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Microwave Symposium Digest, 1989., IEEE MTT-S International

Date 13-15 June 1989

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 283
  • IEEE 1989 MTT-S International Microwave Symposium Digest (Cat. No.89CH2725-0)

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A 3 chip GaAs double conversion TV tuner system with 70 dB image rejection

    Page(s): 95 - 98 vol.1
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    A three-chip VHF-UHF TV tuner system has been implemented with a 0.7- mu m MESFET GaAs technology. The system, based on the double frequency conversion method, consists of an up-converter (IF/sub 1/=1.9 GHz), a smoothing filter, and an image rejection down-converter (IF/sub 2/=35 MHz). The system exhibits 30 dB of conversion gain and 70 dB of image-frequency rejection throughout the VHF-UHF band.<> View full abstract»

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  • A monolithic 60 GHz diode mixer in FET compatible technology

    Page(s): 99 - 102 vol.1
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    A GaAs-technology using a combination of implantation and MOCVD (metal-organic chemical vapor deposition) has been developed that allows the fabrication of Schottky mixer diodes (f/sub T/ approximately=2300 GHz), varactor diodes, and MESFETs (f/sub max/=70 GHz) on the same chip. This allows the production of millimeter-wave mixers with integrated local oscillator and intermediate frequency amplifier. A 60-GHz mixer chip, designed and fabricated using this technology, shows a conversion loss of 6.0 dB and a double sideband noise figure of 3.3 dB.<> View full abstract»

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  • A W-band channelized monolithic receiver

    Page(s): 103 - 107 vol.1
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    Several monolithic integrated circuits with state-of-the-art performances have been successfully developed for a W-band (75- to 110-GHz) channelized monolithic receiver. The receiver comprises one four-channel multiplexer, four balanced mixers, four IF (intermediate frequency) amplifiers, and four Gunn local oscillators. All will be monolithically integrated into only three chips. The authors report on the design, fabrication, and performance of each monolithic component and describe the complete W-band four-channel receiver integration. State-of-the-art performance includes 5-dB insertion loss and 25-dB rejection for the W-band, four-channel monolithic multiplexer, less than 10-dB conversion loss over a 13-GHz bandwidth for the W-band ion-implanted mixers, and 13 dBm output at 63 GHz and 7.7 dBm at 96 GHz for the monolithic Gunn oscillators.<> View full abstract»

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  • Silicon bipolar fixed and variable gain amplifier MMICs for microwave and lightwave applications up to 6 GHz

    Page(s): 109 - 112 vol.1
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    A variety of fixed and variable gain amplifier MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits) for applications up to 6 GHz are presented. The circuits are fabricated using an f/sub T/=10 GHz, f/sub max/=20 GHz, nonpolysilicon-emitter silicon bipolar process. Three amplifier topologies and their performance are reported: a fixed-gain wideband amplifier, a high-gain low-noise amplifier than can also be effectively used as a transimpedance amplifier, and a variable gain amplifier. These MMICs illustrate the capability of silicon bipolar technology to offer cost-effective solutions for microwave applications up to 6 GHz and for digital lightwave applications up to 5 Gb/s.<> View full abstract»

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  • 6 to 18 GHz transmit/receive modules for multifunction phased arrays

    Page(s): 115 - 118 vol.1
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    A full 6-18-GHz transmit/receive (T/R) module is demonstrated for multifunction phased-array applications utilizing a family of high-performance MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits). Featured are output powers reaching over 1.0 W, a 4:1 bandwidth 5-b digital phase shifter, a low-loss, high-isolation switch, and a high-dynamic-range design incorporating all required system functions. It is shown that the performance of the 4:1 bandwidth digital phase shifter and the DC-20 GHz low-loss high-isolation switch surpasses all previously presented results.<> View full abstract»

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  • Quasi-optical planar FET transceiver modules

    Page(s): 119 - 122 vol.1
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    The authors present the design and performance of quasioptical planar transceiver modules suitable for communication and Doppler radar uses. The designs incorporate microstrip antennas which function as resonant loads for FET oscillators. The FETs operate as oscillators and self-oscillating mixers for down-conversion of the received signal. The circuits are simple and inexpensive, and are suitable for incorporation as elements of an active transceiver array. Prototypes were constructed to operate at X-band for demonstration purposes. In addition to their use when scaled to higher frequencies, these circuits have also been demonstrated to perform well as Doppler motion detection modules at 10 GHz.<> View full abstract»

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  • A waveguide switched-susceptance (diode-patch) phase shifter

    Page(s): 123 - 126 vol.1
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    A digital p-i-n diode phase shifter that operates in double-ridge waveguide is described. The phase shifter consists of several split conductive patches etched on a dielectric strip which is inserted in the longitudinal direction in the waveguide. The upper and lower half of each split patch are electrically connected by a diode that is switched between forward and reverse bias to shift the phase in the waveguide. A four-patch 22.5 degrees phase shifter and a five-patch 45.0 degrees phase shifter were designed and fabricated using a computer design program. The measured voltage standing-wave ratio and phase shift performance of the phase shifters are shown. Both phase shifters have less than 0.4-dB insertion loss and less than -40-dB interwaveguide coupling.<> View full abstract»

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  • MMIC phase shifters and amplifiers for millimeter-wavelength active arrays

    Page(s): 127 - 130 vol.1
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    The development of MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) phase shifters and amplifiers at 20 and 44 GHz for application in space-based active antenna arrays is described. Radio frequency probing to characterize the active elements at these frequencies is shown to provide a good basis for the MMIC design. Measured performance results are presented for a 44-GHz phase-shifter switching element, all 16 states of a 4-b 20-GHz MMIC phase shifter, a 180 degrees 44-GHz phase shifter, and a three-stage 20-GHz amplifier.<> View full abstract»

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  • A MMIC based injection locked oscillator for optically fed phased array antennas

    Page(s): 131 - 134 vol.1
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    A novel circuit, containing a high-gain-low-noise microwave injection-locked oscillator, has been developed to improve the interface between the optical and microwave sub-assemblies of optically fed phased array antennas. The circuit utilizes two FETs and a dielectric resonator, which serves as a frequency-dependent feedback element. The circuit provides significant amplitude and phase noise suppression and is designed to operate around 10 GHz. The circuit realization is fully compatible with MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology.<> View full abstract»

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  • Microwave broadband phased array element: design and performance (microstrip horn opened by conduction flaps)

    Page(s): 135 - 138 vol.1
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    The design and performance of a broadband phased-array element with adequate angular coverage is presented. This element was made easily adaptable to microstrip technology as an alternative to notch or Vivaldi antennas. The radiation field calculation, the design parameters study, and the design process are described. A prototype of the phased array element was designed and constructed, and both the E and H radiation patterns and the reflection coefficients were measured. The prototype shows good scanning characteristics as well as appropriate coverage in elevation.<> View full abstract»

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  • W-band ferrite-dielectric image-line field displacement isolators

    Page(s): 141 - 144 vol.1
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    The authors present the results of theoretical and experimental studies of image-line field displacement isolators operating at W-band (90-100 GHz). Isolators were fabricated using GGG (gadolinium gallium garnet), and GaAs as the dielectric and TT2-111 nickel-zinc ferrite and epitaxial yttrium iron garnet as the nonreciprocal medium. Isolators with S/sub 21/-S/sub 12/ ratios of greater than 20 dB have been designed, fabricated, and tested. The authors present the results of the theoretical analysis of a simplified parallel plane waveguide model of a field displacement isolator. The model gave a clear picture of the forward and reverse propagation characteristics and allowed for the optimization of the design of the isolator. Experimental measurements were carried out on a range of structures utilizing a millimeter-wave vector network analyzer operating at 90-100 GHz.<> View full abstract»

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  • New uniaxial-ferrite millimeter-wave junction circulators

    Page(s): 145 - 148 vol.1
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    The authors report on progress in the development of millimeter-wave junction circulators for the band near 31 GHz, incorporating the technique of exploiting the high effective internal magnetic anisotropy field of barium and strontium magnetoplumbites (hexagonal ferrites) to eliminate the external permanent magnet requirement. Microstrip and waveguide three-port junction versions have been built and evaluated, exhibiting good isolation and insertion loss performance, and requiring no magnet. Design considerations include the magnetic material parameters of remanent magnetization, anisotropy, coercive field, resistivity, and shape-dependent demagnetizing effects, as well as microstrip and waveguide junction circuit geometries, dissipative effects, temperature stability, and influences of coax-microstrip transducers.<> View full abstract»

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  • Magnetostatic wave resonators of microstrip type

    Page(s): 149 - 152 vol.1
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    The authors propose a type of magnetostatic wave resonator using a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film with circular metal strips. The characteristics of these have been analyzed by making use of the mode-matching technique. The magnetic potential distribution outside of the microstrip disk was evaluated numerically with high concentration of magnetostatic wave energy, and a mode chart with various resonator dimensions is presented. Experiments were carried out using 20- mu m-thick YIG film with a 6-mm-diameter microstrip disk. Typical resonance characteristics show loaded Q of 340, an average insertion loss of 15 dB, and a dynamic range of 25 dB.<> View full abstract»

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  • A low-loss magnetostatic wave filter using parallel strip transducer

    Page(s): 153 - 156 vol.1
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    A configuration for a magnetostatic forward bulk wave (MSFBW) filter is proposed. The proposed filter uses seven parallel strip transducers and three metal disks loaded on YIG (yttrium iron garnet) film. The radiation impedance of the filter was calculated using a Fourier transform relation between the MSFBW field amplitude and the transducer spatial current distribution. The dependence of YIG film thickness on the 3-dB bandwidth is shown. The transducer design, considering radiation impedance matching using parallel strips, yields a large coupling coefficient with the YIG film. An insertion loss of 6 dB was achieved in the 0.7-5.2-GHz band, and an insertion loss of 4 dB was achieved in the 2.8-3.9-GHz band.<> View full abstract»

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  • A 3.8-30.0 GHz YIG oscillator-theory and design

    Page(s): 157 - 160 vol.1
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    A YIG (yttrium iron garnet) oscillator tunable over the 3.8-30-GHz band has been developed. The author analyzes the oscillator and discusses those of its properties which are critical for wideband and high-frequency performance. An extension of the oscillator band to fundamental limits was achieved by small signal analysis. In addition, optimization of the nonlinear steady state oscillations is considered. The methods of large signal S-parameters, harmonic balance, averaging, and integral manifolds are compared and rigorously justified.<> View full abstract»

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  • X- and Ku-band YIG-film tuned low noise oscillators

    Page(s): 161 - 164 vol.1
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    X and Ku-band YIG (yttrium iron garnet)-film tuned oscillators (YTOs) with phase noise below -95 dBc/Hz 10 kHz from the carrier and a high output power of more than +10 dBm without the use of buffer amplifiers have been developed. The authors describe the design criteria used to realize these high-performance YTOs. The YTOs are characterized by excellent linear tuning, low-phase noise over a relatively wide band, and small frequency drift with temperature. These oscillators are ideal for data and video transmission systems utilizing surface microwave links as well as satellites.<> View full abstract»

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  • Percutaneous transluminal microwave angioplasty catheter

    Page(s): 167 - 170 vol.1
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    The authors describe a microwave balloon angioplasty catheter and its in vitro and in vivo effects on arterial tissue. Microwave energy, producing heat at the end of a balloon angioplasty catheter, can cause softening of an arterial plaque prior to or during inflation of the balloon. This process may result in more effective and longer-lasting dilation of previously stenosed arteries. Furthermore, there is a thermal compression of the three layers of the artery. Such thermal compression has potentially beneficial effects, including a decrease in arterial elastic recoil.<> View full abstract»

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  • A method of solution for a class of inverse problems involving measurement errors and its application to medical microwave radiometry

    Page(s): 171 - 174 vol.1
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    Retrieval of temperature-vs.-depth profiles in a biological tissue structure from multifrequency microwave radiometric measurement data constitutes a typical inverse problem in which the data involve relatively large measurement errors. The authors have developed a method of solution for a class of problems of this type. The method gives solutions in terms of the confidence interval and level. It also has a built-in capability of assessing the degree of fit of solutions to unknown actual source distributions. An agar phantom experiment and computer simulation based on a five-band (1-4-GHz) radiometry were performed to test the method, and the results are presented.<> View full abstract»

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  • Electromagnetic coupling of microstrip lines and coplanar waveguides to multilayer lossy media

    Page(s): 175 - 178 vol.1
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    The spectral-domain method is used to analyze the electromagnetic surface-wave-type coupling of microstrip lines and coplanar waveguides to multilayer lossy dielectric media. Detailed analysis of these coupling characteristics and the role of a thin superstrate layer of lossless material in controlling this coupling are important in fully developing the application of microstrip circuit technology in medical and geophysical applications. Numerical results obtained for the dispersion characteristics were found to be in excellent agreement with published data in special cases of coplanar waveguides and slot lines. Results for the spatial distribution of the various field components in a lossy medium are, however, more involved. Specifically it was noticed that the presence of a superstrate of lossless dielectric medium significantly enhances the axial electric field component, thus facilitating a surface-wave type coupling with exponential decay to the lossy medium.<> View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of microstrip resonator with a dielectric protective layer radiating into human body

    Page(s): 179 - 182 vol.1
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    A two-dimensional simulation of a microstrip resonator with a protective layer in contact with a multilayered lossy media is presented, which makes it possible to obtain the complex resonant frequency, i.e. the resonant frequency and the Q factor of the structure. The analysis is based on the two-dimensional spectral domain approach. This modeling approach constitutes a numerical simulation tool for determining the limits of validity of a simple transmission line model which can be implemented on a desktop computer. A comparison with experiment shows that the proposed method improves a previously presented one-dimensional modeling approach.<> View full abstract»

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  • Computation of EM effects on large biological bodies by an iterative moment method

    Page(s): 183 - 186 vol.1
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    An iterative moment method algorithm using a conjugate gradient method is developed for a three-dimensional arbitrarily shaped dielectric or biological body. The algorithm has a restart feature which allows the operator to pause at a preset stage and then resume the iteration in a continuous way, thus making the computation of large bodies a controlled and measured process with minimum cost and time for a desired accuracy. It was observed that the effect of initial guess has only a small effect, while the direction vectors g/sup (0)/ and correction magnitude A/sup (0)/ are much more important in achieving a faster rate of convergence.<> View full abstract»

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  • Sensing dielectric properties of arbitrarily shaped biological objects with a microwave resonator

    Page(s): 187 - 190 vol.1
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    A rectangular waveguide resonator operating in the H/sub 107/ mode at 6 GHz was used in determining the change in resonant frequency and the Q-factor of the cavity when loaded with single soybean seeds or corn kernels of various shapes and dimensions. By measuring those variables for a kernel oriented in two positions differing by 90 degrees with respect to the maximum electric field vector, the average values of Delta F (shift of resonant frequency) and Delta T (transmission factor) were found to be virtually shape-independent. The ratio Delta F/ Delta T is a size-independent and well-defined function of the material properties ( epsilon '-1)/ epsilon ", and as such it can be related to the material density, moisture content, or other characteristics when all other properties remain unchanged.<> View full abstract»

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  • Monolithic HEMT LNAS for radar, EW, and COMM

    Page(s): 193 - 197 vol.1
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    Several monolithic HEMT (high electron mobility transistors) low-noise amplifiers (LNAs), designed for 7-11-GHz airborne radar, 2-18-GHz electronic warfare, and 20-GHz military satellite communications applications have demonstrated outstanding performance. Two-stage MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits) achieve as low as 1.2 dB noise figure at 10 GHz with 15 dB gain, and typically less than 1.8 dB noise figure from 7-11 GHz. A distributed amplifier demonstrates 3.0-5.2 dB noise figure with around 11 dB gain from 2-18 GHz. Finally, a three-stage MMIC achieves less than 2.0 dB noise figure from 18-23 GHz with 29 dB associated gain, representing the highest level of performance yet reported for a low-noise MMIC.<> View full abstract»

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  • Monolithic V-band pseudomorphic-MODFET low-noise amplifiers

    Page(s): 199 - 204 vol.1
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    V-band, low noise MMICs (monolithic microwave integrated circuits) based on pseudomorphic modulation doped FETs (P-MODFETs) have been developed, and have yielded noise figures that are believed to be the lowest reported for any millimeter-wave MMIC. Single-stage low noise amplifiers with P-MODFETs as active elements (gate dimensions 0.35*60 mu m) exhibited minimum noise figures of 3.9 dB at 58 GHz, with an associated gain of 3.5 dB. Dual-stage MMICs had minimum noise figures of 5.3 dB at 58 GHz, with an associated gain of 8.2 dB, and maximum gain of 10.4 dB at 59.5 GHz. Further, a cascaded four-stage amplifier (two dual-stage MMIC modules) exhibited a 5.8-dB minimum noise figure at 58 GHz, with an associated gain of 18.3 dB, and 21.1 dB of maximum gain. Device processing uniformity and DC and RF reliability data are also presented.<> View full abstract»

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