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Solid-State Circuits Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Winter 2009

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  • IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine - Cover

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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Contributors

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  • Welcome to our first issue of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine! [Editor's Note]

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  • Volume 1, Number 1! [President's Corner]

    Page(s): 5
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  • Going to Wall Street or across the strait? [Associate Editor's View]

    Page(s): 6 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (326 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    If the CEOs of the China IC design houses were asked three years ago about their company's exit strategy, to be listed on NASDAQ through a glamorous IPO would no doubt occur to them as the ultimate success. View full abstract»

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  • Becoming a part of IEEE Xplore [From the Executive Director]

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  • The Making of the First Microprocessor

    Page(s): 8 - 21
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    The paper discusses the making of the first microprocessor and its history of how it is made. The Intel 4004 CPU-on-a-chip was developed under pressure on an extremely tight schedule. View full abstract»

    Open Access
  • Designing the first microprossor

    Page(s): 22 - 28
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    We now routinely buy personal computers in which microprocessors with millions of transistors perform at gigahertz speeds, so it is easy to forget that the first microprocessor was not a simple or obvious choice to produce. At the time it was being contemplated, metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) technology was still quite new, and integrated circuits themselves had existed less than a decade. While MOS circuits with a thousand transistors were being manufactured, the economics of integrated circuits of that day limited how far the technology could be pushed. The paper discusses how rethinking a customer's specifications led to simplifications that made the first microprocessor possible. View full abstract»

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  • Moore's law, microcomputer, and me

    Page(s): 29 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1732 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In 1960--ten years before Intel developed the first single-chip CPU (microcomputer central processing unit)-the revolution that would ensue was inconceivable: the cost of computing dropped by a factor of a million, modes of personal communication changed forever, and intelligent machines took over processes in manufacturing, transportation, medicine-virtually every aspect of our lives. Certainly Moore's law - that the number of transistors on a chip doubles every year, later amended to every two years - is a dominant factor in this revolution. In this paper, the author gives his views on Moore's law and focus on the role of applications engineering in developing Intel's first microcomputer. View full abstract»

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  • The 4004 CPU of my youth

    Page(s): 39 - 45
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    This article is a recollection of the development of the world's first microprocessor, the 4004, as seen from Busicom Corp., the Japanese desktop calculator manufacturer where this author was working from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. In 1969, Busicom Corp. launched a project to develop LSI chips for a ROM-based, macroinstruction-programmable decimal computer system. At that time, Busicom was a successful Japanese manufacturer of electronic calculators with a reputation for innovation. Through the LSI project, Busicom and Intel Corporation succeeded in March 1971 in developing the world's first 4-b microprocessor, the 4004, a product that was conceptually the exclusive property of Busicom. View full abstract»

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  • Memory system for a multi-chip digital computer [United States Patent 3,821,715]

    Page(s): 46 - 54
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    A general purpose digital computer which comprises a plurality of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) chips. Random-access-memories (RAM) and read-onlymemories (ROM) used as part of the computer are coupled to common bi-directional data buses to a central processing unit (CPU) with each memory including decoding circuitry to determine which of the plurality of memory chips is being addressed by the CPU. The computer is fabricated using chips mounted on standard 16 pin dual in-line packages allowing additional memory chips to be added to the computer. View full abstract»

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  • THE MCS-4 - An LSI micro computer system [reprint]

    Page(s): 55 - 60
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    The MCS-4 is a totally self-contained four-bit general purpose microprogrammable computer in component form. It consists of four basic elements: the CPU (central proces sing unit), the ROM (read only memory), the RAM (random access memory), and the SR (shift register). They are fabricated by MOS silicon gate technology and packaged in economical sixteen pin DIPs to minimize board area and reduce system cost. Using combinations of these standard building blocks, any degree of customization may be built into these powerful microprogrammed fourbit computers. Using as few as two devices, a C,PU and a ROM, a four-bit microprogrammed dedicated computer may be built for under $50. This paper describes this new micro-computer set, highlighting the system partitioning and the basic CPU hardware instruction set. View full abstract»

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  • Impact of LSI on future minicomputers

    Page(s): 61 - 62
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    The practicality of LSI for any application is determined by the cost advantage of the LSI products. To obtain low cost LSI devices, production must reach sufficient volumes to make the start-up costs insignificant. These start-up costs include design and debugging, generation of test procedures, paperwork for production control, and the manufacturer's learning curve for a new product. View full abstract»

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  • Intel MCS-4 micro computer set [Reprint]

    Page(s): 63 - 68
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    The MCS-4 is a microprogrammable computer set designed for applications such as test systems, peripherals, terminals, billing machines, measuring systems, numeric and process control. The 4004 CPU, 4003 SR, and 4002 RAM are standard building blocks. The 4001 ROM contains the custom microprogram and is implemented using a metal mask according to customer specifications. View full abstract»

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  • From mechanism to monolith

    Page(s): 69 - 75
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    The stressful nine-month gestation had passed both too quickly and too slowly. Now the wait was finally over and Federico Faggin, father, mother, and midwife, expectantly approached his newborn. Hope tempered with trepidation quickly bubbled over into elation as waveform after waveform happily revealed the lusty cries of a healthy infant: the 4004 was alive and well! It was certainly a promising start for the microprocessor, but not even the other parents of the 4004 - Stan Mazor, Ted Hoff, and Masatoshi Shima - could imagine just how promising. With astonishing speed, its descendants would completely transform human existence. View full abstract»

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  • Microprocessors of the future: Commodity or engine growth?

    Page(s): 76 - 82
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    The author begins with a discussion of the drivers behind processor performance developments. He goes on to discuss architecture improvements, process technology, processor frequency increases, increased integration aspects, adaptive design and improving designer productivity. View full abstract»

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  • The dawn of terascale computing

    Page(s): 83 - 89
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1540 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The digital revolution, far from abating, continues with even greater intensity in new applications in health, media, social networking, and many other areas of our lives. These applications will require revolutionary improvements in speed and capacity in future microprocessors so that they can process terabytes of information with teraflops of terascale computing power. Tera is not an exaggeration: trillions of hertz and trillions of bytes will be needed. In a terascale world, there will be new processing capabilities for mining and interpreting the world's growing mountain of data, and for doing so with even greater efficiency. Examples of applications are artificial intelligence in smart cars and appliances and virtual reality for modeling, visualization, physics simulation, and medical training. Many other applications are still on the edge of science fiction. In these applications, massive amounts of data must be processed. Three-dimensional (3-D) images in connected visual computing applications like virtual worlds can include hundreds of hours of video, thousands of documents, and tens of thousands of digital photos that require indexing and searching. Terascale computing refers to this massive processing capability with the right mix of memory and input/output (I/O) capabilities for use in everyday devices, from servers to desktops to laptops. View full abstract»

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  • People

    Page(s): 90 - 96
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  • Conference reports

    Page(s): 97 - 99
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  • Chapters

    Page(s): 100 - 104
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  • Society News

    Page(s): 105 - 107
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  • CEDA currents [IEEE News]

    Page(s): 108 - 112
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  • Footer

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Aims & Scope

Each issue of IEEE Solid-State Circuits Magazine is envisioned as a self-contained resource for fundamental theories and practical advances within the field of integrated circuits

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Mary Lanzerotti
marylanzerotti@post.harvard.edu