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IEEE Security & Privacy

Issue 3 • May-June 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • Are all types of internet voting unsafe?

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):3 - 4
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  • [Masthead]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 5
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  • Security, privacy, policy, and dependability roundup

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):6 - 7
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  • Silver Bullet talks with Thomas Rid

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):8 - 10
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  • Politics, love, and death in a world of no privacy

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):11 - 13
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  • Privacy and online social networks: can colorless green ideas sleep furiously?

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):14 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (385 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    One definition of privacy is the selective revelation of information about oneself. With billions of people using social media, it's increasingly difficult for users to control what they're disclosing and to whom. Current privacy protection measures block leakages via privacy settings that are syntactic in nature, but existing solutions don't attempt to cover all the entities who might end up rece... View full abstract»

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  • "All the better to see you with, my dear": Facial recognition and privacy in online social networks

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):21 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Focusing primarily on popular online social networks like Facebook, this article provides an overview of the main social and legal challenges attending the use of facial-recognition technologies on these platforms and explores ways of governing the associated privacy implications, specifically from a European data protection perspective. The authors discuss potential legal, technological, and busi... View full abstract»

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  • Two tales of privacy in online social networks

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):29 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Privacy is one of the friction points that emerge when communications are mediated in online social networks (OSNs). Different communities of computer science researchers have framed the OSN privacy problem as one of surveillance, institutional privacy, or social privacy. In tackling these problems, researchers have also treated them as if they were independent. In this article, the authors argue ... View full abstract»

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  • New strategies for employment? internet skills and online privacy practices during people's job search

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):38 - 45
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (554 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    How does online know-how relate to people's tendencies to manage their privacy? A survey of a diverse group of young adults' online skills and privacy practices reveals patterns of online privacy management, specifically with job search in mind. Findings suggest that women, Whites, and those with higher Internet privacy skills are more likely to manage their online profiles actively. View full abstract»

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  • Twitsper: Tweeting privately

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):46 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (370 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Although today's online social networks provide some privacy controls to protect a user's shared content from other users, these controls aren't sufficiently expressive to provide fine-grained protection. Twitsper offers fine-grained control over who sees a Twitter user's messages, enabling private group communication while preserving Twitter's commercial interests. View full abstract»

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  • Must social networking conflict with privacy?

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):51 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Online social networks have serious privacy drawbacks, some of which stem from the business model. Must this be? Is the current OSN business model the only viable one? Or can we construct alternatives that are technically and economically feasible? View full abstract»

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  • Integrity in embedded control networks

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):61 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (138 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    As threats from malicious attackers increase, integrity approaches in networked embedded systems will have to evolve to provide both the security and safety aspects of integrity in a unified approach. And they'll have to do it on a shoestring, using only a few bits per message. To help achieve this, you can exploit two embedded-systems characteristics: the periodic sampling of messages and the sys... View full abstract»

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  • Security through play

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):64 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (434 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The US Naval Postgraduate School and University of Washington each independently developed informal security-themed tabletop games. [d0x3d!] is a board game in which players collaborate as white-hat hackers, tasked to retrieve a set of valuable digital assets held by an adversarial network. Control-Alt-Hack is a card game in which three to six players act as white-hat hackers at a security consult... View full abstract»

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  • What happened to the crypto dream?, Part 2

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):68 - 71
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1413 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Despite privacy-preserving cryptography technologies' potential, they've largely failed to find commercial adoption. Reasons include people's unawareness of privacy-preserving cryptography, developers' lack of expertise, the field's complexity, economic constraints, and trust issues. View part 1 of this article (from the March/April 2013 issue) here: http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MSP.... View full abstract»

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  • What engineers should know about US security and privacy law

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):72 - 76
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (797 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    As new technology challenges our assumptions about security and privacy, lawmakers respond by attempting to curb and avoid the most egregious risks to the public. In this article, the authors examine how emerging US security and privacy laws create new requirements that constrain software development affecting business owners and developers who want to design security and privacy into IT systems. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of a hardware security module's high-availability setting

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):77 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (664 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Analysis of a hardware security module (HSM) revealed two flaws that could lead to security problems. The first involved key deletion; the second involved unauthorized members of a group of HSMs. Neither flaw is probably fatal, if organizations develop organizational ways to work around it. However, for organizations to apply the solutions, they must be aware of the flaws. View full abstract»

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  • Privateers in cyberspace: Aargh!

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):81 - 84
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    Vigilante enforcement of cyberjustice is an idea whose time has passed. View full abstract»

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  • Ramsey theory: Learning about the needle in the haystack

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):85 - 87
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (118 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Results from number theory show us that even in seemingly random sets, we can find order; total disorder is impossible. Ramsey's theorem can help broaden our perspective in cybersecurity by showing us how to use the emergent order to find patterns and to design systems to avoid certain patterns. View full abstract»

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  • Military cybersomethings

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 88
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Security & Privacy’s primary objective is to stimulate and track advances in security, privacy, and dependability and present these advances in a form that can be useful to a broad cross-section of the professional community—ranging from academic researchers to industry practitioners. It provides articles with both a practical and research bent by the top thinkers in the field of security and privacy, along with case studies, surveys, tutorials, columns, and in-depth interviews and podcasts for the information security industry.
 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ahmad-Reza Sadeghi
Technische Universität Darmstadt
ahmad.sadeghi@trust.tu-darmstadt.de