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Testbeds and Research Infrastructures for the Development of Networks and Communities, 2005. Tridentcom 2005. First International Conference on

Date 23-25 Feb. 2005

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  • Proceedings. First International Conference on Testbeds and Research Infrastructures for the Development of Networks and Communities

    Publication Year: 2005
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): v - vii
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  • Introduction

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): viii
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  • Conference Committees

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): ix - xi
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  • The IMS playground @ FOKUS-an open testbed for generation network multimedia services

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) defined by the 3rd Generation Partnership Projects (3GPP and 3GPP2) represents today the global Service Delivery Platform (SDP) standard for providing multimedia applications in Next Generation Networks (NGN). It defines an overlay service architecture that merges the paradigms and technologies of the Internet with the cellular and fixed telecommunication worlds. The architecture enables the efficient provision of an open set of potentially highly integrated multimedia services, combining Web browsing, email, instant messaging, presence, VoIP, video conferencing, application sharing, telephony, unified messaging, multimedia content delivery, etc., on top of possibly different network technologies. Also interworking with the Internet and legacy networks is supported. As such the IMS enables various business models for providing seamless business and consumer multimedia applications. Knowing that the full potential of the IMS can only be revealed by the early nondiscriminant provision of IMS know how and related technologies to the different market players the Fraunhofer Institute FOKUS has launched the "Open IMS Playground" in July 2004 as part of the German 3G beyond national testbed. This paper introduces the IMS standard and provides an overview of the "Open IMS playground @ FOKUS". View full abstract»

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  • Performance evaluation of recovery techniques in a grid oriented Metrocore/VESPER field trial

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 12 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The introduction of advanced features, provided by the emerging next generation networks based on the Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching (GMPLS) protocol framework in grid computing systems, promises to significantly improve the performance of distributed applications and services. An accurate experimental analysis of the main GMPLS features, such as the different reliability solutions, is then required. In this paper, we present the experimental implementation of different reliability solutions in the Metrocore/VESPER field trial, the high-performance network infrastructure located in Pisa, Italy. Protection and restoration schemes are investigated both at the IP/MPLS and physical layer. View full abstract»

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  • A testbed and research network for next generation services over next generation networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 22 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1016 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The complexity of today's data communication networks necessitates complete, realistic and sophisticated testing grounds for verifying and validating their functionality. Network testing grounds are restricted to laboratories and environments isolated from real life scenarios. Testing in production and commercial networks is typically forbidden since they present a high degree of risk factors for service availability. Additionally, the majority of today's communication network testbeds lack the scale and flexibility needed to properly represent a true networking environment. Before deploying live networks there is a need to have a network testing environment scalable and flexible enough where issues such as: network design, vendor interoperability, endurance, multiprotocol layer interconnectivity, a vendor's specific implementations of standards and network design viability have been verified to meet the requirements. In this paper a design and implementation of a next generation network is described, where both testing and production traffic coexist. NCIT*net 2 is an optical transmission network supporting end-to-end services over technologies such as Ethernet, SONET, MPLS and DWDM. The paper also discusses key technology aspects related to the functionality of equipment and network from a service point of view. These include the physical layer and network operation, as well as architecture and control. The testbed network is used for the deployment of networking services over the above technologies in order to verify service implementation, provisioning and assurance of quality of service requirements. This network also allows testing and evaluating systems, subsystems and components from different vendors in various interconnections. The paper goes further to describe, as an example, the tests designed and implemented for the analysis of MPLS based services over next generation networks. View full abstract»

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  • An experience in IPv6 networking supporting Ecumene Web information system for cultural heritage

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    People interested in Cultural Heritage constitute a community of users characterized by a high degree of mobility. Users visiting cultural sites hosted by local institutions expect to access information pertaining to cultural/artistic heritage from anywhere at anytime, as they can through the desk at their own homes or offices. The Ecumene Web Information System, developed in the groundwork of the Ecumene Project, offers a framework for accessing the artistic and cultural information through a Web application. In this paper, we expose the underlying communication network architecture, based on the IPv6 protocol and investigate the benefits of its adoption, in terms of mobility and security support. Indeed, the need of granting different access rights to different user classes enforces the security requirements of the system. Lastly, the open issues related to the practical integration of an experimental testbed with Mobile IPv6 and IPSec support are detailed and possible solutions are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Design considerations on the CREATE-NET testbed

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 44 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The CREATE-NET testbed is a long term project aiming at implementing a best state-of-the-art infrastructure able to link together research centers, both from academia and industrial bodies, in order to create a fruitful collaborative environment to help generating new ideas for advanced applications and services, developing new protocols, testing and integrating different vendor equipments. This testbed is aimed to be unique as it covers novel topics such as optical and wireless integration and WiMAX experimentation for offering broadband access to rural communities. In this paper we present both the technical design issues and a general outline of the implementation process. View full abstract»

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  • Ubiquitous home: real-life testbed for home context-aware service

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 54 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology of Japan completed a real-life testbed, called the "ubiquitous home", for home context-aware service experiments in 2004. From the viewpoint of sensor ubiquity, the Ubiquitous Home is superior to other similar testbeds. At the Ubiquitous Home, experimenters can collect real-life data as if living in their own house, not in a laboratory. This paper introduces an overview and detailed sensor arrangement of the Ubiquitous Home. Two cases from several progressing experiments are also presented. The first case is on connecting networked appliances; the second concerns the combination of wearable devices and the Ubiquitous Home sensors to record user behavior. View full abstract»

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  • A testbed for evaluating human interaction with ubiquitous computing environments

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 60 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (722 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Core to ubiquitous computing environments are adaptive software systems that adapt their behavior to the context in which the user is attempting the task the system aims to support. This context is strongly linked with the physical environment in which the task is being performed. The efficacy of such adaptive systems is thus highly dependent on the human perception of the provided system behavior within the context represented by that particular physical environment and social situation. However, effective evaluation of human interaction with adaptive ubiquitous computing technologies has been hindered by the cost and logistics of accurately controlling such environmental context. This paper describes TATUS, a ubiquitous computing simulator aimed at overcoming these cost and logistical issues. Based on a 3D games engine, the simulator has been designed to maximize usability and flexibility in the experimentation of adaptive ubiquitous computing systems. We also describe how this simulator is interfaced with a testbed for wireless communication domain simulation. View full abstract»

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  • An open access wideband multiantenna wireless testbed with remote control capability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 72 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces an open access wideband multiantenna wireless testbed. The testbed is configured as a four transmit antenna by four receive antenna system based on software defined radio technology. It operates in the 2.4 GHz ISM band and supports an RF bandwidth compatible to IEEE 802.11a/g standard. A robotic positioning system has been developed to automatically control the position and orientation of the antenna array, which makes automated testing possible and greatly reduces engineering time. The testbed is configured such that it can be controlled by any computer on the Internet. This makes remote debugging and testing possible. This characteristic of test automation and remote access through Internet was designed into the testbed to make it a valuable resource to the other researchers. A set of software has been developed to support research using the testbed, with the current focus on MIMO channel characterization and MIMO-OFDM packet communications. A data acquisition system and an offline processing system have been developed for the testbed and have been used for over the air testing to produce results for the ongoing IEEE 802.11n standardization activity. View full abstract»

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  • A geography-aware scalable community wireless network test bed

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 82 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless mesh networks have increasingly become an object of interest in recent years as a strong alternative to purely wired infrastructure networks and purely mobile wireless networks. Given the challenges that have arisen in construction, deployment and maintenance of wireless mesh networks, we outline a broad experimental research program in the area of medium-to-large scale community wireless networks. Our research is conducted in the context of an operational community network built in our test bed laboratory with continual plans to expand to the town of Troy, NY (up to hundreds of nodes in a 1-2 mile radius around RPl campus). Leveraging Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers and Geographic Distributed Addressing (GDA), a novel and intuitive addressing assignment, geographic-based forwarding algorithms such as GPSR and TBF can be easily tested and traffic engineering theories implemented in a real-world environment. Our paper documents several design considerations and contributions in implementing community wireless networks including autoconfiguration, addressing structure and antenna characteristics among other items, in addition to describing our novel test bed lab where RF effects of distances of thousands of meters can be simulated with server, antenna and variable attenuator clusters. View full abstract»

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  • A low-cost and simple-to-deploy peer-to-peer wireless network based on open source Linux routers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 92 - 97
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we present our work towards deploying a community wireless network with ad hoc communication and routing between its elements. We describe our network model and implementation of wireless routers, while motivating decisions and pointing out open issues. The main advantage of our approach is the low deployment cost and inherent flexibility in terms of adapting the network configuration with little or no human intervention, which in turn can be exploited to support the dynamic addition, removal and mobility of network elements. View full abstract»

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  • A testbed and methodology for experimental evaluation of wireless mobile ad hoc networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 100 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless mobile ad hoc network experimentation is subjected to stochastic factors from the radio environment and node mobility. To achieve test repeatability and result re-producibility such stochastic factors need to be controlled or assessed in order to obtain conclusive results. This has implications on the design of testbeds. We present a methodology that addresses repeatability and describe how it has guided us in the design of our Ad hoc Protocol Evaluation (APE) testbed. Finally, by using APE, we present side-by-side routing protocol comparison results and show a radio phenomena that is not visible in simulations. View full abstract»

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  • A testbed for experimentation of innovative services in the B3G framework

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 110 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    UMTS 3G networks are going to be widely deployed commercially, even if in their first releases they will be mainly focused on telephony and multimedia services based on circuit switched technologies. The roll out of the 3GPP IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), that can be forecast to happen in the next few years, will introduce mobile users to a new class of multimedia services based on the Internet protocol. The research community is already investigating a possible evolution for the 3G networks based on heterogeneous high-speed access networks allowing new multimedia services and a global coverage (Beyond 3G - B3G). In the present paper we describe a testbed developed by the Co.Ri.TeL. Consortium in the framework of the Presto Project, whose objective is to provide a suitable and common platform, inspired to the IMS ideas, for experimenting a wide variety of B3G SIP-based mobile services. The services experimented on top of the testbed include a multiuser video conferencing architecture, added-value user-defined multimedia services, an audio-video message box and a video-on-demand provisioning infrastructure. The service provisioning mechanisms are all built within a common mobility-management and security framework, providing an approach which is independent from the various possible underlying radio access technologies. In particular, the security capabilities of the developed architecture comprise user and network authentication, authorization to service access and IP-layer signalling cryptography integrated with application-layer mobility. View full abstract»

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  • Running variance metric for evaluating performance of wireless IP networks in the MobileCty testbed

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 120 - 127
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (920 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes and analyzes a Running Variance Metric performance measurement of wireless local area networks and its formal aspects. Our approach evaluates the performance of wireless local area networks in infrastructure mode as well as in ad hoc mode. The Running Variance Metric is used to discover relative traffic loads of available access-points/gateways at the network layer in order to provide connectivity to the wired network. The paper discusses a simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate the usefulness and efficiency of the Running Variance Metric to evaluate the utilization of available access-points/gateways. It is also shown that this metric can be used for hop-analysis in multihop ad hoc wireless networks. View full abstract»

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  • Wireless link SNR mapping onto an indoor testbed

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 130 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (640 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To facilitate a broad range of experimental research on novel protocols and application concepts, we consider an indoor wireless testbed to emulate the performance of real-world networks. A fundamental issue for emulation is the replication of communication links of specified quality. In particular, we need to replicate on the testbed, for every link in the real world, a communication link whose received signal-to-interference-and-noise-ratio (SINR) matches the corresponding link signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). In this paper, we focus on the downlink SNR mapping associated with a network with a single access point (AP). Four indoor wireless propagation models (commercial buildings with/without line-of-sight path and residential buildings with/without line-of-sight path) and two types of spatial distributions (uniform distribution inside a circular cell and uniform distribution along a line) have been investigated. Based on the characteristics of the indoor testbed, we propose a mapping method with one AP and one interferer, which separates the task into two phases: in the first phase, the best location and transmission power for the interferer node are determined; in the second phase, the topology of receiver nodes is configured by a minimum weight matching algorithm. Through analysis and simulations, we find that when the interferer node is located on the corner across from the AP, we can achieve a mapping range on the order of 57 dB and an average root-mean-square (RMS) mapping error less than 1 dB. View full abstract»

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  • ORBIT testbed software architecture: supporting experiments as a service

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 136 - 145
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (896 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the software architecture of the ORBIT radio grid testbed. We describe the requirements for supporting the lifecycle of an experiment and how they influenced the overall design of the architecture. We specifically highlight those components and services which will be visible to a user of the ORBIT testbed. View full abstract»

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  • ORBIT Measurements framework and library (OML): motivations, implementation and features

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 146 - 152
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we present ORBIT measurement framework and library (OML), which is a distributed software framework enabling real-time collection of data in a large distributed environment. The success of a multiuser distributed testbed facility depends largely on the ease of use, remote access as well as on the ease of collecting useful measurements from experimental runs. OML provides a flexible and dynamic way in which data is collected and made available for realtime access to the experimenters. Application programmers can use simple interfaces provided to transfer measurements and other performance data to a central repository. This paper focuses on the motivation, requirements, design, implementation and real world usage of OML that is designed to provide a scalable, controllable and easy to use mechanism for experimenters to collect useful results from the experiments conducted on the ORBIT testbed. View full abstract»

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  • Addressing repeatability in wireless experiments using ORBIT testbed

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 153 - 160
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the rapid growth in research activity on future wireless networking applications and protocols, experimental study and validation is becoming an increasingly important tool to obtain realistic results that may not be possible under the constrained environment of network simulators. However, experimental results must be reproducible and repeatable for them to be used to compare proposed systems and to build prototypes. In this paper, we address the issue of repeatability in wireless experiments in the Open Access Research Testbed for Next-Generation Wireless Networks (ORBIT) testbed and propose a mechanism to promote reproducible experiments using periodic calibration of the equipment. Several experimental results that capture repeatability in time and space using our initial testbed setup are also provided. View full abstract»

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  • Scalable testbed for next-generation wireless networking technologies

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 162 - 171
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an overview of a new wireless network research testbed being developed by several wireless communications and networking research groups at UCLA. Its primary objective is to provide researchers at every layer of the protocol stack, from physical devices to transport protocols, a testbed to evaluate the impact of their technology on application level performance, using scalable and realistic operational scenarios. To achieve this objective, the testbed will use a collection of physical testbeds integrated with a scalable, multitool simulation framework. View full abstract»

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  • A practical approach for 4G systems: deployment of overlay networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 172 - 181
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Experimental activities play a vital role in the deployment and development of novel radio access networks. In particular the movement from 3G to 4G poses new challenges, which need to be solved using practical approaches such as testbeds. This paper presents a testbed that can be regarded as an early attempt to build a 4G system. It fully integrates heterogeneous wireless technologies using a loosely-coupled architecture. Also, experimental results are included to show the possibilities of this setup. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis and experimentation over heterogeneous wireless networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 182 - 191
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Wireless and mobile networks represent an enabling technology for ubiquitous access to information systems. However, there are critical issues that still prevent the widespread use of these technologies. In this paper we analyze and discuss our experience over a real ubiquitous network testbed capable to provide a seamless hand-off among heterogeneous networks. We describe Mobile IPv6/IPv4 interoperability and an efficient mechanism, based on link-layer information, for a seamless handoff among wired and wireless networks. We present the solutions adopted in setting up a real testbed and provide an evaluation of the observed performance, including a characterization of interoperability among three wireless access network technologies: 802.11 WLAN, GPRS, and UMTS. View full abstract»

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  • A global X-bone for network experiments

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 194 - 203
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A global Internet overlay testbed is being deployed to support the distributed, shared use of resources for network research. The Global X-Bone (GX-Bone) augments the X-Bone software system, enhancing its coordination mechanisms to support deployment of local overlays to world-wide, shared infrastructure. The GX-Bone is based on the X-Bone's Virtual Internet Architecture which extends the Internet for both concurrent, parallel and recursive overlays and provides decentralized, automated deployment and management. GX-Bone supports host visualization through the NetFS file system, granting individual users compartmentalized access and control of host and router configuration and the DataRouter extension to IP loose source routing that supports application control of network-layer forwarding. GX-Bone can be installed on user-modified kernels, uniquely supporting both conventional kernel-level protocol development and coordinated global infrastructure sharing. View full abstract»

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