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Digital Libraries, 2004. Proceedings of the 2004 Joint ACM/IEEE Conference on

Date 7-11 June 2004

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 118
  • Combined searching of Web and OAI digital library resources

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 343 - 344
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB)  

    We describe an experiment in combined searching of Web pages and digital library resources, exposed via an open archives metadata provider and Web gateway service. We utilize only free/open source software components for our investigation, in order to demonstrate feasibility of deployment for all institutions. View full abstract»

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  • Ontology acquisition and semantic retrieval from semantic annotated Chinese poetry

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 345 - 346
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (226 KB)  

    We aim to utilize semantic Web [James Hendler et al., (2002)] technology to the semantic annotation of classical Chinese poetry. We investigate the feasibilities and advantages of semantic retrieval and automated ontology acquisition from semantically annotated poems based on a Chinese thesaurus. We have induced a set of semantic composition rules for pair-wise character (word) patterns that can be used to parse the poem sentences and recursively generate RDF [(1999)] triple relations among the pair of characters (words). We have also defined a scoring scheme to assess semantic similarity for semantic retrieval. We showed that the semantic retrieval method significantly outperformed the keyword-based retrieval method. View full abstract»

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  • DLIST: opening LIS research and practice

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB)  

    We describe DLIST, a digital library for Library and Information Science Research and Practice and for Information Technology as it relates to LIS. It is built upon the open access eprints model, but that extends materials in the collection beyond the formal, scholarly literature to include other types of content created by researchers and practitioners. DLIST is intended to promote resource sharing in LIS and IT and to attempt to bridge the gap between research and practice. The notion of open access is briefly discussed as a central tenet for the development of the intellectual commons as an interactive space for learning. View full abstract»

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  • Usability of digital libraries: an evaluation model

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  

    This research proposes methods and instruments for assessing usability of academic digital libraries. Criteria in this study are effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, and learnability. It is found that there exist interlocking relationships among effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction. View full abstract»

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  • Mobile image capture and management

    Publication Year: 2004
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (257 KB)  

    We have developed a camera-phone prototype for capturing and indexing digital images that uses geo-location for position metadata, a calendar for event categories and an address book as the platform for image management and retrieval. Images are captured using a commercially available camera phone and stored with the date and time. A sample image is shown on the camera-phone below. Geo-location is requested from the mobile operator location platform. We use the Wanadoo Mappy™ service as a look up table to provide detailed information such as street addresses, cities, states and countries. View full abstract»

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  • Variations2: improving music findability in a digital library through work-centric metadata

    Publication Year: 2004
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (268 KB)  

    Summary form only given. The Variations2 Indiana University Digital Music Library is a large test-bed project funded in part by Phase 2 of the Digital Libraries Initiative, with support from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. This demonstration shows the current state of the Variations2 test-bed software, focusing on the search user interface. Libraries of digitized multimedia content provide access to virtual entities. In the case of music, where there may be many performances and arrangements of a given work, newer metadata models that are less item-centric or book-centric promise superior search capabilities for digital library users. The Variations2 metadata model is one such model. Like the functional requirements for bibliographic records (FRBR) from the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) our model is work-centric. Moreover, we have implemented a digital music library system based on that metadata model. One benefit of the Variations2 search user interface is the use of music-specific search fields such as key or performer. A second benefit is the ability to navigate directly to the desired work within a multiwork item. A third benefit is the introduction of stepwise disambiguation of the user's search criteria. The disambiguation process varies depending both on what fields the user fills in and the actual content of the digital library. Thus our implementation demonstrates some of the benefits of a work-centric, music-specific metadata model. View full abstract»

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  • Using digital library components for biodiversity systems

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (217 KB)  

    Biodiversity information systems (BISs) involve all kinds of heterogeneous data, which include ecological and geographical features. However, available information systems offer very limited support for managing such data in an integrated fashion, and such integration is often based on geographic coordinates alone. Furthermore, such systems do not fully support image content management (e.g., photos of landscapes or living organisms), a requirement of many BIS end-users. In order to meet their needs, these users e.g., biologists, environmental experts - often have to alternate between distinct biodiversity and image information systems to combine information extracted from them. This cumbersome operational procedure is forced on users by lack of interoperability among these systems. This hampers the addition of new data sources, as well as cooperation among scientists. The approach provided in this project to meet these issues is based on taking advantage of advances in digital library (DL) innovations to integrate networked collections of heterogeneous data. It focuses on creating the basis for a biodiversity information system under the digital library perspective, combining new techniques of content-based image retrieval and database query processing mechanisms. This approach solves the problem of system switching, and provides users with a flexible platform from which to tailor a BIS to their needs. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamically generating conceptual browsing interfaces for digital libraries

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (211 KB)  

    A system is described that supports the dynamic generation of conceptual browsing interfaces. These interfaces are comprised of interacting visual components that contain different views onto a concept space that can be modeled as nodes and links. This algorithm uses a combined approach of tree-based processing with a grid-based drawing system to automatically generate the visual components. This algorithm is part of a larger digital library service, the NSDL Strand Map Service, which aims to provide educators and learners with conceptual browsing interfaces that help them to locate and use learning resources in educational digital libraries. View full abstract»

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  • Building metadata-based navigation using semantic Web standards: the Dublin Core 2003 Conference Proceedings

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (210 KB)  

    Summary form only given. One of the touted benefits of the semantic Web is that it will make searches more precise and efficient by leveraging metadata about Web-delivered content. Faceted metadata retrieval is an approach to providing users access to large collections of semistructured data and content that promises an improvement in usability over that available using more traditional search methods. We illustrate how the online proceedings for the 2003 Dublin Core Conference were implemented by combining traditional and innovative knowledge organization techniques. The 2003 Dublin Core Conference Proceedings served as a test-bed for generating a faceted metadata retrieval interface from instance metadata, ontologies, and controlled vocabularies expressed in RDF and RDF Schema. We share lessons learned in the design and implementation of the proceedings, and in particular focus on emerging best practices for representing and sharing metadata using Dublin Core Metadata recommendations, new interpretations of traditional Library and Information Science information retrieval techniques, and implementations of semantic Web standards. View full abstract»

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  • An OAI compliant content-based image search component

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (286 KB)  

    Summary form only given. Advances in data storage and image acquisition technologies have enabled the creation of large image datasets. In order to deal with these data, appropriate information systems (e.g., image digital libraries) have been developed to efficiently manage such collections. One of the most common retrieval approaches is to employ so-called content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. Basically, these systems try to retrieve images similar to a user-defined pattern (e.g., image example). Their goal is to support image retrieval based on content properties (e.g., shape, color, or texture), which are often encoded in terms of image descriptors. This demonstration presents a new CBIR system based on configurable components. The main novelty resides in its content-based image search component (CBISC) that supports queries on image collections. CBISC is based on the OAI (H. Suleman et al. (2003)) principles, and thus provides an easy-to-install search engine to support querying images by content. As with the OAI protocol, queries are posed via HTTP requests and the responses are encoded in XML. View full abstract»

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  • Using digital libraries to build educational communities: the ChemCollective

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (213 KB)  

    The ChemCollective is a new project in the targeted research track of the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). The project (http://www.chemcollective.org) was launched in spring 2004 at the National American Chemical Society (ACS) and National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) meetings. The research goal is to explore the degree to which digital library structures can attract and support a community of educators working towards a common vision of educational reform. View full abstract»

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  • Taking Internet's temperature: prescriptions for the 21st century

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB)  

    Summary form only given. We discuss the current state of the Internet, near term projections, the importance of security and privacy on the Internet especially for health care applications, the impact of RFID, and the effect of Internet-enabling everything ("at home, in your car, in the operating room, in the office, and all the stuff you hang on your body"). View full abstract»

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  • How people describe their image information needs: a grounded theory analysis of visual arts queries

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 47 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB)  

    When people are looking for visual arts information - information related to images - how do they characterize their needs? We analyze a set of 404 queries to identify the attributes that people provide to the Google Answers ™ 'ask an expert' online reference system. The results suggest directions to take in developing an effective organization and features for an image digital library. View full abstract»

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  • Accessing the Alexandria Digital Library from geographic information systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 74 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (372 KB)  

    We describe two experimental desktop library clients that offer improved access to geospatial data via the Alexandria Digital Library (ADL): ArcADL, an extension to ESRI's ArcView GIS, and vtADL, an extension to the Virtual Terrain Project's Enviro terrain visualization package. ArcADL provides a simplified user interface to ADL's powerful underlying distributed geospatial search technology. Both clients use the ADL Access Framework to access library data that is available in multiple formats and retrievable by multiple methods. Issues common to both clients and future scenarios are also considered. View full abstract»

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  • Cybersecurity considerations for digital libraries in an era of pervasive computing

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB)  

    Information technology is becoming pervasive in our society and for most people it is an unavoidable part of everyday life. This talk traces this evolution to the present day and make projections to an era later this decade when the prevailing system architecture may consist of information utilities accessed intuitively through a wide variety of specialized information appliances, many of them mobile. This talk explore the challenges involved in detecting, preventing and mitigating malicious attacks by those seeking to disrupt the global information infrastructure, and highlight research efforts needed to solve them. View full abstract»

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  • Visiting virtual reality museum exhibits

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    Summary form only given. Virtual museums provide ways to capture the content of a real museum in a digital (electronic) form and make this digital form more universally available. This exhibit demonstrates a novel method for digitally recording entire museum exhibits and allowing them to be explored in virtual reality. The methodology allows anyone with access to the Internet or a PC to experience anywhere, anytime, any part of the museum's collection or exhibits (past, present and future). Users can explore the museum exhibits in a virtual reality that is both spatially accurate and visually compelling. All objects and 3D scenes are seen in precise full color photographic quality detail. The scene and objects are polygonal meshes representing the surfaces of objects as recorded by a laser range finder. This permits making measurements directly on the scene with millimeter precision. The methodology, its application to capturing museum exhibits, and examples of exhibits recorded using this technique is demonstrated on a laptop PC. Visitors to the demonstration are able to learn about the process of digitizing 3D environments like museum exhibits and creating virtual reality environments from them. Place themselves in one of three virtual reality exhibits and explore the multiple rooms and artifacts comprising the exhibits (Ackland Art Museum, living room, Clue murder scene). View full abstract»

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  • How geography professors select materials for classroom lectures: implications for the design of digital libraries

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 179 - 185
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    A goal of the Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype (ADEPT) project is to make primary resources in geography useful for undergraduate instruction in ways that promote inquiry learning. The ADEPT education and evaluation team interviewed professors about their use of geography information as they prepare for class lectures, as compared to their research activities. We found that professors desired the ability to search by concept (erosion, continental drift, etc.) as well as geographic location, and that personal research collections were an important source of instructional materials. Resources in geospatial digital libraries are typically described by location, but are rarely described by concept or educational application. This paper presents implications for the design of an educational digital library from our observations of the lecture preparation process. Findings include functionality requirements for digital libraries and implications for the notion of digital libraries as a shared information environment. The functional requirements include definitions and enhancements of searching capabilities, the ability to contribute and to share personal collections of resources, and the capability to manipulate data and images. View full abstract»

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  • Geographic information retrieval (GIR) ranking methods for digital libraries

    Publication Year: 2004
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (245 KB)  

    This demo presents results from an evaluation of algorithms for ranking results by probability of relevance for geographic information retrieval (GIR) applications. We demonstrate an algorithm for GIR ranking based on logistic regression from samples of the test collection. We also show the effects of different representations of the geographic regions being searched, including minimum bounding rectangles, convex hulls, and complex polygons. View full abstract»

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  • Discovery of retrograde and inverted themes for indexing musical scores

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 252 - 253
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB)  

    This paper describes extensions to a musical score indexing program that enable it to discover sequences of notes that appear in retrograde and/or inverted form. The program was tested over a set of 50 orchestral movements by several composers of the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic periods. The retrograde and inversion discovery algorithm added an average of 3.76 patterns per movement to the index, increasing the number of notes in the index by 6.5%, and the number of entries by 8.2%. Among the patterns added to the index were variations of 3 themes in retrograde, 5 themes in inversion, and 3 themes in retrograde inversion. View full abstract»

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  • Digital trail libraries

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 63 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1340 KB)  

    We propose the idea of an online, user submitted digital library of recreation trails. Digital libraries of trails offer advantages over paper guidebooks in that they are more accurate, dynamic and not limited to the experience of the author(s). The basic representation of a trail is a GPS track log, recorded as recreators travel on trails. As users complete trips, the GPS track logs of their trips are submitted to the central library voluntarily. A major problem is that track logs will overlap and intersect each other. We present a method for the combination of overlapping and intersecting GPS track logs to create a network of GPS trails. Each trail segment in the network can then be characterized by automatic and manual means, producing a digital library of trails. We also describe the TopoFusion system which creates, manages and visualizes GPS data, including GPS networks. View full abstract»

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  • The Digital IdeaKeeper: integrating digital libraries with a scaffolded environment for online inquiry

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    Online inquiry is an important way of engaging learners in information-rich activities using online sources to explore questions in different fields, such as science. Online inquiry involves a set of interrelated activities, such as planning an investigation; seeking, analyzing, and making sense of online information; and synthesizing information into a final argument. However, learners may encounter several obstacles in trying to tackle an open-ended, complex process like online inquiry. Therefore, using a learner-centered design approach, we are developing the Digital IdeaKeeper environment to extend digital libraries by integrating different tools and incorporating different scaffolding approaches to help learners effectively engage in online inquiry. View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative extensions for the UpLib system

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 239 - 240
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB)  

    The UpLib personal digital library system is specifically designed for secure use by a single individual. However, collaborative operation of multiple UpLib repositories is still possible. This paper describes two mechanisms that have been added to UpLib to facilitate community building around individual document collections. View full abstract»

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  • The Alexandria Digital Library and the Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype

    Publication Year: 2004
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB)  

    The Alexandria Digital Library, together with its follow-on - the Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype Project - is one of the flagship projects of the NSF/NASAA/...Digital Library Initiative. Uniquely among these projects, ADL is a georeferenced library i.e. a library in which the principal mode of access to information is by specifying the location of the information on the surface of the Earth. The most immediate application of this technology is in support of a library of maps, aerial photographs and remote sensing images, and ADL is now run as an operational service by UCSB's map and image library, one of the largest such libraries in the US. View full abstract»

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  • Improving video browsing with an eye-tracking evaluation of feature-based color bars

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 49 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB)  

    This paper explains a method for leveraging the standard video timeline widget as an interactive visualization of image features. An eye-tracking experiment is described with results that indicate that such a widget increases task efficiency without increasing complexity while being easily learned by experiment participants. View full abstract»

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  • Digital libraries and educational practice: a case for new models

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 170 - 178
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (290 KB)  

    Educational digital libraries can benefit from theoretical and methodological approaches that enable lessons learned from design and evaluation projects performed in one particular setting to be applied to other settings within the library network. Three promising advances in design theory are reviewed - reference tasks, design experiments, and design genres. Each approach advocates the creation of 'intermediate' constructs as vehicles for knowledge building and knowledge sharing across design and research projects. One purpose of an intermediate construct is to formulate finer-grained models that describe and explain the relationship between key design features and the cognitive and social dimensions of the context of use. Three models are proposed and used as thought experiments to analyze the utility of these approaches to educational digital library design and evaluation: digital libraries as cognitive tools, component repositories, and knowledge networks. View full abstract»

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