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Object-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing, 2004. Proceedings. Seventh IEEE International Symposium on

Date 14-14 May 2004

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  • Proceedings. Seventh International Symposium on Object-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing

    Publication Year: 2004
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  • [Blank page]

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): ii
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  • Proceedings Seventh IEEE International Symposium on Object-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): iii
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  • Proceedings Seventh IEEE International Symposium on Object-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing Copyright Page

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): iv
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  • Proceedings Seventh IEEE International Symposium on Object-Oriented Real-Time Distributed Computing Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): v - viii
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  • Message from the Symposium Co-Chairs

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): ix
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  • Message from the Program Co-Chairs

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): x
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  • Committees

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): xi - xii
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  • Secondary reviewers

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): xiii
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  • Composition of component services

    Publication Year: 2004
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1265 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We consider a component to be an encapsulated hardware-software unit that can be used as a building block in the construction of a larger system and that delivers a specified service across a component interface. The problem of composition of a set of components can be broken down into the following two subproblems, the composition of the component services and the incorporation of the components into an integrated software/hardware architecture. We focus on the problem of component service composition View full abstract»

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  • Applying RT-CORBA in nuclear power plant simulators

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 7 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The application of new technologies and programming tools represents a challenge and an economic risk for companies, which not all are prepared to assume. We present the application of RT-CORBA in the development of software for nuclear power plant simulators used for the training of future operators in a safe way. The developed software has allowed the adaptation of previous simulation software to new methodologies and standards; and the creation of new applications, aiming at the building of reusable components with real-time constraints in future projects View full abstract»

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  • Project Golden Gate: towards real-time Java in space missions

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 15 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1446 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Planetary science missions, such as those that explore Mars and Saturn, employ a variety of spacecraft such as arbiters, landers, probes, and rovers. Each of these kinds of spacecraft depends on embedded real-time control systems - systems that are increasingly being asked to do more as challenging new mission concepts are proposed. For both systems engineers and software engineers the large challenges are in analysis, design and verification of complex control systems that run on relatively limited processors. Project Golden Gate - a collaboration among NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Sun Microsystems Laboratory, and Carnegie Mellon University - is exploring those challenges in the context of real-time Java applied to space mission software. This paper describes the problem domain and our experimentation with the first commercial implementation of the real time specification for Java. The two main issues explored in this report are: (I) the effect of RTSJ's nonheap memory on the programming model, and (2) performance benchmarking of RTSJ/Linux relative to C++/VxWorks View full abstract»

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  • A hard look at hard real-time garbage collection

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 23 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1349 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author reviews the literature on the use of garbage collection in real-time systems. The author concentrates on hard real-time systems, where we ideally construct mathematical proofs of correctness and of timing properties. In particular, the author examines the interaction of overheads imposed on mutator operations by garbage collection algorithms on worst-case execution time analyses of real-time threads performing those operations. In recent years there has been a shift from work-based to time-based approaches. This paper explains and motivates this shift, and reviews examples, problems, and advantages of example algorithms from each approach. Finally, the author examines what extensions to programming verification technology might be necessary to prove that sufficient memory space exists to run a real-time system with the same rigor that one proves that sufficient time exists in a real-time schedule View full abstract»

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  • The impact of realtime garbage collection on realtime Java programming

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1355 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Extensions like the real-time specification for Java (RTSJ) enable the use of Java in more and more time-critical application domains. The RTSJ enables the development of realtime code in Java even though a classical garbage collector causes unpredictable pauses to non-realtime code. We give an overview of how a modern realtime garbage collectors operates. It presents the impact the presence of such a realtime garbage collector has on the development of complex applications that need to perform time-critical and nontime-critical tasks. The use of realtime garbage collection technology simplifies the application development even in systems that do not use dynamic memory allocation within realtime code View full abstract»

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  • A UML-based methodology for the system design of a wireless LAN prototype

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 45 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1331 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a new methodology for the system design and development of wireless network protocols. The proposed methodology used UML and its real-time extensions at its basis. This system design methodology formalizes the system specification and validation phases. Furthermore, wireless system design is enhanced by the concept of high-level system codesign, which can be achieved by the use of UML in the system design. The presented methodology has been applied to the design of the industrial prototype implementation of a wireless network node based on the HIPERLAN/2 standard. The system design of the HIPERLAN/2 prototype is presented in details, with special information given on the system architecture and the implementation of the hardware and software parts of the system. The application of the presented system methodology helped in the reduction of the development time and effort for the HIPERLAN/2 prototype View full abstract»

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  • Performance modeling and validation of a software system in a RT-UML-based simulative environment

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 52 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1640 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The performance validation of software systems is becoming a crucial activity of the software development process. This is mostly due to the resource sharing and the remote deployment of software objects that may introduce critical delays in performance indices like the system response time. Hard and soft real-time systems are particularly affected from performance issues, therefore the ability to model and validate this attribute may become an extra value in software development environments. In this paper we introduce a framework to model performance aspects using the real-time object modeling (ROOM) notation. We devise a standard approach to represent hardware resources (such as CPUs and disks), to formulate resource requests of software objects, and to model the delays and the resource contentions that may arise from such requests. The integration of the software model and the resources is made transparent to the software developer by exploiting the integration features of the Rose Real Time (RRT) tool. RRT is based on the real time UML notation that is an implementation of ROOM. We also show an example of application of our framework on a video system case study View full abstract»

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  • UML based design of time triggered systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 60 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1303 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents how the platform-specific development environment of time-triggered (TT) systems can be integrated with a visual design toolkit based on UML. The built-in facilities of UML and the modeling extensions introduced by us enable the unification of the advantages provided by both the embedded development environment and the UML tools. UML offers visual design, automatic code and documentation generation, while the underlying TT development environment offers platform-specific task and communication scheduling and fault tolerance middleware construction. This results in an integrated system that is capable of supporting the entire development within the framework of the UML tool View full abstract»

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  • A UML-based concept for high concurrency: the real-time object

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 64 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1308 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Real-time (RT) applications are designed to control systems that are inherently parallel. For easing development, abstractions are mandatory to model this concurrency. To achieve this goal, the real-time object paradigm is proposed. It is used to demonstrate how to separate functional and concurrency concerns ensuring also high-level abstraction for parallelism modeling View full abstract»

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  • The Real-Time Specification for Java: current status and future work

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 71 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1335 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Real-Time Specification for Java is now about two years old. It has been implemented, formed the basis for research and used in serious applications. Some strengths and weaknesses are becoming clear. This paper reviews the current status of the specification, outlines the challenges ahead and discusses areas where there is likely to be future design work View full abstract»

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  • Cost enforcement and deadline monitoring in the real-time specification for Java

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 78 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modem real-time programming languages and operating systems provide support for monitoring the amount of CPU time a thread consumes. However, no system in widespread use fully integrates this monitoring with the scheduling facilities. The real-time specification for Java (RTSJ) provides an integrated approach to scheduling periodic threads and monitoring their CPU execution time. It supports a cost enforcement model whereby a periodic thread is suspended when it consumes more time than it requested. Version 1.0 of the RTSJ is under specified and it is difficult to understand the full model. This paper clarifies the position and defines the conditions under which a real-time thread is resumed. The model presented is the one that is fully defined in version 1.0.1 of the RTSJ. Unfortunately, version 1.0.1 of the specification will not have a general model for handling cost enforcement and deadline monitoring for all schedulable objects. This paper proposes extensions to the RTSJ that allow the cost enforcement model and deadline monitoring model to be consistently applied across all schedulable objects, and for it to be fully integrated with scheduling View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic real-time reconfiguration on a multithreaded Java-microcontroller

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 86 - 92
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1356 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an approach for dynamic reconfiguration of an embedded Java system in real-time. A class loader executed as a separate thread on a multithreaded microcontroller loads an updated class concurrent to the real-time application. At an uncritical time the application thread switches from the old to the newly updated class. A switching time of 246 clock cycles is determined by a worst-case execution time analysis and checked by measurements on the system. Although this approach is based on a real-time Java system it can be adapted to other languages without extensive additional costs View full abstract»

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  • Restrictions of Java for embedded real-time systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 93 - 100
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Java, with its pragmatic approach to object orientation and enhancements over C, got very popular for desktop and server application development. The productivity increment of up to 40% compared with C++ [E. Quinn et al., (1998)] attracts also embedded systems programmers. However, standard Java is not practical on these usually small devices. This paper presents the status of restricted Java environments for embedded and real-time systems. For missing definitions, additional profiles are proposed. Results of the implementation on a Java processor show that it is possible to develop applications in pure Java on resource constraint devices View full abstract»

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  • Real-time Java scoped memory: design patterns and semantics

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 101 - 110
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1460 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the most powerful features of the real-time specification for Java (RTSJ) is the new memory management model based on scoped memory areas. This model allows programmers to ensure timely reclamation of memory and predictable performance, at the cost of an unfamiliar programming model. We report on experience using and implementing scoped memory areas. Our contribution is twofold: (i) we give an informal introduction to the semantics of the scope management rules of the RTSJ, (ii) we present a number of design patterns for effectively using the scoped memory area API View full abstract»

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  • Modeling dependable systems: what can model driven development contribute and what likely not?

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 113 - 120
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dependability of complex systems is a critical system-level issue, which is still insufficiently tackled today. We propose the adoption of an aggressive model-driven development paradigm (AMDD) to adequately capture globally scoped issues like interoperability and compatibility. AMDD moves most of the recurring problems of compatibility and consistency of a system's design, implementation and evolution from the coding and integration level to the modeling level. In particular it enables an economical treatment of cross-system issues. This approach has proven useful already for the design, realization and test of complex distributed applications. In this paper we discuss the potential and benefits of AMDD and present examples where it is already adopted View full abstract»

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  • Model-based design of embedded systems

    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 113 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1368 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The design of embedded systems is often based on the development of a detailed formal system specification. Considerable effort is spent to ensure the correctness of this specification. However, the actual implementation of the specification and later maintenance is usually done using traditional programming and more often diverges from the specification. To overcome this, it is desirable to derive the implementation directly from the specification. We present an approach for model-based development of embedded systems applying a well-defined UML 2.0 subset with precise execution semantics. Our approach is fully object-oriented, accounts for important aspects like real-time behavior including timeouts, and interrupts. Through the seamless integration of UML sequence diagrams with state diagrams, executable systems can be completely described. The direct execution of such models on a UML virtual machine (UVM) avoids a separate implementation step and increases portability View full abstract»

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