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Human-Centric Computing Languages and Environments, 2001. Proceedings IEEE Symposia on

Date 5-7 Sept. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 73
  • Proceedings IEEE Symposia on Human-Centric Computing Languages and Environments (Cat. No.01TH8587)

    Publication Year: 2001
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 412 - 413
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An algorithm for stereotype deduction in UML-based formalism and its application in geographic information systems

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 296 - 303
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (502 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Stereotypes provide a mechanism for extending the vocabulary of the UML. Present UML-based formalisms for geographic information system use the concept of visual stereotypes in order to represent geographic types. This paper extends the expressiveness of stereotypes currently defined for geographic types and describes an algorithm for the computation of visual stereotypes resulting from aggregation operations View full abstract»

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  • Investigating the relationship between usability and conceptual gaps for human-centric CASE tools

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 226 - 231
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (477 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Several interviews that we conducted highlight that many of the ease-of-use (usability) problems of CASE tools are instances of "conceptual gaps". A conceptual gap arises because of some difference between the software developer's mental model of the integrated development environment (IDE) and the way it can be used. Filling these gaps is the first step towards human-centric IDE. In this article, we begin by motivating our investigations with a survey highlighting common usability problems in the most popular Java IDEs. We then discuss how the developer's experiences with the complicity of cognitive studies can minimize these conceptual gaps while making the IDE more human-centered. We close our discussion with recommendations for establishing a rigorous scientific investigation for filling these conceptual gaps, as well as for developing and evaluating the ease of use of IDEs. View full abstract»

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  • Bringing robustness to end-user programming

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 142 - 149
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (642 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In some cases, end-user programming allows the design of stand-alone applications. But none of the existing approaches is concerned by safety aspects of programming. Heavy techniques exist to develop safe applications, particularly in non-interactive domains. They involve software engineering techniques, and sometimes, formal methods. All these techniques are very far from end-users. Our idea is to let this part to experts, and to connect end-user programming onto this safe conventional development. Starting from an existing functional core, we built an interactive end-user programming environment called GenBuild, which allows designing interactive stand-alone applications. GenBuild allows the verification of some properties that are a first step towards the development of safe end-user programming View full abstract»

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  • How children understand concurrent comics: experiences from LOFI and HIFI prototypes

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 232 - 233
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (242 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a study of how ten to eleven year old children understand program representations based on comic strips, it turned out that narrative interpretations were more common when using a low fidelity paper prototype than when using a high fidelity computer prototype. One explanation for this is that a computer prototype "sets the rules" to a much greater extent than a paper prototype, thus narrowing the set of plausible interpretations. View full abstract»

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  • End user programming in an industrial Research & Development group

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 234 - 235
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents partial results from a case study of a full application of end user programming in an industrial product Research & Development (R&D) organization. Scientists and engineers developing large industrial machines built all application software, with programmers (including the author) in a support role In interviews, the project team and its managers described a sophisticated and complex integration of programming into their work activities, similar to those described in other end user programming environments View full abstract»

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  • Processing UML models with visual scripts

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 264 - 271
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (556 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We discuss how a CASE-tool supporting the Unified Modeling Language (UML) can be customized and extended using a visual scripting mechanism. We introduce a set of UML model operations that can be used, for example, to transform a UML diagram of one type into another, and to perform set theoretical operations on them. We discuss a visual scripting mechanism that can be used for executing these operations and for combining them to construct new operations with higher-level functionality. The visual scripting mechanism allows the automation of often-repeated software engineering tasks. We present examples of using the proposed techniques in UML based software engineering. We have a prototype implementation integrated to a real world UML modeling tool, the Nokia TED. The aim of this paper is to show how model operations can be exploited to perform interesting model analysis tasks, and how a visual language that uses these operations as primitives may be used for composing useful high-level functions for various software engineering purposes View full abstract»

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  • 3D authoring for content experts: a collaborative approach

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 344 - 345
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (269 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The current production model for 3D scenes, inherited from the early years of computer graphics, prevents a real collaboration among the subjects involved and, as a consequence, the full exploitation of the new potentialities of the 3D media. In this scenario the content expert is only a consultant of the 3d modeler, who is directly responsible for designing the interaction model. In complex 3D applications interactivity, graphic complexity and content play different important roles that should correspond to different well defined skills: authoring is a collaborative activity that involves different experts. The content expert is the key figure of the extended team of authors that collaborate to the design and implementation of a complex interactive application. He/she is an intermediate actor between the final users and the experts devoted to the design of the low level graphic details: is an expert in the application domain and understands the needs of the final users with respect to orientation, navigation and access to the information content; is able to speak the technical language needed to describe the interaction but needs to be provided with high level interaction interface, built by the graphic experts, because is not necessarily skilled in the fine-grained language of interaction with the technology used to build virtual worlds View full abstract»

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  • Computation scrapbooks of Emacs Lisp runtime state

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 236 - 237
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Snapshots of general purpose computation states have found important but limited special purpose uses (e.g. UNIX cores and Smalltalk images). A prototype system is presented for exploring additional uses for computation snapshots in the writing, debugging, testing and documenting of computer programs. These uses center on a Computation Scrapbook, which allows complete copies of program runtime states to be easily saved, organized, and restored. Emphasis is given for using multiple snapshots to benefit intermediate level programmers who have yet to acquire the skills to be comfortable with the intermediate, changing, and mostly invisible nature of computation state. The current system allows snapshots of Emacs Lisp runtime states to be used as context for code documentation, initial and goal states for test cases, and examples for general purpose programming by demonstration. View full abstract»

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  • AutoHAN: an architecture for programming the home

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 150 - 157
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (602 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    AutoHAN is a networking and software architecture that enables user programmable specification of the interaction between appliances in a domestic house. This concept represents an immense challenge for End-User Programming. The characteristics of the potential user population are far broader than any other population of end-user programmers. It is therefore essential to approach the design of the programming environment from a well founded perspective of cognitive ergonomics and user modelling. We have created a novel programming language, Media Cubes, which is aimed at the same user population as existing domestic remote controls. Moreover, we have applied a cognitive model of programming behaviour in order to specify a language that gives the advantages of direct manipulation as well as the power of more conventional languages. View full abstract»

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  • Visual development environment based on component technique

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 346 - 347
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, a visual development environment for components is presented. The advantages of this environment are the strict compliance with the component concept, new kinds of component editors, and the ability to write test cases for components View full abstract»

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  • The ptolemy II framework for visual languages

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 50 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (229 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
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  • A system for rapid prototyping of visual language environments

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 382 - 389
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper describes a visual environment generator, the VLPEG system, based on the Symbol Relation Grammar model. The system exploits a classification of visual languages in terms of graphical symbols and the relationships among them. For each class a lexical analyzer is able to interpret the physical layout of any drawn visual sentence and to provide a corresponding high level representation. Thanks to this capability the visual language designer may disregard the physical features and specify the language at a high abstraction level. VLPEG supports the rapid prototyping of visual environments and offers the designer the possibility to operate in automatic generation mode, by exploiting a grammar inference module. This capability allows the designer to focus on the structural features of the target language and quickly receive feedback from the customer during the language prototyping process View full abstract»

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  • Visualizing impacts of database schema changes - A controlled experiment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 358 - 365
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (602 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Research in schema evolution has been driven by the need for more effective software development and maintenance. Finding impacts of schema changes on the applications and presenting them in an appropriate way are particularly challenging. We have developed a tool that finds impacts of schema changes on applications in object-oriented systems. This tool displays components (packages, classes, interfaces, methods and fields) of a database application system as a graph. Components potentially affected by a change are indicated by changing the shape of the boxes representing those components. Two versions of the tool are available. One version identifies affected parts of applications at the granularity of packages, classes, and interfaces, whereas the other version identifies affected parts at the finer granularity of fields and methods. This paper presents the design and results of a controlled student experiment testing these two granularity levels with respect to productivity and user satisfaction. There are indications that identifying impacts at the finer granularity can reduce the time needed to conduct schema changes and reduce the number of errors. Our results also show that the subjects of the experiment appreciated the idea of visualizing the impacts of schema changes View full abstract»

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  • Aligning syntax and semantics in formalisations of visual languages

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 60 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (253 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Often the most effective diagrams are those which are very simple. However there is a strong tendency, particularly prevalent in visual formal modelling and specification languages, to take a diagrammatic language which at core is very simple, and then add many extensions and features to make it more expressive - often making it so expressive that the diagrams produced in the language are no longer readable; or at least, the diagrams are no longer obviously a more effective form of representation than a text-based one. Both the design of effective visual formal modelling and specification languages, and the effective formalisation of (the semantics of) such visual languages requires the unification of results from visual language theory, cognitive science, empirical psychology and graphic design. Integrating results from such diverse fields is a non-trivial task, which may be approached through a decomposition of the study of issues of effectiveness in diagrammatic languages according to analogous understandings of (written and spoken) natural languages View full abstract»

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  • Programming at the end of the learning curve: Lisp scripting for image processing

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 238 - 239
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (239 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An image processing environment for students of information technology is presented in which programming is an ultimate objective. Our system offers a gentle entry into programming, and we argue that the manner in which programming is introduced is more important for learners than the speck syntax of the language. The environment and its student activities expose successively more sophisticated functionality that culminates in scripting using Lisp View full abstract»

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  • UML-based behavior specification of interactive multimedia applications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 248 - 255
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (575 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Availability of precise, yet usable modeling languages is essential to the construction of multimedia systems based on software engineering principles and methods. Although several languages have been proposed for the specification of isolated multimedia system aspects, there not yet exists an integrated modeling language that adequately supports multimedia software development in practice. We propose an extension of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for the integrated specification of multimedia systems based on an object-oriented development method. Since integration of co-existing timed procedural and interactive behavior is at the heart of multimedia systems, we focus on UML-based specification of behavior in this paper. In addition, we outline how these behavioral aspects are to be integrated with media, presentation, and software architecture modeling to achieve a coherent and consistent model. View full abstract»

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  • FAR: an end-user language to support cottage e-services

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 195 - 202
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (840 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    E-commerce has begun to evolve beyond simple web pages to more sophisticated ways of conducting e-business transactions, such as through electronic advertising, negotiation, and delivery. However, to participate in these advances requires the skills of professional programmers, and end-user owners of small businesses often cannot justify this expense. In this paper, we present FAR, an end-user language to offer and deliver e-services. The novel aspects of FAR are its support of small e-services and its multiparadigm approach to combining ideas from spreadsheets and rule-based programming with drag-and-drop web page layout devices View full abstract»

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  • End user programming in an industrial research and development group

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 411
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (181 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • A visual language for design pattern modelling and instantiation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 338 - 339
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe the Design Pattern Modelling Language, a notation supporting the specification of design pattern solutions and their instantiation into UML (Unified Modeling Language) design models View full abstract»

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  • VXT: Visual XML Transformer

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 404 - 405
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The ever-growing amount of heterogeneous data exchanged via the Internet, combined with the popularity of XML, makes structured document transformations an increasingly important application domain. Most of the existing solutions for expressing XML transformations are textual languages, such as XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) or DOM (Document Object Model), combined with a general-purpose programming language. Several tools build on top of these languages, providing a graphical environment and debugging facilities. Transformations are, however, still specified in a textual way using the underlying language (often XSLT), thus requiring users to learn it. We believe that visual programming techniques are well-suited to representing XML structures and make the specification of transformations simpler. We propose a visual language, called VXT (Visual XML Transformer), for the specification of XML transformations in an interactive environment based on a zoomable user interface toolkit and on two target languages specialised in structure transformations: Circus and XSLT. View full abstract»

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  • A timed automata semantics for real-time UML specifications

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 88 - 95
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We introduce extensions of the UML class, object and statechart diagrams and define the semantics of the UML extensions by means of extended timed graphs (XTG), a timed automata variant. This approach opens the possibility to specify properties of the UML specifications using the timed computation tree logic. The transformation of the UML-specification into XTG allows the verification the system by model checking using the LPMC model checker tool, which uses XTG as its input language. View full abstract»

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  • Selecting one from many: the development of a scalable visualization tool

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 366 - 372
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (505 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes visualisation tools to support the task of selecting one object from a collection of many on the basis of its attribute values. For this frequently encountered task we identify a set of tools appropriate to a spectrum of collection sizes extending from hundreds of thousands to as few as ten or twenty. Although some of the tools have not previously been reported, and some have received only cursory attention in the literature, others are well known. This paper presents the tools in a coherent and consistent manner, showing relationships and progressions between them, identifying their principal attributes and relating them to the problem solver's cognitive task. We conclude with a proposal for integrating techniques within a single tool in order to deal with a continuum of working set sizes View full abstract»

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  • On a uniform logical framework for diagrammatic reasoning

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 64 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (566 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a formalization of diagrammatic systems and transformations in a linear logic framework. We start by showing how to embed Constraint Multiset Grammars, a well-known method for the specification of diagram languages, into a fragment of linear logic in a provably sound and complete way. We then show how this same fragment can express several forms of visual transformations that are commonly used in reasoning with diagrams. By using formal logic as the basis of our framework we gain the significant advantage of an integrated treatment of syntactic and semantic features of diagram languages. Furthermore, since the logic fragment we are using is implemented in linear logic programming languages, the proposed framework is not only formally well-defined, but also allows the verification of the specification via direct execution View full abstract»

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