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System Sciences, 2001. Proceedings of the 34th Annual Hawaii International Conference on

Date 3-6 Jan. 2001

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 528
  • Sales taxes on the Internet: when and how to tax?

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (468 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As a first attempt to tax electronic commerce, many countries applied the existing tax laws to Internet. However, applying these laws to border-spanning electronic commerce proved very inefficient and inappropriate. While some authorities claim not taxing the Internet is the best solution for encouraging the growth of electronic commerce, we believe that use and sales taxes in general are an important part of a government's revenues and that their ban over the Internet is not feasible. Given the magnitude of potential revenues to be obtained from sales over the Internet, we need to consider when and how governments should tax electronic commerce. We focus on some proposals which try to answer this question and argue that a taxation scheme based on the location of the consumer is the best starting point for a global solution. View full abstract»

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  • Surfacing tacit knowledge in requirements negotiation: experiences using EasyWinWin

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Defects in the requirements definition process often lead to costly project failures. One eminent problem is that it can be difficult to take deliberate advantage of important tacit knowledge of success-critical stakeholders. People know more that they can ever tell. Implicit stakeholder goals, hidden assumptions, unshared expectations often result in severe problems in the later stages of software development. We present a set of collaborative techniques that support a team of success-critical stakeholders in surfacing tacit knowledge during systems development projects. We discuss these techniques in the context of the EasyWinWin requirements negotiation methodology and illustrate our approach with examples from real-world negotiations. View full abstract»

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  • An exploration of the application service provision outsourcing option

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The third wave of IT outsourcing has reached small, medium-sized, but also large organisations, with a storm of interest via the Internet, in the form of application service provision. Application service providers (ASPs) offer multiple users a subscription based access model via the Internet or a virtual private network to centrally managed applications. The appeal of ASPs are the per-user-pricing models, accessibility to applications and capabilities, and value-added management services. The paper argues that although ASPs offer an electronic solution, it does not differ much in practice from classical outsourcing practice. Using a conceptual contingency model that combines resource dependency theory, resource based theory, transaction cost theory, and agency theory, the paper explores the ASP option in a number of case studies. View full abstract»

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  • Operational knowledge representation for practical decision making

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In various industrial fields, the operators use predesigned procedures either to solve problems or for troubleshooting. In the Parisian subway, such procedures have existed since 1900. However, these procedures are not always exactly suited to the case at hand, and the operators generally prefer to customize a solution than to rely on fixed procedures. For the design of an intelligent assistant system aimed at supporting operators' decisions in subway control, we have modeled operators' activity and know-how. As a result, we introduce the contextual graph model, which appears as a simple solution to describe and manage operational decision making. View full abstract»

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  • M-commerce - mobile commerce: a new frontier for E-business

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 3509
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (32 KB)  

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  • A methodology to structure ill-structured processes: performance centered design

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and illustrate a performance-centered design (PCD) methodology for finding the underlying structure of ill-defined processes and problems. The context for our theoretical exposition is the fuzzy front-end of new product development (NPD). Within the NPD process, front-end concept definition and selection is central to a firm's innovation capability because it drives the entire NPD process. Yet, despite this fact, these activities are ill-structured and typically the most poorly managed activities in the entire innovation process. We propose that the front-end of NPD can be more effectively enabled through the simultaneous structuring and development of processes and implementation techniques. Through a case study, we illustrate the proposed PCD methodology and illustrate how electronic performance support technology can be utilized to support the fuzzy front-end process. View full abstract»

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  • Configuring component-based specifications for domain-specific languages

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The "Jacob" system supports language design processes on a very high level of abstraction, enabling experts from application domains to design their own domain-specific languages (DSLs). The system provides a representation of the language design space for a certain application domain. The user specifies his language design by composing and configuring language components. During this design process, the Jacob system checks the consistency of user decisions. The language components are provided by an expert in the field of computer languages and their implementation. Such a component consist of two parts: the implementation part defines how a given language feature is implemented. The interface part specifies relations and dependences between different components, e.g. to constrain the way different language features can be combined. This paper presents component-based DSL design using the Jacob system and discusses some example applications. View full abstract»

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  • A live TV-quality distant learning multimedia presentation system for education

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper an abstract semantic model called multimedia augmented transition network (MATN) to model a live TV-like multimedia presentation system for distance learning education purpose is presented. Unlike the original design for CISCO IP/TV system that is built upon Microsoft ActiveMovie technology, a Java-based viewer called JTViewer is developed to provide the cross-platform capability for CISCO IP/TV system. In the JTViewer system, different media streams need to be synchronized and displayed in real-time. In order to meet this requirement. The MATN model is the underlying semantic model for the presentation in the proposed framework since it provides the visualization of control structure and a good programming data structure for the implementation. An example of distance learning via multimedia presentations is given to illustrate how the MATN model serves as the underlying semantic model for the JTViewer system. View full abstract»

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  • Multiple type workflow model for enterprise application integration

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The business environment is changing rapidly everyday. Enterprise information systems must be able to adapt to changes in markets quickly and flexibly. Enterprises control large amounts of software resources and these software resources must be integrated. One solution that is attracting a great deal of attention is the concept of enterprise application integration (EAI). EAI can adapt to changes in markets quickly and flexibly. As a method for implementing EAI, we are proposing business process-based integration using workflow techniques. Business process-based integration divides an enterprise information system into business processes and the work logic that comprises the system. We propose a new type of workflow for EAI. The new workflow for EAI uses a CORBA interface to integrate different types of systems and uses a state transition model based on a database to dynamically control processes. An organization can define business processes and rules so that the business processes can flexibly adapt to changes in the organization and applications. We have confirmed the effectiveness of this new workflow management system for EAI by applying it in an actual test case. View full abstract»

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  • The healthcare information technology context: a framework for viewing legal aspects of telemedicine and teleradiology

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Explores the healthcare information technology context as a backdrop for viewing the legal issues that accompany telemedicine and teleradiology. In this age of managed care, healthcare informatics has become a burgeoning field. Computer-based technologies help automate processes such as patient data collection. As patient records become increasingly digitized, they are more easily transmitted between various healthcare sites and personnel. The security of electronic medical data transfer, however, is sometimes inadequate. Digitized medical records give rise to a number of legal issues. A well-known example is the security of electronic medical data. Data security and other legal issues pose enormous challenges to the adoption of healthcare technologies; these barriers can potentially inhibit their diffusion. In the case of telemedicine, many of the current laws are underdeveloped and unstable, and pending bills are often obscure. In addition to confidentiality, other legal issues I discuss include malpractice, reimbursement and licensure. View full abstract»

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  • Nontraditional computer support for design and user evaluation

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 1845
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  • Infoparco: an experience in designing an information system accessible through WEB and WAP interfaces

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 3510 - 3515
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

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  • Second-degree price discrimination for information goods under nonlinear utility functions

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper studies second degree price discrimination for information goods. Prior research in the context of traditional goods (where marginal costs are convex as a function of product quality) shows that a firm can increase profits by offering vertically differentiated products to heterogeneous consumers. Some researchers have obtained the converse result for information products, assuming negligible marginal costs which vary little with product quality. Earlier models have used specific forms of the consumer utility function (most commonly a utility function that is linear in type and product quality). We model this problem using a generalized utility function where the utility is monotonically increasing with product quality and consumer type. We find that for information goods, price discrimination is profitable only in markets where high-value consumers benefit relatively more than low-value consumers from increases in quality. View full abstract»

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  • Cultural relevance: hip-hop music as a bridge to the digital divide

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    America faces a real challenge to its position as a global leader in information technology, which impacts the preparedness of the national workforce. The 21st century worker is facing a dynamic environment, where knowledge, speed, and technical proficiency will determine the "haves" and the "have nots". This lack of technology proficiency has produced a "digital divide" for many underrepresented groups. This paper proposes to use a medium that is culturally relevant to inner-city youth-hip-hop music-to increase information technology awareness and acceptance, fostering use of resources that offer wealth-creation in an Internet-based economy. View full abstract»

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  • An empirical analysis of web page revisitation

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There is a surprising lack of empirical research into user interaction with the web. This paper reports the results of an analysis of four months of logged data describing web use. The results update and extend earlier studies carried out in 1994 and 1995. We found that web page revisitation is a much more prevalent activity than previously reported (approximately 80% of pages have been previously visited by the user), that most pages are visited for a surprisingly short period of time, and that users maintain large (and possibly overwhelming) bookmark collections. View full abstract»

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  • Brewsing the web: delay, determination and satisfaction

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 1802 - 1806
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  • Trading of intangible goods

    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 4033
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  • Continuous audit implications of Internet technology: triggering agents over the Web in the domain of debt covenant compliance

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants have together called on the research community to show how continuous audit (CA) could be implemented in various auditing domains. In response to this call, we look at the domain of debt covenant compliance, and we utilize Cold Fusion, a leading Web applications development technology, to design and demonstrate an implementation of a continuous process audit within this domain. We design and demonstrate a system that uses agents sent over the Internet to continuously monitor whether actual values of client's variables are in compliance with standards for these variables set out in the debt covenant agreement-all from a remote location, the loan officer's desk. View full abstract»

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  • Virtual scientific collaboration and Nonaka's Ba

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Each year, at enormous expense, scientists travel to meetings to exchange knowledge. Because great value is attributed to these gatherings, more should be learned about scientific meetings in virtual places which is considerably less expensive. Scientific conferencing in virtual meeting places has been ongoing since the early 90's. Observations of people experiencing these virtual places prompted objective studies revealing that nearly 70% of them report a sense of "being there" or virtual presence. This manuscript presents further evidence corroborating these earlier studies and discusses the relationship of virtual presence to Nonaka's model of knowledge creation. Nonaka's model proposes a concept called Ba which denotes a place that promotes knowledge conversion. Ba is not limited to physical space, it includes virtual and mental spaces as well. This paper introduces the similarities between Ba and virtual presence, and discusses their relevance to improving the effectiveness of virtual scientific collaboration. View full abstract»

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  • Rural post-acute stroke care using multidisciplinary telerehabilitation

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA and is the leading cause of long-term adult disability. Comprehensive coordinated rehabilitation services can reduce mortality and improve functional outcomes following stroke. In rural communities, however, the specialized services and supports needed by patients after stroke are often not available. An innovative alternative to deliver rehabilitation services is telerehabilitation. The INTEGRIS Rural Facilities and the INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Network collaboratively conducted case studies utilizing physical therapy, occupational therapy, neuropsychology and vocational rehabilitation for stroke survivors in rural communities 70 to 170 miles away from the specialists. Consultations were conducted using H320 videoconferencing equipment over dedicated T-1 lines. The telerehabilitation applications, patient outcomes, service coordination, cost-effectiveness and lessons learned are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Feedback mechanisms as intermediaries for Web information market: an exploratory study

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Internet is sometimes said to be drowning in contents. Users of information therefore experience great difficulty in identifying the accuracy, relevancy and interpretability of information. Total data quality management and centralized information intermediaries are either too expensive for the vast amount of Internet contents or they force information consumers to face the problem of determining the trustworthiness of the intermediaries. We explore the possibility of using various feedback mechanisms to serve as intermediaries. The service quality of four types of feedback is compared in this study: click-through count, open-ended feedback, close-ended feedback and no feedback. The potential benefits of feedback are twofold. For information consumers, it serves to provide quality proofs and helps the user to become aware of the public's preferences toward specific content sites. For information producers, feedback could provide peer support and recognition. This exploratory study concludes that open-ended feedback and click-through counts result in users with a higher perceived service quality. For the information providers, feedback information awards them with peer support and a more satisfied attitude toward the system. These results, while not conclusive, suggest that it is possible to make feedback mechanisms play the role of infomediaries in order to manage the information market - a much more important role than for accounting purposes. View full abstract»

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  • Should we wait? Network externalities and electronic billing adoption

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The study examines the adoption of electronic bill presentment and payment (EBPP) technology solutions. EBPP continues to grow and has a huge potential for becoming a multi-billion dollar e-commerce industry. The adoption configuration is quite interesting because it involves four stakeholders: billers, bill consolidators, banks and consumers. In this case, banks and bill consolidators compete against each other to act as an intermediary between billers and consumers. Network externalities play a significant role since the more billers that adopt the technology, the more consumers are willing to use the services. The analysis is based on the welfare economics concept of finding the socially optimum adoption configuration and the resulting adoption pattern in a market with sponsored technologies. The results show that because of expected network externalities, billers are more likely to adopt the existing technology early, despite the fact that the next technology might be superior to the current one. When the higher costs of early adoption are taken into account, the model shows that billers are more willing to wait, ceteris paribus. View full abstract»

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  • Can GSS groups make better decisions and feel good at the same time? A longitudinal study of asynchronous GSS groups

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A comprehensive review of GSS research literature indicates that in over 200 different GSS research experiments done in the last decade, GSS generally increases group decision quality or effectiveness. However, 90% of the experiments report that GSS does not increase and frequently even decreases group satisfaction. This can lead to the rejection of adoption and/or use of GSS in organizations, and has understandably become a main concern in GSS research literature. The current research explores this important issue. With a theoretical framework specifically aiming to support group development and team building, it is hypothesized that GSS embedded within such framework may help groups make better decisions and at the same time, feel good. A longitudinal study was conducted using a second generation GSS. The suggested results reported that GSS embedded within this framework generally enhance decision quality and increase group satisfaction at the same time. View full abstract»

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  • An agent-based network consultation system using cooperation between a sales organization and multi-agents

    Publication Year: 2001
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We have developed a consultation system that assists in the communication between salespeople and their customers. It uses interaction and an information sharing function. The system provides a special information service for sales organizations that use of multiagents. We propose a concept for coordinating the consultation system. In this system, a sales expert and multiagents provide service as one body. Moreover, we have developed an effective communication method in which a salesperson and a manager cooperate with their agents to perform N Customer: M expert communication with their customers. View full abstract»

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  • Genre based navigation on the Web

    Publication Year: 2001
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (204 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report on our ongoing study of using the genre of Web pages to facilitate information exploration. By genre, we mean socially recognized regularities of form and purpose in documents (e.g., a letter, a memo, a research paper). Our study had three phases. First, through a user study, we identified genres which most/least frequently meet searchers' information needs. We found that certain genres are better suited for certain types of needs. We identified five major groups of document genres that might be used in an interactive search tool that would allow genre based navigation. We tried to balance the following dual objectives: i) each group should be recognizable by a computer algorithm as easily as possible; ii) each group has a better chance of satisfying particular types of information needs. Finally, we developed a novel user interface for Web searching that allows genre based navigation through three major functionalities: 1) limiting search to specified genres, 2) visualizing the hierarchy of genres discovered in the search results and 3) accepting user feedback on the relevancy of the specified genres. View full abstract»

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