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Requirements Engineering, 2000. Proceedings. 4th International Conference on

Date 19-23 June 2000

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 35
  • Proceedings Fourth International Conference on Requirements Engineering. ICRE 2000. (Cat. No.98TB100219)

    Publication Year: 2000
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  • Requirements-related risks in critical systems

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 3
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (65 KB)

    Summary form only given, as follows. This talk considers some of the roles that requirements engineering plays in computer system development, with particular emphasis on systems with critical requirements such as security, reliability, safety, and survivability. The RISKS archives are littered with cases attributable to requirements problems that propagate throughout development, from which many ... View full abstract»

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  • Z specifications meet Mathematica for exploratory prototyping

    Publication Year: 2000
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    In order for formal methods to achieve widespread acceptance, associated tools must become more accessible to the average user. This work describes ZEM (Z Embedded in Mathematica), a new tool supporting the major phases of the requirements analysis life cycle. ZEM is best described as an animator for Z specifications with a theorem proving component. The overall goal in its design has been twofold... View full abstract»

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  • Why is it so difficult to introduce requirements engineering research results into mainstream requirements engineering practice?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):67 - 68
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  • Why is it so easy to introduce requirements engineering technology transfer panels into mainstream practice?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):69 - 70
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB)

    This position paper has summarized conclusions reached by prior panels and has suggested moving on. One suggested focus is attention to the network of research dependencies that must be in place for us to succeed. A second focus is the need for a close working relationship between business and systems concerns. View full abstract»

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  • Transferring research results in requirements to practice: obstacles and incentives

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):71 - 72
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (48 KB)

    Described here are three obstacles to more widespread use of formal techniques in software development and three significant benefits that result from using formal techniques to describe and analyze requirements. Major obstacles to the adoption of formal techniques in practical software development are 1) the lack of standard languages for specifying systemand software requirements, 2) the lack of... View full abstract»

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  • Is there a gap between RE research and RE practice ?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):73 - 74
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  • What do you mean I've been practicing without a license? Certification & licensing of requirements engineering professionals

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 151
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  • What do you mean I'm practicing without a license? certification and licensing of requirements engineering professionals

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 152
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  • Certitude and rectitude

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 153
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (61 KB)

    There is a fundamental difference between certification (which is intended to give you the feeling that someone or something is doing the right thing) and correctness (for which you hopefully have some well-founded reason to believe that someone or something is doing the right thing - with respect to appropriate definitions of what is right). Certification is typically nowhere near enough; correct... View full abstract»

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  • Two positions on licensing

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):154 - 155
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (510 KB)

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  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 197
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  • Requirements engineering: what have we accomplished? where are we now? where are we going?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s): 195
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  • The requirement set

    Publication Year: 2000
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    Three tools are proposed to assist requirement engineers in improving the overall quality of the requirement set. The Requirement Allocation Activity (RAA) is the activity that delegates the responsibility of requirement development to the appropriate organization. The multi-dimensional Requirement Cube Model (RCM) is a tool that organizes and aligns all requirements to the corporate structure ens... View full abstract»

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  • Establishing reuse measurement practices in SAP requirements engineering

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):168 - 177
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)

    The paper reports on first attempts to define, apply and fully integrate some reuse measurement practices into the SAP requirements engineering activities. It addresses all the facets of the context for SAP requirements reuse measurement and indicates who reuse metrics data are collected for, where and when during the RE process reuse measurements are made, what counting standards are appropriate,... View full abstract»

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  • Lightweight validation of natural language requirements: a case study

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):140 - 148
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)

    The authors report on their experiences of using lightweight formal methods for the partial validation of natural language (NL) requirements documents. They describe a case study based on part of NASA's specification of the Node Control Software of the International Space Station, and apply to it their method of checking properties on models obtained by shallow parsing of natural language requirem... View full abstract»

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  • Scalable mechanisms for requirements interaction management

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):119 - 129
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (552 KB)

    Capturing requirements, and managing tradeoffs among them, are critical yet complex activities. Well-designed computerized tools can effectively support these activities. A key challenge in construction of these support tools is how to scale them to handle a large volume of information. Particularly crucial are the ways in which large numbers of requirements and their interrelationships are presen... View full abstract»

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  • A framework for multi-notation requirements specification and analysis

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):39 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)

    Many organizations desire the convenience of using multiple notations within a requirements specification. Rather than using separate tools for each notation, we advocate combining the parts semantically for tool-based analysis. We describe a framework for integrating notations from four distinct categories, namely “models”, “events”, “actions, and “expressions&... View full abstract»

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  • Why is it so difficult to introduce requirements engineering research results into mainstream requirements engineering practice?

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):75 - 76
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)

    First Page of the Article
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  • Requirements documentation: why a formal basis is essential

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):81 - 82
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (116 KB)

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  • Essential and incidental complexity in requirements models

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):130 - 139
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)

    A deep understanding of the complexity of the requirements model and its dynamics is critical in improving requirements engineering process management. Findings from an action research study an insightful explanation of how the complexity of the requirements model evolves over time. We argue that there are two different types of complexity of the model: the essential and incidental complexities. T... View full abstract»

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  • A reference model for requirements and specifications - extended abstract

    Publication Year: 2000
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (64 KB)

    Summary form only given. The article proposes a simple abstraction of the artifacts and activities of software development (C.A. Gunter et al., 2000). Its purpose is to serve as a framework for discussion and comparison in software engineering, just as the ISO 7-Layer Reference Model has served in the networking area. The reference model is a more complete and formal treatment of some earlier work... View full abstract»

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  • A process framework for requirements analysis and specification

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):27 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)

    This paper presents a new approach for linking requirements engineering activities into a process framework that can be used as a reference for driving concrete requirements engineering processes. Special emphasis is placed on constructing problem domain models in order to build a common understanding of the problem context, to situate user requirements with reference to it, and as a technique for... View full abstract»

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  • A lightweight approach to consistency of scenarios and class models

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):49 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (176 KB)

    Today, object-oriented requirements specifications typically combine a scenario (or use case) model and a class model for expressing functional requirements. With any such combination, the problem of consistency between these two models arises. We present a lightweight approach to consistency between a scenario model and a class model. We assume semi-formal, loosely coupled models that are complem... View full abstract»

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  • On the challenges of business modeling in large-scale reengineering projects

    Publication Year: 2000, Page(s):17 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)

    Modeling existing and future business processes is crucial to the outcome of large-scale reengineering projects. The use of parameterized or standard components does not render business models redundant, but shifts the modeling focus even more from technical aspects to the real-world business processes. In current reengineering projects, however, there is often a lack of coordination of modeling a... View full abstract»

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