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Software Engineering Conference, 2005. Proceedings. 2005 Australian

Date March 29 2005-April 1 2005

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  • 2005 Australian Software Engineering Conference - Cover

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • Proceedings. 2005 Australian Software Engineering Conference

    Publication Year: 2005
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  • 2005 Australian Software Engineering Conference - Copyright Page

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): iv
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  • 2005 Australian Software Engineering Conference - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): v - vii
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  • Message from the General Chair

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): viii
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  • Message from the Program Chair

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): ix
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  • Organising Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): x
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  • Steering Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): x
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  • Research Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xi
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  • Industry Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xii
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  • Additional reviewers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xiii
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  • Document driven disciplined development of software

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (44 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is no accident that the branches of engineering are called "disciplines". Every properly educated engineer has learned that the design of quality products requires discipline and a willingness to follow standard procedures. Engineers understand that they must produce a specified set of documents and perform a variety of analyses whose results must be included in the documents. Engineers who do these things are less likely to produce a defective product. In many jurisdictions, engineers who fail to follow the standard discipline may be considered to have been negligent. Software development should not be different but most developers have not been taught the appropriate discipline and neither their employers nor the customers know what to demand. At the heart of the problem is our failure to agree on a set of documents that contain analyzable descriptions and specifications. We begin with highly simplified "models" that have a vague resemblance. Most of these models have properties that could never be implemented and ignore critical facts that are essential for trustworthy products. View full abstract»

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  • The challenges of managing a global software engineering capability: theory to practice

    Publication Year: 2005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The emergence of "off shoring or outsourcing" in the debate about where best to do software development and applications support has added yet another layer of complexity into the domain of development managers. This is on top of the usual plethora of issues we all know and love such as configuration and requirements management, design, enhancements, reuse and refactoring, baseline controls, IP protection, technology issues, standards, testing, porting and distribution, support and maintenance. All these make the practice of managing a global software engineering capability especially interesting. The various commentaries on good software engineering practice are often about what to do on single projects in serial environments to manage the risks associated with the various issues raised above. In Mincom's commercial environment there exists the added challenge of the need for integration of a range of different but concurrent projects together with the complexity of managing the delivery of this capability globally. The competition for resources together with skills matching ensures a number of management challenges. This presentation addresses some of the techniques used to; enforce standards without stifling innovation, improve software quality without imposing zealous quality overheads, compare and contrast outsourcing options. Some observations on the use of agile methods are given as well as an impact analysis of resource balancing. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual machines, managed code and component technology

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 5 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Abstract machines have been used as an implementation mechanism for programming languages for more than thirty years. In their latest incarnation execution engines based on virtual machines offer "managed execution ". The implications of this change go far beyond the superficial advantages of platform portability and go to the heart of software reliability. In this paper it is argued that managed execution platforms such as the .NET common language runtime and the Java virtual machine form the only reasonable basis for trustworthy component software. There is also an overview of current research in this field, including the vexed question of version evolution. View full abstract»

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  • Model-driven development within a legacy system: an industry experience report

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 14 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (94 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Model-driven development claims to offer the same improvement to developers that the step from assembly to procedural programming languages offered developers in the last century. In this paper we report on a project that assessed the feasibility of applying a model-driven development approach to the evolution of a non-trivial legacy system in an industrial setting. The project focused on whether the promises of model-driven development hold in the real world and whether it possible to adopt model-driven development without losing the investment in existing third generation language code. An existing component from a system was redeveloped and integrated back into the system using a current model-driven development tool at Invensys Rail Systems Australia. From experiences throughout the project, and with the tool, a set of requirements for future model-driven development and model-driven development tools was produced. These requirements are designed to both aid tool developers, and to give companies a way of assessing the maturity of both future model-driven development tools and model-driven development itself. View full abstract»

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  • Consistent code generation from UML models

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 23 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Relational calculus of object systems (rCOS) is an OO-language which is equipped with an observation-oriented semantics and a refinement calculus based on the Hoare and He's unifying theories of programming (UTP). In this paper, we give syntactic definitions for class diagrams and sequence diagrams in UML 2.0. Based on these definitions, we give an algorithm for checking the consistency of a class diagram and a sequence diagram. Furthermore, we develop an algorithm to generate rCOS code from any given consistent class diagram and sequence diagram. View full abstract»

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  • Extending UML for model composition

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 31 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The success of UML and more generally, of the model driven approach, has led to a proliferation of models, representing various systems, but the description of large applications may actually be composed of several system models. Therefore, the challenge is to determine how to compose independent system models, in order to build large applications. We present in this paper the software federation approach developed by our team. A federation relies on the concept of a domain, which describes a specific application domain, represented with a specific meta-model. Building a software federation means composing independently developed domains, by composing their meta-models. The UML standard, which is well supported by tools, has been found convenient for describing our meta-models, but it turns out that it does not contain sufficient modelling capabilities for the composition of these models. This paper analyses the need for model composition, the available UML concepts related to model composition and proposes an UML profile allowing the composition of models in software federations. View full abstract»

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  • Improving goal and role oriented analysis for agent based systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 40 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The separation between analysis and design phases has long been advocated in software engineering literature. There has been active interest in the area of agent oriented software engineering but the methodologies developed do not focus on a clear separation between the two phases. Furthermore, existing agent oriented methodologies tend to be tied to a particular design architecture and applicable only for small systems. In this paper, we describe a goal and role based analysis methodology that is both unbiased towards any design architecture and is scalable. The model is derived from improvements to the ROADMAP methodology for agent oriented systems developed at the University of Melbourne. We also present REBEL - CASE tool developed to support the methodology. Furthermore, several examples and experiences with the method are discussed. We conclude by comparing analysis models of other agent oriented methodologies to ours. View full abstract»

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  • Tackling the complexity of requirements engineering process improvement by partitioning the improvement task

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 48 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software process improvement is a complex and expensive endeavor requiring extensive resources and long term commitment. In the present study software process improvement (SPI) problems in small organizations were tackled by dividing the overall effort into three subtopics: technical infrastructure, working practices, and management infrastructure. Partitioning the SPI efforts into these three subtopics makes it apparent that all of these topics do not need to be tackled in the same way but some tasks can, e.g., be outsourced. In this paper the results of an investigation into the use of the model above in requirements engineering (RE) process improvement are reported from three industrial case studies. A domain specific method was constructed independently of the utilizing companies, i.e., outsourced, and it was then used in SPI efforts in the companies to establish a solid infrastructure for basic RE in a short period of time, with limited resources, and without previous expertise in RE. It is argued that the suggested partitioning can both lower the threshold for initiating software process improvement efforts in industry and increase the likelihood of successfully completing them. View full abstract»

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  • Merging requirements views with incompleteness and inconsistency

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 58 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of X-SCTUMUS methodology is to support the collaborative development of software requirements specifications. It is a viewpoint-based approach which separates the descriptions provided by different stakeholders, and concentrates on identifying and resolving conflicts between them. X-SCTL/MUS allows the incremental development of each partial model, facilitating the task division and decreasing the development complexity. In order to fulfill all these exigencies, one of its functionalities consists in providing a way to compose requirements from different agents in a merged specification which represents explicitly overspecification and underspecification phenomena and over which, for instance, it is possible to formally verify properties. The main issue in this paper is precisely the description of the composition operator used to obtain the merged model representing the stakeholders' requirements. We will show the criteria employed to select the composition operator that fits the desired characteristics best. Finally, the contribution will be illustrated with a little but explanatory example. View full abstract»

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  • Australian software development: what software project management practices lead to success?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 70 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We surveyed a number of Australian software practitioners in order to understand what software development practices were used in their recent software projects. We were particularly interested to discover what project management practices are common in Australian software projects. The relationship between practices and software project outcomes enables us to investigate why some projects succeed and others fail. We found that nearly 20% of projects had no lifecycle methodology and 10% of our respondents did not understand what was meant by a software development lifecycle methodology. Many recognized software practices are not being applied consistently in the projects investigated. Fifty percent of projects began with unclear requirements. Risk assessment is not normally a part of the development process and the organizations are not learning from their mistakes as post mortem reviews are much more likely to be held for successful projects than they are for unsuccessful projects. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluation of effects of pair work on quality of designs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 78 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quality is a key issue in the development of software products. Although the literature acknowledges the importance of the design phase of software lifecycle and the effects of the design process and intermediate products on the final product, little progress has been achieved in addressing the quality of designs. This is partly due to difficulties associated in defining quality attributes with precision and measurement of the many different types and styles of design products, as well as problems with assessing the methodologies utilized in the design process. In this research we report on an empirical investigation that we conducted to examine and evaluate quality attributes of design products created through a process of pair-design and solo-design. The process of pair-design methodology involves pair programming principles where two people work together and periodically switch between the roles of driver and navigator. The evaluation of the quality of design products was based on ISO/IEC 9126 standards. Our results show some mixed findings about the effects of pair work on the quality of design products. View full abstract»

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  • Defining autonomic computing: a software engineering perspective

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 88 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As a rapidly growing field, autonomic computing is a promising new approach for developing large scale distributed systems. However, while the vision of achieving self-management in computing systems is well established, the field still lacks a commonly accepted definition of 'what' an autonomic computing system is. Without a common definition to dictate the direction of development, it is not possible to know whether a system or technology is a part of autonomic computing, or if in fact an autonomic computing system has already been built. The purpose of this paper is to establish a standardised and quantitative definition of autonomic computing through the application of the quality metrics framework described in IEEE Std 1061-1998. Through the application of this methodology, stakeholders were systematically analysed and evaluated to obtain a balanced and structured definition of autonomic computing. This definition allows for further development and implementation of quality metrics, which are project-specific, quantitative measurements that can be used to validate the success of future autonomic computing projects. View full abstract»

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  • A UML approach to the generation of test sequences for Java-based concurrent systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 100 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Starting with a UML specification that captures the underlying functionality of some given Java-based concurrent system, we describe a systematic way to construct, from this specification, test sequences for validating an implementation of the system. The approach is to first extend the specification to create UML state machines that directly address those aspects of the system we wish to test. To be specific, the extended UML state machines can capture state information about the number of waiting threads or the number of threads blocked on a given object. Using the SAL model checker we can generate from the extended UML state machines sequences that cover all the various possibilities of events and states. These sequences can then be directly transformed into test sequences suitable for input into a testing tool such as ConAn. As an illustration, the methodology is applied to generate sequences for testing a Java implementation of the producer-consumer system. View full abstract»

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  • A tool to support perspective based approach to software code inspection

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 110 - 117
    Cited by:  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is widely accepted that code inspection is one of the more cost effective forms of testing. It requires a group of inspectors coming together to find defects in an inspection artifact. However, as inspection artifacts grow larger and more complicated, the burden of conducting the code inspection process outweighs the benefits that it provides. Even with the help of automated tools, the process itself has become inefficient as it consumes a large amount of limited resources. Therefore, there has been much research focus on improving the reading technique, which makes a significant impact on the quality of the inspection. In this paper, we discuss the perspective-based reading technique and its benefits to object-oriented projects. We also discuss the need for a new inspection tool and this leads us to propose a tool that supports the perspective-based reading technique with the use of UML design diagrams. This tool supports perspective-based reading technique by matching scenarios in the form of design diagrams to source code and subsequently searching for discrepancies between the two. The use of design diagrams avoids overlapping of inspection effort; thus, increases the efficiency of code inspection even for large projects. We explain how the tool makes the more effort-driven perspective-based reading technique relatively easy as compared to doing it manually. View full abstract»

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