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Audio and Electroacoustics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date September 1967

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): 0
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial: G-AE affiliates

    Page(s): 119
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Speech processing techniques and applications

    Page(s): 120 - 126
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    The processing of speech involves the analysis, coding, decoding, and synthesis of speech sounds. The speech analyzer consists of normalizers, syllable and syblet segmenters, sound recognizers, sequencers, adapters, and memories which convert the speech elements into a code. The speech synthesizer converts the code to speech by reproducing prerecorded speech elements. There are many applications for the speech analyzer and synthesizer ranging from limited vocabulary to complete communication systems. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental, limited vocabulary, speech recognizer

    Page(s): 127 - 130
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    An experimental speech recognizer is described which exhibits a high level of performance and is practical in terms of size, weight, cost, and power consumption. High recognition performance is achieved by employing the limited vocabulary approach and utilizing a simple set of parameter extractors based upon the single equivalent formant theory conceived and developed by one of the authors. Recognition logic for a vocabulary word consists of circuitry for testing the levels and movements of three parameter waveforms to determine whether they conform to the conditions of acceptability for the particular word as found from parameter data for a large number of speakers. The recognizer presently responds to the spoken digits OH through NINE with a recognition accuracy of 90 percent and an error rate of one percent on live utterances by speakers who contributed the design samples, and only slightly lower than this on other male speakers of similar speech characteristics. The recognizer occupies a volume of less than 0.8 cubic foot exclusive of microphone, indicator, and power supplies, consumes less than 30 watts, and shows promise of a very low eventual cost per word. View full abstract»

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  • An acoustical application of the logarithmic transformation to a normally distributed random variable

    Page(s): 141 - 143
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    The logarithmic transformation,Y=a log X, of the normally distributed random variableXis discussed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the field of acoustical noise measurements. The probability density function, mean value, and standard deviation ofYare derived, and a graphical method for estimating its 95th and 97.72nd percentiles is presented. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors and back cover

    Page(s): c4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The squad radio exponential horn and driver

    Page(s): 136 - 140
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    The effectiveness of the helmet-mounted Squad Radio AN/PRR-9 in a battlefield environment is largely determined by the capability of the receiver to deliver adequate sound power to the ear of the user without impairing his ability to hear sounds around him. During the development of the Squad Radio receiver conducted by the United States Army Electronic Research and Development Laboratories in conjunction with the Delco Radio Division of General Motors, emphasis was placed on finding a solution to this problem. High audio power could not be used to provide necessary sound power levels due to the size, weight, and battery drain limitations of the receiver. Therefore, effort was placed in optimizing the efficiency of conversion of electrical audio power to acoustical power. The result of this effort is a low-cost, compact, lightweight exponential horn-driver unit that will provide enough sound power to the user's ear to overcome anticipated battlefield noise. A computer program was used to analyze and optimize the driver and horn parameters for this application. This paper is a discussion of the detailed requirements of the horn-driver unit, the methods used in its development, and the performance of the final units. View full abstract»

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  • Systems for compressing the bandwith of speech

    Page(s): 131 - 136
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    Speech bandwidth compression is based on the present knowledge of human speech production and perception. This is the first in a series of papers reviewing the articulatory, acoustic, and network description of speech and discusses the bandpass compressor, which is a simple example of a bandwidth saving device. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production in 1973. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing.

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