By Topic

Technology and Society, 2001. Proceedings. International Symposium on

Date 6-7 July 2001

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 34
  • Proceedings International Symposium on Technology and Society

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (228 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • "Star Wars" revisited-a continuing case study in ethics and safety-critical software

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 51 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1024 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Safety-critical software is a core topic in courses on "ethics and computing" or "computers and society," as well as in software engineering courses. The Reagan-era Strategic Defense initiative (SDI) was the focus of a great deal of technical argument relating to design and testing of safety-critical software. Most of today's students have no familiarity with the substance of the SDI arguments. However, with presidents Clinton and Bush considering various versions of a national missile defense system, the topic has again become quite relevant and motivated by current events. This paper describes a curriculum module developed around a Reagan-era SDI debate on the theme-"Star wars: can the computing requirements be met?" This module should be appropriate for use in ethics-related or software-engineering-related courses taught in undergraduate Information Systems, Information Technology, Computer Science, or Computer Engineering programs. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 263
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (41 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Toward a new era for chemical engineering education: making environmental and ethical issues fundamental

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 244 - 251
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Given the relationship between manufactured chemicals and environmental degradation, chemical engineers need to be acutely aware of the implications of their designs and their responsibilities. The best way to promote such awareness and responsibility is to make these issues an explicit part of undergraduate chemical engineering education. Such an expansion of the curriculum is supported by the new ABET Criteria 2000. This paper explores ABET and other reasons for incorporating environmental and ethical issues into chemical engineering education, and provides general recommendations for how his goal may be accomplished. Five factors that require chemical engineering graduates to be well-versed in environmental issues are outlined, and an analysis of ethics and responsibility for chemical engineers is performed. A pervasive approach to curricular change, in which environmental and ethical topics are integrated into many courses at all levels of education, is proposed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The role of discourses in multidisciplinarity

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 7 - 12
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper deals with the role of discourses and dialogues in multidisciplinary processes and their relation to engineering education. Discourses are an effective method in shaping multidisciplinary dialogues. Awareness of multidisciplinary reflection is growing due to two effects: Increasing specialization of the engineering disciplines and increasing impact of technology on daily life. Many engineering and technological problems are no longer solvable within a single discipline. Moreover, boundary conditions from the societal and ethical context become more and more important. Transdisciplinar reflection is needed to achieve the appropriate solution, satisfying both, the technological and social constraints. Multidisciplinary practice requires knowledge about the different ways of intradisciplinar hermeneutics and knowledge management. Technological hermeneutics is one of the keys in understanding value-management, reasoning and reflection in engineering sciences and practice. Further, basic knowledge about ethical reasoning and reflection techniques of human sciences will be helpful in understanding of contextual problems and their normative treatments. Two levels of multidisciplinarity are examined: Interdisciplinarity between experts coming from different scientific disciplines working on the same issue, and secondly, communication between experts and non-experts belonging to stakeholder groups, e.g. in technology assessment View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Humanities and social sciences in engineering education-postwar to postmodern and beyond

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 73 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (800 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The impact of EC2000 on the humanities/social sciences (HSS) component of engineering curricula concerns both engineering and HSS faulty members. This paper reviews how the events of the last fifty years have affected the role of the HSS in engineering education. After World War II a strong effort was made to strengthen the scientific basis of the undergraduate engineering curriculum to better prepare students for graduate study and research. At the same time there was an effort to return the HSS, which had been neglected during WW II, to a more important role in this curriculum. By the late 1960s this had led to overcrowded curricula. Dissatisfaction with the HSS led to calls for reform, but in the press of other events, these went largely unheeded. In the post-Cold War era, industry's need to compete in global markets has put other demands on the engineering curriculum that may further diminish the role of the HSS. Some tentative conclusions are drawn from these events about the future prospects of the HSS Under EC2000 View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ethical and legal issues related to emerging technologies: reconsidering faculty roles and technical curricula in a new environment

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 203 - 209
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (540 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As emerging technologies are integrated into university courses and curricula, it is important for faculty to monitor and reflect upon the ethical and legal challenges that accompany these technologies and the new environments they help create. Contemporary epistemology has altered our conception of language, bringing about recognition of a moral imperative-that communication in technical and professional settings constitutes more than an instrumental act, that it carries with it an obligation to recognize and respond to ethical controversy. This paper examines how we shall become more morally engaged in communication instruction. Analysis reveals three barriers inherent to our academic identities that impinge upon our potential to become morally engaged as faculty. Furthermore, we can develop technical curricula to prepare out graduates to create and fill a wider spectrum of professional roles. While not unrealistically downplaying the importance of traditional technical skills, such a curricula should create technically competent communicators to act as “agents of improvement” who decrease the “insulation of expertise” from the public “lifeworld” View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Teaching business/IT ethics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 13 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (396 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the research and conclusions regarding adding an ethics course to a business/technology oriented masters program. The status of various codes of ethics and the incorporation of such codes into the business and academic world is discussed. Established collage ethics courses and the government propensity to regulate social change are discussed. The decision not to add the course is partially based on the fact that there are ethical themes already present in five courses that can be expanded. It is also based on a faculty, who possess years of business and technological experience. Encouraging and giving them direction on how to add their ethical experience will improve our program View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The engineer shall hold paramount the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Unless, of course…

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 162 - 167
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Engineering codes of ethics commonly state in the first canon that the engineer shall hold paramount the health, safety, and welfare of the public. Although this is an unequivocal statement, engineers at times choose not to do so. In this paper I discuss five circumstances in which the engineer might choose not to hold the health, safety, and welfare of the public paramount: (1) if the engineers believes that the requirement is internally inconsistent, (2) if the engineer's religious convictions prevent adherence to the requirement, (3) if the engineer believes that the public does not know what is best for it, (4) if the engineer is forced to do otherwise, and (5) if the engineer believes that damage to the environment outweighs short term public interest. I discuss the moral implications of each reason, and finally suggest a modification of the first canon that, although unlikely to be adopted, frames my view of the responsibilities of engineers View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Shaping the future of American university education: conceiving engineering a liberal art

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 213 - 220
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Students can no longer be expected to learn how to solve problems in a precisely defined area of engineering but need to be prepared to situate these problems into multiple settings. Conceiving engineering as a liberal art indicates that engineering knowledge is required not only for a specialized career path but also increasingly important for active participation in citizenship. This idea challenges universities to rethink fundamental notions of both the liberal arts and engineering. Experimentation with new curricula in these educational areas should be a priority of universities, especially engineering institutions. We explore evidence from Georgia Tech and other universities that differences between engineering and the liberal arts are drawn too sharply, that design with a large number of variables and incommensurable objectives requires new critical vocabularies for production, and that the idea of engineering as a liberal art offers an opportunity to develop needed curricular flexibility View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An existentialist ethic of technological application and assessment in medicine

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 87 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (404 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Medical technology should preserve meaning before prolonging life. It is a matter of justice that technological interventions into circumstances of unavoidable suffering should preserve and facilitate a better understanding of meaning in suffering or alleviate suffering even through hastened death. A longer life is not necessarily a better life. Because of the advancements in medical technology, countless individuals may now be considered chronically ill. Yet, situations of unavoidable suffering may allow for other options such as euthanasia or physician assisted suicide. Technological interventions should be re-evaluated to value an individual assessment of being, not the elongation of life. Such does not prohibit technological interventions, but promotes individual autonomy. Therefore, it is a matter of justice for medical technology to preserve meaning before prolonging life View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ethical and social issues criteria in academic accreditation. Infusion of ethics and social issues throughout engineering, scientific and technical curricula

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 82 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    At present, Technical Curriculum deals with the study of Science and its application. The acquisition and application of scientific knowledge and techniques to various fields such as industry, agriculture, medicine, health care, transport, housing, defense etc., should result in a technology that would meet the needs and comforts to all the people of the country. Science and technology must have two factors, viz. coherence and utility. They must satisfy man's thirst for knowledge and it must also provide value addition to the life in terms of comforts. The former promotes human culture and the later, human civilisation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Early Bell system/independents relationships

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 187 - 191
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Through years of teaching the history of the information and communication industry I have been confounded by what appears to be a specific reversal of attitude of AT and T in dealings with Independent Telephone Companies (Independents). I am referring to corporate policy between the years 1907 and 1913. Before Theodore Vail returned to AT and T in 1907, the corporation was regarded as a most predatory monopoly. Policy seemed to be buy or force the independents out of business and don't let them connect to AT and T interstate circuits. That policy was closely followed until the 1913 Kingsbury Commitment reversed it completely. Something happened to the company, or Vail, during this time period to cause a profound change in business focus. Did Vail have a non-predatory philosophy all along but lack authority to enforce it. Did religion impact his mindset or did some other profound experience help change his mind? Was it the pressure of the “trust busters” in Washington that forced the change? Or were the changes just a result of good business sense? I think J.P. Morgan really was the robber baron, and Vail was the white knight that set AT and T on the right path for the next 70 years View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ethical issues with target marketing on the Internet

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 105 - 113
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (692 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The popularity of the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) heightens the issue of target marketing and the vulnerability of some segments. There is an ethical concern that the ability to accurately target market certain segments that are deemed vulnerable allows these groups to be exploited by marketers. This paper explores ethical issues related to target marketing to vulnerable groups on the Internet and WWW. Additionally, the role education has in developing marketing ethics is explored. The author concludes that marketers on the Internet and WWW should follow the same ethical marketing practices as are followed in more traditional marketing venues View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What is the key to globalisation? [social aspects of automation]

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 117 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (684 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a five-year period, between 1993 and 1998, the number of Internet sites grew 200-fold. Accordingly, there are now an estimated 304 million global Internet users, an increase of 78 percent from 1999. Another appreciable trend is who is using the Internet and from where. Recently released research found that the United States and Canada now account for less than 50 percent of total user growth. This is a trend that most researchers believe will continue during the next decade. This belief is also strongly supported by research conducted by the World Economic Forum. The WEF Task Force on the Global Digital Divide Initiative issued a report to the Kyushu-Okinawa G-8 Summit in June disclosing research and suggestions for action. The WEF report noted that “Market-oriented policy reforms, local entrepreneurial efforts international community significantly increase the deployment and usability of telecommunications, Internet and related technologies in many countries across Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East”. It is apparent that design plays a significant role in effective communication. The Italian designer Lidia Guibert Ferrara noted that, “The goal of cross-cultural design is to respect the subtleties of one's audience, an effort that requires constant questioning of both the designer's personal beliefs and the troubling misconceptions that might be lurking in the assignment”. The major concerns addressed here may seem common place. In practice, however, designers and usability experts continue to overlook basic communication considerations as noted by example throughout this paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Professional issues in software engineering curricula: case studies on ethical decision making

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 252 - 261
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (848 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of the Internet and the World Wide Web presents both Information Systems professionals and business managers with many new ethical problems. It is therefore, necessary to teach students about professional issues. This paper looks at how Professional Issues entered the Higher Education curriculum during the last decade. In particular we present the experience gained within the School of Informatics and Multimedia Technology at the University of North London through the integration of case studies for the Professional Issues part of the In-Course-Assessment (ICA) of a Software Engineering module. The case studies fulfil one of the two core capabilities covered in the module. The marking scheme and two different resolutions to the ethical dilemma posed in one of the scenarios (case studies) reached by particular students are presented together with our conclusion and indications of further action and research View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enhancing computer ethics by increasing collaboration and peer learning

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 61 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It has been said that students learn more when they are actively engaged in coursework. With this is mind our course in Computer Ethics has been significantly changed to increase collaboration and enhance peer learning. A large portion of this change was made possible by using the Web-Based Course Management System, Blackboard Course Info and designating the course “speaking intensive”. Educators everywhere are learning to use the Internet as a powerful tool in the assistance of teaching and learning. The Internet extends the effectiveness of the classroom experience and turns it into an exciting and interactive education environment. One of the fastest growing areas in the technology-mediated educational arena is the use of the Internet by colleges and universities to supplement face-to-face courses with online components. This paper discusses how a Computer Ethics Course used Course Info to strengthen cooperation and education and evaluates the result of the course participants View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Curriculum issues and controversies in computer ethics instruction

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 41 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper examines two controversial issues currently associated with computer ethics instruction. First, the question whether computer ethics courses should be taught by philosophy faculty or by computer science faculty is considered, and arguments advanced by proponents on each side of the debate are critically analyzed. We then consider controversies surrounding the implementation of certain “knowledge units” on social and ethical issues in the Computer Science Curriculum, as recently proposed by the IEEE-CS/ACM Task force on Computing curricula. Finally, an interdisciplinary model is suggested that would enable instructors to deliver computer ethics courses in a way that integrates certain methodological insights from the disciplines of philosophy and computer science, as well as from the relevant social sciences View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On subjectivity in focal engineering

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 177 - 184
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The concept of focal engineering is discussed as a means of taking institutional care for the impact of engineering technologies on the lifeworld. The individual focal engineer is presented as moving into the intersubjective conversation of the lifeworld from out of her/his authentic subjectivity. The engineering enterprise is considered as a contextual phenomenon, including three contextual layers: lifeworld containing the realm of systems, systems containing the realm of technological systems, and technological systems containing the realm of engineering. With increasing technical development, the lifeworld is more and more colonized by systems, especially the technological subsystem. These systems have a broad influence on the lifeworld, as criteria of these subsystems, e.g. efficiency and productivity, seem to dominate everyday life. The colonization process is largely done without rational oversight and seems to indicate a technological determinism. Problems arise from this process. As technological values tend to dictate more and more the shape of the lifeworld, human freedom will be more and more limited. The danger of a dehumanized lifeworld appears. Engineers are largely involved in the process, as technological design is a basic goal of the discipline. The main question is, how should technological design be done in order to be appropriate to the boundary condition of maintaining freedoms in an authentically humanized lifeworld? This is the place of focal engineering View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Social informatics and service-learning as models for teaching ethical and social issues in science and engineering

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 235 - 243
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a framework for the treatment of ethical and social issues in science and engineering curricula. This framework is based on the basic foundations of applied engineering ethics, adaptation of the structure of the meta-discipline of social informations, and a developmental variant of the service-learning pedagogy based on Perry's cognitive-structural model for intellectual development. The paper shows how the framework can be implemented across a curriculum and in an issue-specific manner View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying ABET Engineering Criteria 2000 to a German Electrical Engineering program

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 226 - 231
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Electrical Engineering program of the University of Karlsruhe (Germany) entered the ABET evaluation procedure for advanced-level programs in 1999. The Pre-Visit was held in May 1999, the ABET Main Visit took place in December 2000. The Karlsruhe EE program is the first engineering program outside the US which is evaluated according to the new criteria EC2000. The results are supposed to demonstrate the substantial equivalency with accredited US engineering programs. In Germany, accreditation of engineering programs is only ascending, because ever since University programs and their curricular principles have been harmonized by federal-state laws and regulations. Quality management was simply implied, because of the strong normative regulations. Recently, accreditation and Total Quality Management have become the buzzwords in Germany because of the need for objective criteria in the comparison of German programs with international engineering education. Emphasis will be on social and ethical issues in engineering programs and their implementation in engineering education. Moreover, the adequacy of these criteria with respect to the issues is debated and the need for teaching of knowledge management as a meta-science within engineering is addressed. Technological hermeneutics, i.e. the philosophical fundamentals of technology design is regarded as an essential in engineering education. Finally, the need for a new professional image of the engineer within modern industries in the global environment is discussed. Since ABET EC2000 is designed for American education programs, its applicability to German engineering programs and its impact on curriculum is discussed in detail View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ethics education for engineers: an industry perspective

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 149 - 152
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Lockheed Martin Corporation has ethics as its number one value. It involves every element of our business, our relationships and goes beyond just the letter of the law. It is about doing what is right. It is certainly about compliance and meeting out commitments. It is also about providing an environment where employees can be the most productive, innovative, supported, able to fully focus on customer satisfaction. This commitment by Lockheed Martin is handed down from the leadership throughout the company, through the allocation of resources and the engagement of the work force. Detailed below is out philosophy, the details of our Ethics Program and the demonstrated commitment of our business to ethics as our number one value View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A conceptual framework for teaching Internet ethics

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 67 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The author argues that teaching Internet and computer ethics requires an approach that focuses primarily on the different social, economic, and cultural roles of the internet, and on the effects of new information technology on our understanding of important concepts like privacy, property, and justice. Particular issues, the author believes, can best be addressed in the context of this discussion View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • All this and engineering too: history of accreditation requirements for nontechnical curriculum content in U.S. Engineering Education 1933-2000

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 155 - 161
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A concern for the non-technical side of engineering education has been a part of the accreditation process in the U. S. since the founding of the Engineering Council for Professional Development (ECPD) in 1932. The first accreditation policy published in 1933 left the specific criteria for curriculum content up to the discretion of the members of the accrediting panel. In 1955, a minimum of one-half year of “humanistic-social studies” was required for the first time. This requirement remained substantially unchanged until it was dropped as part of the changes associated with the adoption of EC 2000. The current criteria call for engineering students to have “an understanding of … ethical, social, economic, and safety considerations,” but whether curricula will emphasize these areas more in the future remains to be seen View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Russian technology and highly educated personnel on the modern American market

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 95 - 104
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (812 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The economic and social aspects of the Russian technology and manpower transfer to the American market are under research. While analysing the direct and indirect forms of the work of the Russian highly educated personnel for American companies, main case studies are made in software industry. The stimulus for the Russian personnel's direct outflow to the American labor market (produced both by Russian and American sides), as well as its economic and social consequences are under special consideration. There is also a detailed analysis of offshore programming. Technology and manpower transfer via partnership in the Russian-American joint ventures is also analysed in the research. Space launching is picked out as the most interesting example here View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.