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Telecommunications Energy Conference, 2004. INTELEC 2004. 26th Annual International

Date 11-11 Sept. 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Proceedings. Sixth IEEE International Workshop on Web Site Evolution

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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v
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  • Welcome from the Workshop Chairs

    Page(s): vi - vii
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  • Workshop Committee

    Page(s): viii
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  • Acknowledgements

    Page(s): ix
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  • Testing a Web application

    Page(s): 3 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The work describes the requirements and constraints of testing a Web application system for the Austrian Chamber of Commerce. It separates the testing task into two parts - one for testing the Web architecture and one for testing the Internet application itself. The high costs of testing an Internet application are driven not only by the complexity of the architecture, but also by the complex usage profiles of the application. Non-functional quality characteristics such as usability, performance, security and interoperability take on particular importance in Web-based systems. Without a staff of skilled testers equipped with automated tools, it is not possible to ensure the reliability of e-commerce applications. The evolution of such systems requires that the evolved application be tested against the old one. In the project referred to here, a comparison tool was developed to validate both the backend data base contents and the front-end Web page contents. View full abstract»

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  • A 2-layer model for the white-box testing of Web applications

    Page(s): 11 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    White-box testing exercises a software system by ensuring that a model of the internal structure is covered by the test cases. Extending this approach to Web applications is far from obvious, because at least two abstraction levels can be considered to represent the internal structure of a Web application: the navigation model and the control flow model. To further complicate the matter, dynamic code generation must be taken into account in both models. In this paper, the two alternative models are presented and white-box testing criteria are defined on them. Their usage for the white-box testing of a real-world Web application is described, highlighting the associated costs and benefits. View full abstract»

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  • Observations on the implementation and testing of scripted Web applications

    Page(s): 20 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scripting languages have become a very popular choice for implementing server-side programs in Web applications. Scripting languages are thought to provide quick start up and enhance programmer productivity. We present two case studies in which scripting languages were used. In both studies, the projects struggled with implementation; however, project factors such as the strength of management and the training of the development team are thought to out weigh the choice of programming language in terms of impact on project success. The choice to implement a Web application with a scripting language can lead to undisciplined behavior on the part of management and the development team, so caution must be exercised when implementing complex applications. Testers of scripted implementations should adjust their risk profile to match the error-prone aspects of the language. Dynamically type checked scripting languages are likely to be susceptible to type errors. Scripting languages are powerful enough to successfully implement complex e-commerce applications as long as management and software engineering practice are strong. View full abstract»

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  • Web site evolution via transaction reengineering

    Page(s): 31 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a transaction-oriented Web site, the user executes a series of activities in order to carry out a specific task (e.g., purchase an airplane ticket). The manner in which the activities can be executed is a consequence of the transaction design, partially influenced by the constraints implied by the business model underlying the Web application. Unfortunately, many Web sites are constructed with the transaction design hidden in the overall system implementation. The result is a system with unpredictable workflow, which can make evolution difficult. This paper presents a technique for Web site evolution via transaction reengineering. The reengineering process consists of the recovery of the "as-is" design model of a Web application transaction, an analysis of the result to determine desirable restructuring options, and a redesign of the transaction model based on this analysis. The reengineering process relies on formalism that is a user-centered extension of the transaction design model of the ubiquitous Web applications (UWA) framework. The goal of the reengineering process is to emerge with a transaction design that better reflects the user experience and also facilitates disciplined evolution of the Web-based application. An example from the travel industry is used to illustrate the process. View full abstract»

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  • Legal concerns of Web site reverse engineering

    Page(s): 41 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Researchers involved in Web site reverse engineering are often not aware of potential legal implications of using someone else's Web site for experimentation. Even if researchers are concerned with legal problems, there is little guidance available. This paper explores the legality of Web site reverse engineering with the intent to raise awareness among researchers about this issue. The discussed legal issues encompass copyright, contract, and trespass law. View full abstract»

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  • Creating effective load models for performance testing with incomplete empirical data

    Page(s): 51 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For all that the effectiveness of performance testing in terms of the accuracy of load simulation is a common topic of conversation and concern among people and organizations that build or depend on Web-based applications, testing a Web site in such a way as to reliably predict performance is still often more of an art than a science. More than a few brilliant minds have dedicated their careers to this complex topic, and several have published detailed and mathematically sound methods to plan for, predict and model performance characteristics very accurately - as long as there is sufficient empirical data to work from. View full abstract»

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  • PAWA: a program analysis tool for Web based intranet applications

    Page(s): 63 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Web based intranet applications are increasingly becoming popular in organizations for in-house functions. These applications are different from Web sites as they offer substantially greater opportunities for users in terms of modifying the site status and they are different from traditional software applications due to their WWW platform. Unlike traditional Web applications they are smaller in size and closer to traditional software than Web sites. Usually such applications are developed in a short time and no documentation is available. Due to emerging technologies and organizational needs these applications need to be modified, tested and enhanced frequently. Existing tools are not helpful in analyzing the programs of such applications. The paper presents a tool for program analysis of Web based intranet applications. The information recovered by the tool helps in comprehending such applications and facilitates their maintenance, testing and evolution. A case study is carried out with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of the tool. View full abstract»

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  • Identifying cross site scripting vulnerabilities in Web applications

    Page(s): 71 - 80
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5400 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Cross site scripting (XSS) is a vulnerability of a Web application that is essentially caused by the failure of the application to check up on user input before returning it to the client's Web browser. Without an adequate validation, user input may include malicious code that may be sent to other clients and unexpectedly executed by their browsers, thus causing a security attack. Techniques to prevent this type of attacks require that all application input must be checked up and filtered, encoded, or validated before sending them to any user. In order to discover the XSS vulnerabilities in a Web application, traditional source code analysis techniques can be exploited. In this paper, in order to assess the XSS vulnerability of a Web application, an approach that combines static and dynamic analysis of the Web application is presented. Static analysis based criteria have been defined to detect potential vulnerabilities in the server pages of a Web application, while a process of dynamic analysis has been proposed in order to detect actual vulnerabilities. Some case studies have been carried out, giving encouraging results. View full abstract»

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  • Web application testing beyond tactics

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    In this talk, the author presents results from analyzing Web testing strategies at several Fortune 500 companies, and some of the changes made to improve the return from Web testing efforts. The talk places this work in the context of the evolving technical challenges of Web testing, and considers advantages and risks of several types of change to testing processes, practices and staffing. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Page(s): 85
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