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Simulation Symposium, 2000. (SS 2000) Proceedings. 33rd Annual

Date 16-20 April 2000

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  • Proceedings 33rd Annual Simulation Symposium (SS 2000)

    Publication Year: 2000
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 338
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • DSPTune: a performance evaluation toolset for the SHARC signal processor

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 51 - 57
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    Performance tuning in the embedded systems domain poses a new set of challenges for software and hardware designers. Techniques proven to work for general purpose architectures cannot always be directly applied to the signal processor environment. Program analysis and simulation tools have been shown to be available in the analysis of general purpose microprocessors. We anticipate that similar tools will be needed to analyze the characteristics of signal processing architectures and applications as well. To meet this need, we have developed DSPTune, a program analysis toolset for the Analog Devices' SHARC DSP. This paper describes our toolset, and provides examples of its use View full abstract»

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  • Performance analysis of multiprocessor architectures via analytical simulation

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 326 - 332
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    The performance analysis of network architectures is a very crucial factor in designing multiprocessor systems. Very often, simulation is the only feasible method because of the nature of the problem and because analytical techniques become too difficult to handle. However simulation can be costly to develop and run. The mathematical analysis approach is preferable but in most cases not applicable. This paper presents an analytical simulation method that can be used for the evaluation of interconnection network architectures that are based on buffered banyan networks. This method comprises the probabilistic analysis and the simulation technique, with the help of a mathematical software package MathConnex (of MathSoft Corporation). The analysis enables us to observe the behavior of various stages of the network architecture, under various traffic conditions View full abstract»

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  • Simulation-trace-based component performance prediction

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 283 - 290
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    Large software systems are composed of interdependent distributed components, some developed in-house, some commercially available, and others developed by the customer. The system architecture, that is, the components comprising the system and their interconnections, typically varies for each design. Performance prediction is important for such software, including helping designers to select better designs and helping them to adjust the software architecture for better performance. To predict the overall system performance, we must have performance data for each component. Performance modelling for reused components was reported elsewhere. This paper presents a technology and its accompanying tool suite to obtain performance models of new components in a formal software architectural design specification given in a communicating extended finite state machine (CEFSM) model. Performance data for such new components are not available and must be collected through simulation. Our technique includes three steps: component specification instrumentation; simulation; and component stochastic performance model derivation from simulation trace. We applied our technology to a telecom application to predict the performance of its new components. Combined with the performance models of reused components from previous work, we were able to predict performance of the entire architectural design View full abstract»

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  • Using the DEVS paradigm to implement a simulated processor

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 58 - 65
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    This work is devoted to present the design and implementation of Alfa-I, a simulated computer with educational purposes. The DEVS formalism was used to attack the complexity of the design, allowing the definition of individual components that can be lately integrated into a modelling hierarchy. The tool is designed for the use in Computer Architecture and Organization courses. Its goal is allowing the students to acquire some practice in the design and implementation of hardware components by using simulation View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and simulation of a fault tolerant ATM switching architecture

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 42 - 47
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    Multistage interconnection networks (MINs) have been proposed as the switching fabrics for B-ISDN. With the throughput requirement of the packet switches exceeding several gigabits/sec, it becomes important to make them fault tolerant. To provide fault tolerance and improve network performance, a new fault-tolerant, self-routing, and high performance switching architecture for ATM networks based on MINs is proposed. It consists of two closely linked Banyan networks. Links are provided at every stage to allow cells to transfer to and from each plane. The performance and the reliability of the proposed architecture is compared to the other networks. The proposed network has low cell loss rate probabilities than other networks for both fault-free and faulty environments. Routing is kept simple as in basic MINs. Furthermore, the proposed switch architecture is modular in its design making it ideal for VLSI implementation View full abstract»

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  • Development of an object oriented simulation engine for on-line simulation and optimization

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 291 - 298
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    An object oriented (OO), discrete event simulation engine for on-line simulation applications has been conceptualized, designed, developed and tested. This paper describes the concepts, the advantages of OO simulation and results achieved in a near-real-time application. Flexibility to customize, real time state initiation, and capability for modeling complex resource and process relationships are some of the salient features. The objective of the work is to demonstrate the use of the developed OO simulation engine in the semiconductor backend manufacturing operation for dynamic scheduling applications, and optimization of equipment utilization cycle time and delivery performance. Capability for “what if” analysis and auto generation of simulation models at a desired frequency are examples of other features considered in the development View full abstract»

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  • Integrating discrete and continuous phenomena models into practical advanced user interface specifications

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 309 - 316
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    Most current user interface specification languages and toolkits are based on serial, discrete, token exchange paradigms that perform an acceptable job of implementing traditional WIMP (Window, Icon, Menu, Pointer) interfaces. These tools, however are ill suited to address the needs of emerging interaction studies such as virtual environments and interactive simulations. These interaction styles commonly rely upon full duplex, asynchronous, interrelated dialogues, a blend of continuous and discrete inputs and responses, and implicit commands and probabilistic input events. Some forms of non-WIMP interfaces, particularly interactive simulations, must also contend with real time processing constraints and deadline-based computations. This work proposes a specification paradigm, the SHADOW system, which directly addresses these issues. This system has been demonstrated to allow both the semantic meaning and behavior of all simulation elements to be clearly defined in a reusable fashion while providing support for good software engineering practices View full abstract»

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  • Mean estimation based on phi-mixing sequences

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 237 - 244
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This paper discusses the implementation of two sequential procedures to construct confidence intervals for a simulation estimator of the steady-state mean of a stochastic process. Our quasi-independent-mean (QIM) methods attempt to obtain i.i.d. samples. We show that our sequential procedures give valid confidence intervals. The two assumptions required are that the stochastic-process output sequence is continuous and satisfies the φ-mixing conditions. The algorithm dynamically increases the simulation run length so that the mean estimate satisfies a pre-specified precision requirement View full abstract»

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  • Scheduling strategies for multitasking in a distributed system

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 83 - 90
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    We study various policies for scheduling tasks in distributed processor queues. Their performance is studied and compared for a variety of workloads. It is our intention to find a policy that increases throughput and also is fair to jobs. Simulation results indicate that the policy that schedules the shortest task in a queue, when there is not any other task that has been waiting more than some configurable period of time, yields good system performance and also provides a guarantee for fairness in individual job execution View full abstract»

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  • Specifying truck movement in traffic models using cell-DEVS

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 66 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    A specification language was defined to outline sections of cities as cell spaces. The goal is to allow the definition of complex traffic models in a simple fashion for the modeler. Once the urban section is outlined, the traffic flow is automatically set up. In this case, the language was expanded to include the behavior of trucks. The models are formally specified, avoiding a high number of errors in the developed application, and the problem solving time can be reduced View full abstract»

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  • A methodology centered on modularization of QoS constraints for the development and performance evaluation of multimedia systems

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 177 - 184
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    This paper proposes a methodology for the development of multimedia systems. It is based on a time-sensitive, reflective actor framework that centers on light-weight actors, non-overkilling concurrent and customizable constraint-directed scheduling. A multimedia system can be visualized as a collection of media actors, i.e., autonomous, concurrent and computational processing entities, involved in multimedia sessions. QoS requirements associated to a multimedia session are incorporated in reflective actors called QoSsynchronizers that manage and enforce application-dependent QoS parameters. Timing QoS parameters are first specified by using Time Stream Petri Nets and then translated in terms of a QoSsychronizer. In order to support QoS constraints analysis and validation, media actors and QoSsynchronizers are prototyped under simulation by exploiting a flexibility of the adopted framework to operate transparently under virtual or real time. This a seamless transition from the modeling to the implementation stages can be obtained. The paper describes the use of the methodology for the development of live and on-demand multimedia applications View full abstract»

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  • IRLSim: a general purpose packet level network simulator

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 109 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Simulation is the main tool for studying networking protocols before deploying them in a wide scale, or for understanding how they are expected to behave under various conditions. IRLSim is a new packet level network simulator that we developed in the hope to study several Internet protocols. From its modest inception as a simulator for the RSVP signaling protocol, IRLSim has evolved into a more general purpose, easy to use, scalable simulator that can be used as a guide for studying existing network protocols as well as a research tool for developing new protocols. This paper describes the architecture of IRLSim in detail, presents its use in the study of a few specific networking problems and argues about its usefuless amongst the variety of other simulators View full abstract»

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  • Active virtual guides as an apparatus for augmented reality based telemanipulation system on the Internet

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 185 - 191
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (10)
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    In many current teleoperation architectures, remote tasks are indirectly performed by a human operator (HO) by means of a virtual environment consisting in a virtual or symbolic representation of the remote site. In order to achieve virtual tasks, the interaction of the HO and the virtual representation is monitored. Monitoring results are subsequently translated into a sequence of instructions sent to the remote robot for actual execution. This paper focuses on different strategies designed to allow a user-friendly operator interaction with the virtual representation in order to achieve complex remote tasks via the Internet. The use of active virtual guides to assist the HO in performing simple or complex tasks with enhanced performance (speed, precision and safety) is also discussed. Techniques such as virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) combined with Internet-based programming facilities are investigated as part of the proposed teleoperation system named ARITI (acronym for Augmented Reality Interface for Telerobotic applications via Internet) View full abstract»

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  • On QoS multicasting performance in wide area networks

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 25 - 32
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    Multicasting enables applications to scale to a large number of users without overloading the network and server resources. With the advent of multimedia applications, the focus of multicasting research has shifted from minimizing the overall cost of the multicast tree to finding one which supports the QoS requirements of the underlying multimedia application. Finding such a tree, however, is NP-complete. Several heuristics, such SPH, KPP, BSMA, and K-SLIM, have been proposed as an approximation of the optimal solution to the multimedia multicasting problem. These heuristics differ in their complexity, overhead and the way they minimize tree cost and end-to-end delay. This paper develops a simulation framework to study and compare the performance of these heuristics. Using the above framework, the multimedia multicast heuristics were tested with respect to the graph size, the multicast group size, and the delay requirements of the underlying multimedia traffic. The simulation results show that, an average, K-SLIM outperforms the other simulated heuristics. Furthermore, the results also show that the average cost of the multicast trees produced by SLIM+, a variation of K-SLIM which requires must less overhead, is close to the average cost of the multicast trees produced by K-SLIM View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and simulation of a network of workstations with wormhole switching

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 299 - 306
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    Networks of workstations (NOW) are becoming a very popular alternative to parallel computers for those applications with high needs of resources such as memory capacity processing power and input/output storage space. Typically, these networks connect workstations using irregular topologies, providing wiring flexibility, scalability, and incremental expansion capability required in this environment. In order to analyze and design these kind of systems it is necessary to have adequate tools. To address this problem, we have implemented a very flexible and easy to use NOW simulator. It is based on the one presented in (Silla, 1998; Silla and Duato, 1997; 1998) and it includes three more functionalities: it supports a technique for message fragmentation in packets, generates self-similar traffic, and also it can model networks with permanent faulted links or switches. We present this NOW simulator, the basic queueing models it is based on, its main internal organization, input parameters, output performance variables, and finally, we show several simple examples of performance measures obtained for, among others, message fragmentation, failures in links and switches, and self-similar traffic View full abstract»

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  • Proactive fault-management in software systems

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 3
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  • Exploring CORSIM runtime characteristics: profiling a traffic simulator

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 139 - 146
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The runtime characteristics of CORSIM, a traffic corridor software simulator are presented. The simulator was profiled under both the NT and Linux operating systems. Profiling identifies bottleneck simulator function categories. Functions devoted to event scheduling and simulation overhead account for 80%-90% of CORSIM runtime View full abstract»

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  • Multiresolution behavioral modeling in a virtual environment

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 192 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This paper aims to speed up physical simulation of a complex model by making use of several levels of simulation details, which are determined according to the observer position. Multiple dynamically simulated sailing boats in a virtual lake are created as a test environment for the implementation. Both consistency and completeness are satisfied in the proposed method of simulation View full abstract»

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  • Modeling and analysis of software aging and rejuvenation

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 270 - 279
    Cited by:  Papers (35)  |  Patents (2)
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    Software systems are known to suffer from outages due to transient errors. Recently, the phenomenon of “software aging”, one in which the state of the software system degrades with time, has been reported. To counteract this phenomenon, a proactive approach of fault management, called “software rejuvenation”, has been proposed. This essentially involves gracefully terminating an application or a system and restarting it in a clean internal state. We discuss stochastic models to evaluate the effectiveness of proactive fault management in operational software systems and determine optimal times to perform rejuvenation, for different scenarios. The latter part of the paper deals with measurement-based methodologies to detect software aging and estimate its effect on various system resources. Models are constructed using workload and resource usage data collected from the UNIX operating system over a period of time. The measurement-based models are intended to help development of strategies for software rejuvenation triggered by actual measurements View full abstract»

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  • MICA: a memory and interconnect simulation environment for cache-based architectures

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 317 - 325
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    MICA is a new-generation simulation environment, which provides complete simulation facilities for simulating distributed shared memory (DSM) multiprocessors. It runs on the inexpensive Linux-based PCs. MICA uses application traces as inputs and provides a core scheduler and memory, and interconnect interfaces. A rich set of synchronization algorithms and architecture simulator are also provided. We introduce the MICA simulator environment and demonstrate its use in investigating the effectiveness of one-to-many (multicast) communication for write invalidation in DSM multiprocessors View full abstract»

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  • Simulation optimization of airline delay using simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 253 - 258
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    Air traffic delay is a growing and expensive problem. We looked at ways to reduce the cost and magnitude of such delays by trading gate delays against more expensive air delays. Air management and planning at this level can be facilitated by simulation, especially for strategies that alter controls on the system. We used the SIMMOD air traffic simulation to model the system. Since the model is stochastic, these measures are noisy. The objective was to determine a set of control measures that achieve the best system performance subject to restrictions on the decision parameters and selected outputs of the model. This is a constrained stochastic optimization problem with nonlinear objective function and nonlinear stochastic constraints which requires efficient stochastic optimization methods for its solution. Our approach used simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) with a penalty function to handle the difficult constraints View full abstract»

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  • Sequential dynamical systems and applications to simulations

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 245 - 252
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Computer simulations are extensively used for business and science applications. However a simulation generically generates a certain class of dynamical system whose properties are poorly understood. We address some theoretical issues of computer simulations and illustrate our concepts for the simulation of circular one-lane traffic. We propose a certain class of discrete dynamical systems (SDS) that captures key features of computer simulations and then show how SDS techniques can be applied to a case of infrastructure simulations View full abstract»

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  • Multi-resolution modeling of power converter using waveform reconstruction

    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 165 - 174
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Computer simulation of switching power converters is complicated by the discontinuous (switching) nature of the converter waveforms. When switching details of the waveform are of interest, detailed simulations requiring extremely small time steps are needed. On the other hand, so-called averaged models allow capture of low-frequency converter dynamics (of interest for example when closing the feedback loop) by computing averaged continuous waveforms. The possibility of using relatively large time steps makes averaged models computationally efficient. A real-time hierarchical approach that combines the advantages of the two methods is proposed. An averaged model and a detailed model are used alternately in successive time intervals. The final state of one model at the end of a time interval is used to calculate the initial conditions for the other model running in the following time interval. The method is illustrated with a buck converter. The combined use of two models with a hierarchical or multilevel approach is shown to provide a powerful simulation tool for analysis and design. The detailed model is used 10% of the time and the averaged model 90% of the time. Results indicate that the detailed behavior is accurately simulated when the detailed model runs and the overall simulation time cost is lowered by running the averaged model 90% of the time. This approach provides a way to simulate the detailed behavior of a specific part in a rather large switching circuit network View full abstract»

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