity to execute instructions in parallel to increase the execution speed of a program. As in other forms of parallel processing, the performance of these microprocessors can vary greatly depending on... View full abstract»

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The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics.

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Editor-in-Chief
H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University