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Creating, Connecting and Collaborating Through Computing, 2003. C5 2003. Proceedings. First Conference on

Date 31-31 Jan. 2003

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  • Proceedings First Conference on Creating, Connecting and Collaborating through Computing. C5 2003

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  • Croquet - a collaboration system architecture

    Page(s): 2 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Croquet is a computer software architecture built from the ground up with a focus on deep collaboration between teams of users. It is a totally open, totally free, highly portable extension to the Squeak (Ingalls et al., 2002) programming system. Croquet is a complete development and delivery platform for doing real collaborative work. There is no distinction between the user environment and the development environment. Croquet is focused on interactions inside of a 3D shared space that is used for context based collaboration, where each user can see all of the others and what their current focus is. This allows for an extremely compelling shared experience. A new collaboration architecture/protocol called TeaTime has been developed to enable this functionality. The rendering architecture is built on top of OpenGL (Woo et al., 1999). View full abstract»

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  • Tea-Time museum: Croquet as a browsing and searching environment for digital libraries

    Page(s): 12 - 17
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    In this paper, we describe a research project in the planning stage, called a Tea-Time Museum, that aims at exploration of a new environment for content browsing and multi-user collaboration based on contents. Tea (currently, Croquet) is a next generation collaborative 3D user environment proposed by Reed et al. (2002). Although Croquet is implemented as a collaborative 3D environment for users, new constructs, such as the notion of portals are considered to be key technologies for constructing the next generation digital libraries. We provide our interpretations of Croquet constructs from the view point of hypermedia processing, which will be useful for using Croquet as a basis for constructing a new method of content browsing/searching and a new collaborative (social) search based on Web content. View full abstract»

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  • SuperSwiki - bringing collaboration to the class room

    Page(s): 18 - 21
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    SuperSwiki is not yet a well defined term. Its origins go back to Ward Cunningham's Wiki and its Squeak variant, the Swiki. It provides a place to share and edit Web pages, files, and, in case of the SuperSwiki, Squeak projects. The concept of a (Super)Swiki lends itself very well to facilitate collaboration in the classroom, on a campus or even across the Internet. It is easy to set up and all that is needed on the client side is a Web browser (and Squeak). This paper illustrates some of the key ideas behind SuperSwikis, how to run and use them, and considers some existing installations. View full abstract»

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  • Collaborative end-user computing with snowball

    Page(s): 22 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (437 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Snowball is a visual tool that helps analyze, visualize and visually manipulate hierarchical structures in Squeak. Beyond its original aim of assisting developers to implement systems quicker, recent additions to Snowball can make it a viable collaborative tool for end-users as well. This paper focuses on innovations of Snowball that aim to make it an easy to use computational tool for end-users of various backgrounds. End-user computing is done via visual computation trees, which can be linked across the Internet. View full abstract»

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  • NetMorph - an intuitive mobile object system

    Page(s): 32 - 39
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    NetMorph is a mobile object system that provides a seamless integration of network and desktop. We introduce the notion of network location to desktop objects. By combining desktop 2D coordinates with network locations, NetMorph provides free intuitive cyber spaces. It helps computer beginners to acquire skills of network computing in a very natural way. View full abstract»

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  • Introducing Alice to a Squeak wonderland

    Page(s): 40 - 43
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    The Alice project, started at the University of Virginia by Randy Pausch and now continuing at Carnegie Mellon University, is designed to simplify the process of building interactive 3D worlds so that novices without extensive training can build interesting worlds. In this paper I describe some of the aspects of Squeak Alice, a version of the Alice tool that I ported to Squeak, an open-source descendant of Smalltalk. Because Squeak Alice applies many of the lessons learned from Alice, I describe some of those lessons. Rather than dwelling on the similarities between the two systems, I then focus on describing some of the architectural, surface, and functional differences between Squeak Alice and Alice, and I describe some of the new capabilities that Squeak Alice provides. View full abstract»

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  • The design and implementation of multilingualized Squeak

    Page(s): 44 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the design and implementation of multilingualization ("m17n") of a dynamic object-oriented environment called Squeak. The goal of this project is to provide a collaborative and late-bound environment where the users can use many different natural languages and characters. Squeak is a highly portable implementation of a dynamic objects environment and it is a good starting point toward the future collaborative environment. However, its text related classes lack the ability to handle natural languages that require extended character sets such as Arabic, Chinese, Greek, Korean, and Japanese. We have been implementing the multilingualization extension to Squeak. The extension we wrote can be classified as follows: 1) new character and string representations for extended character sets, 2) keyboard input and the file out of multilingual text mechanism, 3) flexible text composition mechanism, 4) extended font handling mechanisms including dynamic font loading and outline font handling, 5) higher level application changes including a Japanese version of SqueakToys. The resulting environment has the following characteristics: 1) various natural languages can be used in the same context, 2) the pixels on screen, including the appearance of characters can be completely controlled by the program, 3) decent word processing facility for a mixture of multiple languages, 4) existing Squeak capability, such as remote collaborative mechanism will be integrated with it, 5) small memory footprint requirement. View full abstract»

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  • Development of Smalltalk in China

    Page(s): 52 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smalltalk is a well-known object-oriented programming language. In the late 1980s, we developed Smalltalk on a DEC VAX/8600 computer to promote education and research of object-oriented programming in China. Smalltalk can also be used as the language of object-oriented database e.g., Gemstone. However, an object-oriented data model makes it hard to define views and handle role multiplicity as well as object migration. We extended the object-oriented data model with the new concepts of deputy objects and deputy classes. The new model is called the object deputy model and can provide a unified realization of object views, roles and migration. It can be implemented in Smalltalk. In China, there are other Smalltalk-related research projects such as the Smalltalk program understanding support system and Chinese character information processing in Smalltalk. We introduce these research works. View full abstract»

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  • Expanding the envelope of the object oriented approach

    Page(s): 60 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (551 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we will discuss a new approach to modeling information systems, namely Fuzzy Object and Behavior Modeling (FOBM) technique. FOBM is a fusion of the object-oriented approach with soft computing techniques. It is especially useful for dealing with increased complexity and noisy, incomplete and vague environments and mainly target areas such as 3D animation, robotics and intelligent autonomous agents. FOBM introduces many new concepts and integrates and enhances some existing ones. Concepts highlighted in this paper include message and event broadcasting, weighing and attenuation, continuous messages with emitters and sensors, degrees of membership, presence and relationships, continuously variable objects, and tolerant environments. Some of these concepts are demonstrated using a simple FOBM framework implemented in Squeak. View full abstract»

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  • A model of recording students' actions for elementary education with Squeak

    Page(s): 68 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In education, it is very important for teachers to grasp students' activities. To support teachers, we suggest that all students' actions should be automatically recorded. These learning histories are required to be flexible for various uses such as personal recommendations, analysis, and visualizations. For this requirement, we designed a recording model by connecting action history model and MVC model on Squeak environments. View full abstract»

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  • The agent Morph - the implementation of information agent on Squeak and Croquet

    Page(s): 72 - 73
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    This is about the implementation of a cooperative information-gathering agent as Morph on Squeak. The purpose of this project is to make an agent that solves this point on Squeak. This agent includes three main functions. First, it collects information. Second, it shows information to the user, who selects from it, and then properly stores it. Lastly, which is also a characteristic, it allows fellow agents that have received information disclosure range and permission from the user exchange information to further refine it. With these three functioning continually, the circulation of knowledge occurs, and the Internet can become a true knowledge processor. View full abstract»

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  • A conceptual framework for learning experience design

    Page(s): 76 - 83
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    This paper describes our approach of utilizing a computational environment to apply a learner's learning process as a first class object. With this approach, the learner's learning process can be used as communicative media among learners and teachers or learning content object providers (LCOPs). We argue that the design of a computer system is as equally crucial as the selection of an instructional method. The selection of which instructional method to apply and the design of a computer system together form a learning environment, which determines a learner's learning experience. This paper first discusses the learning experience design approach for the development of computer technology in general. Then we present a particular design of learning experience, where learners and LCOPs can communicate with each other via learning materials in the computational environment. We have developed an architectural framework for the learning experience, and applied the framework to three different educational settings. View full abstract»

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  • A design for computer supported collaborative learning using concerns oriented model

    Page(s): 89 - 95
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    This paper describes a new technique and interface named Concerns Oriented Modeling to design cognitive user models and distributed application architecture for computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL). It is based on Linda, a coordination model for distributed network systems. View full abstract»

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  • Initial experiences of ALAN-K: an Advanced LeArning Network in Kyoto

    Page(s): 96 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (355 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the start-up phase of the ALAN-K (Advanced LeArning Network in Kyoto) project, which is part of a major effort to create new learning environments for elementary, junior high and high school students in Kyoto, Japan. Our visions of digitally fluent and creative citizens are largely influenced by the visions, ideas, and experiences of Alan Kay and his colleagues. We view the Squeak system (Ingalls et al., 1997; Guzdial and Rose, 2002) as powerful learning tools and media for enabling both active independent learning and collaboration. A series of Squeak workshops were designed and conducted at two elementary schools, which will be the basis for designing further activities. View full abstract»

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  • KJ editor for creative work support and collaboration

    Page(s): 104 - 109
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (855 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    KJ method, which was developed for creative activity support, uses cards for making a conceptual map from brainstorming. Some comments are made for usefulness of diagrams. A card-handling editor for supporting the method was developed. In this editor, direct scrolling capability named "panning" was introduced. Although it is now widely used in video games, it has a limitation caused from the saccadic suppression of human eyes. View full abstract»

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  • LanguageGame - an interactive parser generator

    Page(s): 110 - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (254 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    LanguageGame is a tool for a non-professional computer user to make a new programming language. Playing with LanguageGame allows a user to make an original new programming language. In order to give an instruction to a computer, now we have many ways such as selecting menu, push button, drag icon or so. Recent researches of computer user interface have developed various methods of interacting with computer. Above all, with using WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) way, user interface becomes very rich and useful for non-engineer users. But yet, the most fundamental way of having a dialog with computer is to input a sequence of command kind of programming language. Using WYSIWIG style has advantages when a user uses a computer instead of real paper. But to deal with more abstract or involved matter, using a programming language has more benefit because symbols are more stable and we can use powerful idea as a recursiveness or a reference with such language. The importance of programming language could never change however GUI will be more improved. There are various languages in the world, and there are many interesting aspects and tastes in each language. As the grammars of the programming language are very interesting, developing a language must be more fun. Of course making a language seemed to be difficult. And it was planned to develop a parser generator that common people can make their own language easily. A parser generator is one of the most basic software in computer. Historically, various programming languages have been developed. And to make developing their parser easily, the technique of automatic parser generation was found. Now the parser generator becomes established technology. LanguageGame is such a parser generator that has graphical user interface. Contrary to popular professional parser generator like yacc/lex in UNIX platform, it is intended to use non-professional computer users, students and children. Playing with LanguageGame, users can - earn and build simple parser with pretty graphical interface, drag-and-drop and graphical syntax tree representation. In current implementation, LanguageGame is developed on Squeak - a free open environment of Smalltalk. Hereby, the user grammar with LanguageGame can use all objects like a sketch and sound in Squeak. View full abstract»

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  • Computer learning system for pre-school-age children based on a haptized model railway

    Page(s): 118 - 119
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (219 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This research is aimed to develop a new methodology and its supporting technologies for pre-school-age children to learn about computation and programming through hands-on playing experience with toys. It allows children to acquire the concept and the knowledge of computation and programming by playing with model railway toy. The final aim of the research is to establish the ladder rung toward great scientist and engineer development through education in the pre-school-age. View full abstract»

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  • Machine cycle CPU simulator for educational use based on Squeak environment

    Page(s): 120 - 121
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A machine cycle CPU simulator is developed on the Squeak environment for educational use. The developed simulator is able to show hardware behavior in CPU at each system clock. Any component of the simulator is implemented as a Morphic object in Squeak. The developed simulator is examined by execution of example programs and correct behaviors of their executions are confirmed. View full abstract»

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  • Nigari system - environment where students learn programming by creating animations

    Page(s): 122 - 123
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    There are too many things to learn when novice students develop programs in well-known languages, such as Java or C. To support learning programming languages, we developed Nigari System, a programming environment. The language is simpler than usual ones, and the developing environment enables students make attractive applications, animations or games. As an experiment, we applied Nigari System for a class of programming in Waseda University and report the result of the experiment. View full abstract»

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  • Small Squeaking in Korea

    Page(s): 124 - 125
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    Squeak (Smalltalk language) is not widely known in Korea. A few people are taking an interest in Squeak, but there are not enough resources to quench their thirst for knowledge. In spite of harsh environments, the sounds of squeaking are reverberating silently but happily. View full abstract»

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  • Squeak workshop experiences in Kyoto

    Page(s): 126 - 127
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    This poster presentation introduces our first Squeak workshops offered in the context of the ALAN-K (Advanced LeArning Network in Kyoto) project (Konomi and Karuno, 2003) which is part of a major effort to create a new learning environment for elementary, junior high and high school students in Kyoto, Japan. View full abstract»

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  • The Mobile-based learning (MBL) in Japan

    Page(s): 128 - 129
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    The latest breakthrough in the cellular phone technology had opened the door to new learning possibility in Japan. Today, about 73 million mobile phones are subscribed and about 3/4 of those mobile phones are capable of browsing mobile Internet in Japan. The paper briefly explains a mobile-based learning (MBL) practice, which takes place in Japan. Also, the paper attempts to see how it differs from Web-based training (WBT) from a system designer's point of view. View full abstract»

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  • Toward a seamless learning environment

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    A new plan and a design concept to develop an e-Learning environment using Squeak, is proposed. The following key points for motivation design are described: Flexibility between learners and teachers, and portability for field environment. View full abstract»

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  • We would like to use Squeak as the instrument for expression!

    Page(s): 131 - 132
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    At Visual Arts College Osaka, we are exploring ways to use the computer as an instrument for expressing art. Usually, our students learn to create works of Web, CD-ROM and video content using the computer. We had been thinking about using Squeak for a while, however, it was not easy to introduce Squeak in our classes because of the issues relevant to the need of using the Japanese language in Squeak and the need of Japanese manuals. Fortunately, we met with Mr. Kazuhiro Abe in May 2002, who was developing a Japanese edition of Squeak. We decided to use Squeak in our class for 3 months aiming at making Squeak "our instruments". This attempt was experimental. View full abstract»

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