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Personal Communications, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Dec. 1995

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Personal Communications on the World Wide Web, Editor's Message

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    Freely Available from IEEE
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  • Conference Calendar

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  • Issues in Mobile Computing Systems, Guest Editors' Note

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 1995 index to IEEE Personal Communications

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  • Vision, issues, and architecture for nomadic computing [and communications]

    Page(s): 14 - 27
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    Computing and communications is bringing about a paradigm shift in the way these technologies are being used. The shift is in the direction of nomadic computing and communications. Nomadicity refers to the system support needed to provide a rich set of computing and communication capabilities and services to the nomad as he or she moves from place to place in a transparent, integrated and convenient form. This new paradigm is already manifesting itself as users travel to many different locations with laptops, personal digital assistants (PDAs) cellular telephones, pagers, and so on. In this article we discuss a vision of nomadicity as well as open issues, and architecture and design concerns that must be addressed as we bring about the system support necessary for nomadicity View full abstract»

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  • An overview of the PARCTAB ubiquitous computing experiment

    Page(s): 28 - 43
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    The PARCTAB system integrates a palm-sized mobile computer into an office network. The PARCTAB project serves as a preliminary testbed for ubiquitous computing, a philosophy originating at Xerox PARC that aims to enrich our computing environment by emphasizing context sensitivity, casual interaction and the spatial arrangement of computers. This article describes the ubiquitous computing philosophy, the PARCTAB system, user interface issues for small devices, and our experience in developing and testing a variety of mobile applications View full abstract»

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  • The use of network-based migrating user agents for personal communication services

    Page(s): 62 - 68
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    Proposes the use of a network-based agent that represents mobile users in a personal communication services (PCS) environment. The agent, called a user process, performs all the complex signalling functions on behalf of the mobile terminal, thus reducing the amount of signalling traffic that must travel over the valuable air interface. To achieve low call establishment delays, we propose migrating the user process as the mobile terminal moves. We examine three process migration techniques and determine the one mechanism that is most suited to our needs View full abstract»

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  • Dissemination-based data delivery using broadcast disks

    Page(s): 50 - 60
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    Mobile computers and wireless networks are emerging technologies which promise to make ubiquitous computing a reality. One challenge that must be met in order to truly realize this potential is that of providing mobile clients with ubiquitous access to data. One way (and perhaps the only way) to address these challenges is to provide stationary server machines with a relatively high-bandwidth channel over which to broadcast data to a client population in anticipation of the need for that data by the clients. Such a system can be said to be asymmetric due to the disparity in the transmission capacities of clients and servers. We have proposed a mechanism called broadcast disks to provide database access in this environment as well as in other asymmetric systems such as cable and direct broadcast satellite television networks and information distribution services. The broadcast disk approach enables the creation of an arbitrarily fine-grained memory hierarchy on the broadcast medium. This hierarchy, combined with the inversion of the traditional relationship between clients and servers that occurs in a broadcast-based system, raises fundamental new issues for client cache management and data prefetching. In this article we present a brief overview of asymmetric environments and describe our approaches to broadcast disk organization, client cache management, and prefetching View full abstract»

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  • Communications and consistency in mobile file systems

    Page(s): 44 - 48
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    To overcome the availability, latency, bandwidth, and cost barriers of mobile networks, mobile clients of distributed file systems switch between connected and disconnected modes of operation. Lying between these are modes of operation that refine the consistency semantics of cached files, allowing a mobile client to select a mode appropriate for the prevailing network conditions. Clients can take advantage of network opportunities unsuitable for connected operation, obtaining improved performance, more effective sharing, and more stringent consistency guarantees as a result. Today's mobile computing technology lets nomadic users operate computers large and small from their offices and homes and places in between. However, mobile users are often frustrated by the quality of distributed services available to them. In this article, we describe ways to extend the advantages of distributed file systems to users of mobile computers View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 2001. The current retitled publication is IEEE Wireless Communications.

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