Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, single article purchases and IEEE account management will be unavailable from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM ET (12:00 - 21:00 UTC). We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Solid-State Circuits Conference. Digest of Technical Papers. 1958 IEEE International

Date 20-21 Feb. 1958

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): f1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (63 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Linear-selection, core-memory techniques using transistors

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 3 - 4
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transistor resistor logic circuit analysis

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 5 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (214 KB)  

    Transistor Resistor Locic (TRL) merits consideration as a form of semiconductor logical circuitry for data-processing systems as a consequence of its inherent simplicity, reliability and economy. The basic TRL building block and flip-flop are shown. The building block is seen to consist of a resistor OR gate followed by an inverting transistor amplifier. Any combinational logic function can be implemented using this block alone. The flip-flop consists of two building blocks connected back to back. The TRL circuit has found application in several relatively slow-speed digital systems. It is the purpose of this paper to present the results of a new look at TRL using several new high-speed, high-gain transistors. It is shown that the excellent properties of these transistors can be effectively exploited with TRL circuits operating economically and reliably at the moderately high speeds required in many digital systems. The analysis which follows primarily involves current relationships, since the operation of TRL circuits involves the switching of nearly constant current sources. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ten megapulse transistorized pulse circuits for computer application

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 7 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (337 KB)  

    Having demonstrated the overall feasibility of pulse circuitry in a parallel-organized computer, the next requirement was to build pulse-circuits for a model application. To guide the engineer in this effort, design ground-rules were established. A -10-volt power supply and 10-megapulse operation were immediately determined. An additional requirement specified that the circuits use high-speed PNP drift transistors and be capable of driving six 70-ohm coaxial lines. Pulses were 1-volt negative 1/2-sine wave, with a maximum width of 40 millimicroseconds. To optimize life, junction-temperature was limited to 60??C. A summary of the design ground-rules is shown. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-speed, graded-base transistor, digital-circuit techniques

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 9 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    This work suggests switching circuit configurations applicable to high-speed data processing systems and utilizing graded-base transistors. The article is oriented toward obtaining the maximum performance (speed wise) from transistors as a circuit means to a system end, a problem that arises often in large system-minded laboratories, and therefore emphasis is placed upon fundamental considerations such as total circuit performance, flexibility, availability of components; etc. and not exact circuit values and detailed circuit analysis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Higher-speed computer circuits

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 12 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    TWO DISTINCT LINES of attack are available for advancing the frontier in high-speed switching work. The most straightforward, but not necessarily easiest, method is to develop faster devices. This paper is devoted to the second method, that of devising circuits which better utilize the capabilities of existing devices. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Survey of noise in semiconductor diodes and triodes

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (118 KB)  

    Summary form only given. Shot noise in semiconductor diodes and triodes is white at low frequencies and increases at high frequencies. The simple assumption that fluctuations in electron-hole-pair creations, motions, and recombinations are perfectly random permits a satisfactory understanding of this noise. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Review of several solid-state devices and their applications

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New configurations in non-saturating complementary current switching circuits

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 18 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (289 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A method of designing transistor avalanche circuits with application to a sensitive transistor oscilloscope

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 21 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (346 KB)  

    THE OPERATION of a junction transistor in the avalanche mode bears a strong resemblance to that of the point-contact transistor. Unfortunately, the resemblance extends to the variation in characteristics between specimens, and this paper presents a simple method of designing avalanche circuits, based on a method developed for point-contact circuits, which will operate with any transistor without requiring adjustment. As an example the basic avalanche circuits are extended to an oscilloscope which uses a total of 11 transistors. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The use of a junction transistor as a three-terminal temporary memory for digital circuits

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 24 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (231 KB)  

    THE PHENOMENON of carrier storage in junction transistors has generally been looked upon as one of their undesirable characteristics. Many authors have described both the effect and circuits to minimize it, but it is the aim of this paper to show that carrier storage when controlled can provide a three-terminal temporary memory for digital computing circuits of a type not provided by any other single electronic component. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transistor bilateral switches

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 26 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (229 KB)  

    THE VALUABLE PROPERTIES of transistors as efficient switching elements are well known and the use of transistors in digital circuits has become widespread. An allied area receiving much less attention is the use of transistors in ac signal switching. This paper discusses the transistor characteristics required for bilateral switching and circuit techniques developed to exploit these characteristics. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A two-transistor gate for time-division switching

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 28 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB)  

    A bilateral balanced solid-state gate, suitable for use in a pulse amplitude modulated time-division telephone switching system, is described. The gate, consisting of two junction transistors and a pulse-transformer, is capable of handling the currents required to produce a low-loss connection when operated for two microseconds every one-hundred twenty-five microseconds. The need for such gate arises with the extension of time-division techniques from their well known applications in multiplex transmission to their less obvious but equally worthwhile applications in the switching of transmission paths in a telephone office. The two chief problems that time-division switching raises are in keeping track of associated pairs of lines while waiting for their assigned time slots, since sampling is no longer in unchanging sequence, and in providing low loss bi-directional sampling within a time slot to permit two-wire operation without expensive analogue pulse amplification in the common medium. This paper describes a simple gate that solves the latter problem. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Low-level, high-speed voltage comparator

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 30 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A high speed analogue multiplier with a linearity of better than ± 1/3%

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 32 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  

    THE APPLICATION of transistor circuits to computers has been primarily in the digital field. The purpose of this paper is to indicate that they may also be applied to the simulation of analogue functions. The example, which is illustrated, is a four-quadrant multiplier, where the particular characteristics of semi-conductor devices facilitate the design. The following paper discusses the operations involved in multiplication and the particular circuits that perform these operations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A semiconductor voltage regulator for rotating generators

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 34
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (182 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A transistorized overload-proof electronic regulator (TOPER)

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 35 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (350 KB)  

    With the appearance of transistorized plug-in circuits came the need for power supplies compatible in physical construction and reliability. A series-voltage regulator was reexamined with an open mind to see what a new approach would produce. The TOPER regulator presented here has a typical output characteristic. The heart of the TOPER regulator is a modified emitter-coupled difference amplifier. A short circuit out in the circuitry being powered would produce something like 0.5 ohm (line 2) which will draw about 100 ma; recovery is automatic. A complete loading cycle from no-load to short circuit and back to no-load will show a hysteresis in the output voltage. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reliability

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New and future solid-state devices, their properties and applications

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transistor switching and logic circuits

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Power control

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  

    Presents an abstract of the conference paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Methods of designing and cascading unneutralized tuned-transistor amplifiers

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 38 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    Single-stage amplifiers using available transistors have been designed for high stability and found to have adequate gain and very low tuning interaction. Further consideration of these results shows that some very simple conditions are satisfied at resonance when the single stage is driven and terminated to produce the maximum gain for a given stability. In order that the previous results be of general use, some effective method of cascading must be developed. This problem can be greatly simplified by requiring that all stages have the same stability at resonance, realizing that the stability off resonance may not be the same as the resonant value. Three methods of cascading have been developed on this basis. One method uses dissipative coupling and appears to be the most practical method of cascading. This method is developed by requiring that each stage of the cascaded amplifier be driven and terminated at resonance under the same conditions for which a single stage would obtain the maximum power gain for a given stability. The actual intermediate-stage gain is compared with the maximum single-stage gain. For practical designs, this difference is less than 6 db. The difference per stage is even less than this calculated value when one considers that for n stages, only (n-l) dissipative interstage coupling networks are required. Thus, for a practical two-stage amplifier design, the gain per stage is less than 3 db lower than the maximum single stage transducer gain. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Transistor 70-Mc IF amplifier

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 40 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    A 70-Mc IF amplifier using seven diffused-base germanium transistors is described. The insertion gain is 90 db, with bandwidth greater than 15 mc, flat to within ±0.3 db. The +12-dbm output is stabilized against change in input level or temperature by 35 db of AGC and the noise figure is 5 db. A digital computer was used as a tool in the circuit design. A rough first approximation to the desired design was made on the basis of the measured transistor parameters neglecting feedback and frequency effects. The changes necessary were then determined experimentally, and the computer was used to verify the goodness of the design and to determine the sensitivity of the adjustable parameters. The four-terminal-network parameters of the transistors in the common-emitter connection were measured at frequencies and operating points of interest with the aid of coaxial jigs. These parameters, together with circuit-element values, were put into a computer program based on a cascade of one-stage circuits. Modified parameters can be calculated from these if the transistor is to be used in a connection other than common-emitter. The computer then calculated the desired circuit characteristics. Good agreement has been obtained with experimental results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimum noise performance of transistor input circuits

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 43 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (275 KB)  

    The single common-emiter transistor amplifier fed from a resistive source exhibits a minimum noise figure, when the source resistance has an optimum value. A generalized amplifier is next shown that is fed from a complex source impedance and containing a single common-emitter transistor in the first stage. It is assumed that noise in succeeding stages is negligible. Various feedback paths to either the base or emitter of the first transistor are shown, and an effective shunt input resistor with thermal noise and an effective emitter degeneration resistor with thernlal noise are given. If the signal source is purely resistive, analysis of the circuit shows that a minimum noise figure is obtainable with an optimum source resistance. If the source is a complex impedance, the quantity of interest is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the output of the amplifier. This quantity will in general be dependent on the signal frequency chosen, and on the gain characteristics of the entire amplifier. An expression for SNR in the circuit is given. Again, the result is independent of any feedback, except insofar as the feedback affects the gain characteristic. It is to be emphasized that the criteria for best noise performance are in no way connected with the criteria for maximum power transfer from the source. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The advantages of tetrode geometry for power transistors

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 45 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (299 KB)  

    It can be seen that the leakage currents in a common emitter triode are determined by the input circuitry and quiescent bias levels. In all cases, the lower leakage current limit is approximated by ICBO. With triode common emitter circuitry, it is difficult to attain low values of circuit leakage without severely lowering the normal stage gain. The power tetrode differs from the triode in that it has two isolated base connections, making it possible to insert the signal through one base while using the remaining base to establish the desired no-signal leakage condition. Thus, if both bases of the tetrode are tied together, the unit behaves like a triode. If the base is connected to the emitter, the zero signal leakage current equals ICES irrespective of the impedance level of the other base, and the transfer function of the signal base is made more linear at a somewhat reduced level and exhibits a slight input threshold. If one base is restrained by a voltage equal to the floating potential, the common emitter leakage current is reduced to ICBO, and the transfer function remains essentially the same. Further restraint on the base will cause the input threshold to increase, a feature desirable in certain switching and control applications. Even greater advantage can be achieved with a tetrode using a temperature-sensitive bias source because, with a tetrode, the biasing circuit does not reduce the gain by shunting the input circuit and, because of the isolation, the temperature-sensing unit will not be affected by the input signal level. A practical direct-cuoupled audio amplifier is presented to illustrate the mechanisms that may be used to achieve superior performance, stability, and linearity with a minimum of expensive components. A class-A single-ended circuit is used to illustrate the linearity of the device under large signal conditions. The common-emitter cascade is chosen because of its inherent high gain and its amenability- to direct coupling. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.