By Topic

Software: Science, Technology and Engineering, 2003. SwSTE '03. Proceedings. IEEE International Conference on

Date 4-5 Nov. 2003

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • A use case-oriented user interface framework

    Page(s): 93 - 100
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (857 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interactive computer applications are sometimes specified by their use cases. These specifications are often formulated in a natural language to enable domain experts, that are not familiar with formal notations, to validate their usefulness. A use case-oriented application framework facilitates manual translation of the natural language specifications into high level code, whose equivalence with the specifications is easy to establish. The purpose is to reduce the costs of both verification and coding. A previous framework of this kind achieved its high level by providing most of the graphical user interface (GUI) code. However, the automatically produced GUI was not always satisfactory. We report on advances achieved by more intelligent user interface construction framework. We introduce a new kind of user interface component, called use case displayer, that enables an almost automatic generation of the user interface of the entire application. The framework was tested in a student laboratory, where it reduced the implementation effort, leaving most of the time (10 of the 15 available weeks) for requirements elicitation, specification development and validation. As expected, the designs produced had a higher level of usability than found in comparable student laboratories. At this stage the framework is useful for student laboratories. More research is required to assess its suitability for industrial use. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Arts'Codes: generation of parallel-automata real-time systems, using a unifying diagrammatic component oriented design methodology

    Page(s): 101 - 110
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB)  

    We present a new method for real-time embedded applications development. The method includes graphic design (Codes), and an execution platform based on parallel automata (Arts). The design method and the execution platform cooperate, so to win clarity in design and robustness in execution. We place our emphasize on the design stage. We introduce new ideas in graphic design to create a framework for the developer in order to arrange his/her thought. The graphic design was influenced by diagrammatic reasoning researches, and their conclusions. The design is component oriented; it is hierarchically homothetic and uses a minimum number of elements in order to minimize cognitive efforts. It unifies in one sort of diagram, the architectural view and the behavioral view of the system to build. A case study is presented in order to picture the method, and to compare the Arts'Codes method to other related ones. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A case study on quality-affecting problems in software engineering projects

    Page(s): 145 - 153
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (267 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software engineering projects normally have many different problems related to all phases of the project. In addition to technical problems, the projects normally suffer from problems caused by management practices and conflicts of interests. We concentrated on quality affecting problems in one software company. The experts of the studied organization agreed on 22 such problems. Almost all of those problems were related to management or human issues, only three had clearly technical causes. We describe those problems and their symptoms, causes and effects. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The road to requirements maturity

    Page(s): 71 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4288 KB)  

    NDS' mission is to be a leading supplier of open end-to-end digital systems and solutions for the secure delivery of entertainment and information to televisions and IP devices. We describe the processes and changes that NDS technologies Israel (NDS-TI) underwent, over the past three years, in order to achieve a culture of requirements management, and discusses the future of the process. We will describe the establishment of the requirements management process, and focus on the leap, from the point of view of return on investment. We will describe the benefits from achieving a working requirements management process and infrastructure: 1. Lessons learned of the RM process 2. Measuring the effectiveness of the RM process and presenting to senior management 3. Senior management setting new business goals. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Towards a standard family of languages for matching patterns in source code

    Page(s): 10 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We make a case for the definition of a family of languages for expressing patterns over both the structure and semantics of source code. Our proposal is unique in that it attempts to provide a unified solution to the problem of searching for patterns in multiple programming languages, and in that it focuses on the semantics of the program rather than on its syntactic structure, all while striving to ensure simplicity and ease-of-use. We present the motivation and the unique difficulties involved in defining such languages, discuss strategies for dealing with these problems, and propose a prototype family of code pattern languages (CPLs). View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Leveraging Web services for information discovery

    Page(s): 123 - 132
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (338 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a novel application of the Web services model for end-user information discovery needs rather than for the traditional business-to-business applications. We describe a specialization of Web services for information providers and demonstrate, through an exemplary unified information discovery console, how consumers can easily customize their favorite information sources, and obtain information from them in a passive or active but always unobtrusive manner. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Offline simulation of a managed system for testing a developed management system

    Page(s): 154 - 163
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (322 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nowadays, there is a growing need for management systems to manage various autonomous systems. These management systems are difficult to test, since their functionality includes exchange of information with various devices and applications via the network communication. There is a need for efficient methods of development and testing to minimize development time and cost. The solution suggested is an offline simulation model, where the simulation and the tested management system are placed on the same computer. This model decouples the testing of the functional aspects of the developed management system from the testing of the communication aspects. This method saves a great deal of human effort, and therefore reduces development time and cost. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Higher quality requirements specifications through natural language patterns

    Page(s): 80 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In most current industrial software engineering projects, the majority of requirements documents are written almost entirely in natural language. However, specifying the requirements in natural language has one major drawback, namely the inherent imprecision, i.e., ambiguity, incompleteness, and inaccuracy, of natural language. Since the requirements document forms the basis of the whole development process, such defects can have severe consequences for the whole project. Therefore, it is important to deal with these defects in a requirements specification right from the start. We present an approach for reducing the problem of imprecision in natural language requirements specifications with the use of natural language patterns, which allow formulating requirements sentences in a less ambiguous, more complete, and more accurate way. To ensure the applicability of our approach we based our patterns on a metamodel for requirements statements for embedded systems. With this metamodel, we ensure that all forms of requirements statements are described with the patterns. We validated the effectiveness of the patterns by using them to rewrite a substantial, previously written, requirements specification to eliminate its imprecisions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Self-stabilizing autonomic recoverer for eventual Byzantine software

    Page(s): 20 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (425 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We suggest to model software package flaws (bugs) by assuming eventual Byzantine behavior of the package. In particular, the package has been tested by the manufacturer for limited length scenarios when started in a predefined initial state; the behavior beyond the tested scenario may be Byzantine. Restarts (reboots) are useful for recovering such systems. We suggest a general yet practical framework and paradigm, based on a theoretical foundation, for the monitoring and restarting of systems. An autonomic recoverer that monitors and restarts the system is proposed, where: the autonomic recoverer is designed to handle different tasks given specific task requirements in the form of predicates and actions. DAG subsystem hierarchy structure is used by a consistency monitoring procedure in order to achieve gracious recovery. The existence and correct functionality of the autonomic recovery is guaranteed by the use of a kernel resident (anchor) process, and the design of the process to be self-stabilizing. The autonomic recoverer uses new scheme for liveness assurance via online monitoring that complements known schemes for online ensuring safety. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software codons for fast program reassembly from components

    Page(s): 43 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (355 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software codons-like their biological counterparts-carry compact information to allow rebuilding programs from software components available in the surroundings. Software codons, contain-besides the usual component interface-outstanding values and lO-signatures computed from sets of input-output pairs. We discuss requirements for fast program reassembly. Software codon generation should be done offline. Candidate components are selected by online automatic software codon matching. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Product management in telecom industry-using requirements management process

    Page(s): 63 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the telecom market becomes more consolidated the industrial key players are forced to release product versions to the market at a growing pace in order to comply with customer requirements and market trends. The time between the initial feedback or requirement originating in the field until the product release and the application satisfying the demand is becoming more critical. Product management's ability to identify the requirements and match them with the company's core SW resources and technological assets is becoming a core competence. NICE Systems is a worldwide leader of multimedia digital recording solutions. NICE products are used by 65% of fortune 100 companies in 30,000 sites including contact centers, financial institutions, public safety sites, ATC (air traffic control) sites, CCTV (closed circuit television) security installations and government markets. We will discuss the implementation of an effective way of managing requirements and how it improved the daily work of product managers as well as their counter-parts in the rest of the company. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using trade-off analysis to uncover links between functional and non-functional requirements in use-case analysis

    Page(s): 3 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (323 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nonfunctional requirements, such as resource usage and performance are of principal importance because they directly affect costs and benefits of developing and deploying software. However, an approach to object oriented analysis that is use-case driven risks neglecting the analysis of nonfunctional requirements. A solution to this problem is proposed based on the observation that some nonfunctional requirements are implemented by functional requirements at a lower level. Trade-off analysis is proposed as a technique to uncover the connection between a nonfunctional requirement and the objects and methods which realize it, thereby enabling a nonfunctional requirement to be analyzed within the framework of a use-case realization. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software analysis process-which order of activities, is preferred? an experimental comparison using FOOM methodology

    Page(s): 111 - 119
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (310 KB)  

    Data modelling and functional modelling are two main activities of the analysis process. Traditional development methodologies usually emphasize functional modelling via dataflow diagrams (DFDs), while object-oriented (OO) methodologies emphasize data modelling via class diagrams. UML includes various techniques for both data (structure) and functional (behavior) modelling which can be utilized in various ways. In fact, different methodologies utilize data modelling and process modelling techniques in different ways and orders. We concerned with the ordering of modelling activities in the analysis stage. Our main question is if it is better to create first a functional model and then a data model, or vice versa? We conduct a comparative experiment in which the two opposing orders are examined. We use the FOOM methodology as a platform for the experiment as it enables the production of both a functional model (hierarchical OO-DFDs) and a data model (an initial class diagram), which are synchronized. The results of the experiment reveal that an analysis process that begins with data modelling provides better products than one that begins with functional modelling. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • eXtreme programming as a framework for student-project coaching in computer science capstone courses

    Page(s): 53 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (234 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present eXtreme programming as a framework for coaching student projects in computer science capstone courses. The work presented here is based on a retrospective process of four coaches who, during the academic year 2002-2003, coached and guided students in the development of software projects within the framework of eXtreme programming. The rationale for this work stems from the fact that software engineering methods are difficult to implement, even in the academia. eXtreme programming, one of the agile software development methods, specifies technical and social guidelines to be followed by software developers during the entire process of software development. As illustrated, these guidelines create a suitable framework for coaching student software projects, as well as for training the coaches themselves for the coaching task. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Integrated process and knowledge management for product definition, development and delivery

    Page(s): 133 - 141
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a software process improvement effort involving the development and deployment of DiME, a proprietary, integrated, collaborative environment for managing product definition, development and delivery processes and information. DiME has been developed as a means to improve and reengineer the management of these processes and facilitate the management of product development information. We describe the situation that led to the DiME initiative, the DiME system and its basic concepts, principles and capabilities, and its enterprise-wide deployment within Comverse. Although the project is still evolving, interim lessons learned from its introduction into the enterprise are presented and related work is discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A survey on testing and reuse

    Page(s): 164 - 173
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (274 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This survey tries to give an account of what type of trends exist today in software reuse and testing. The focus was to try to find out how developers use different tools today and what tools are lacking, especially in the field of reuse and testing. The population came from different types of communities and organizations, to better give us a generalized picture of today's developers. We found that a majority of the developers participating in the survey did not test reused code and other testing methodologies were not used to the extent that the scientific community takes for granted. A more automated approach to testing in combination with code coverage analysis and statistical analysis was found to be needed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • MEDAL: a case tool extension for model-driven software engineering

    Page(s): 33 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The complexity of today's software systems leads to the creation of many related diagrams, representing different viewpoints, different levels of abstraction, and different implementation alternatives. Model-driven software engineering places these models in the center of the development process. Tool support is an essential aspect of model-driven engineering. Of particular interest are model transformation tools: they can facilitate the creation and the evolution of models; they provide a level of traceability between them and they help keeping them synchronized. Unfortunately, currently there are few such tools for UML-based models. We present MEDAL, our model transformation tool. First, we present our viewpoint on model-driven software engineering. Then we describe MEDAL and how we implemented MEDAL on top of rational XDE. Finally, in the last section we show how a Web application development that is based on an architectural framework can be supported by the MEDAL tool. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Software - Science, Technology and Engineering (SwSTE'03)

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (305 KB)  

    The following topics are dealt with: software analysis; software design; software engineering; requirement specification; requirement management; knowledge management; software testing; software quality. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Author index

    Page(s): 174
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (151 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE