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Engineering of Computer Based Systems, 2000. (ECBS 2000) Proceedings. Seventh IEEE International Conference and Workshopon the

Date 3-7 April 2000

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  • Proceedings Seventh IEEE International Conference and Workshop on the Engineering of Computer Based Systems (ECBS 2000)

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE/IFIP Joint Workshop on Formal Specifications of Computer-Based Systems

    Page(s): 382
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Page(s): 398
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrating CAD and CAM via CORBA

    Page(s): 3 - 8
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    CAD and CAM were developed independently in the past. CAD was heavily influenced by Computer Graphics, whereas CAM by NC (Numerical Control) Integrating them turns out to be the challenge of the century. The integration of CAD and CAM in terms of CORBA is explored. Then Open I-DEAS is presented as a special case View full abstract»

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  • Discrete event system specification (DEVS) and StateMate StateCharts equivalence for embedded systems modeling

    Page(s): 308 - 316
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    Recently, modeling has received a lot of attention in the design of embedded computing systems. StateCharts is one of the modeling specifications which has been successfully implemented in a commercially available tool suite. We argue that the DEVS formalism is more expressive than StateCharts and can also be applied to the design of such systems. In this paper we want to show that we can in fact build equivalent StateChart models directly from DEVS models and execute them in the available development environments. The presented mapping of the two system modeling formalisms promises to combine the benefits of formally well-defined models and a sound tool implementation View full abstract»

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  • Application of factorial design to validation of system performance

    Page(s): 318 - 326
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    System verification and validation are performed to secure that a system fulfils the different quality aspects, such as reliability, functionality, maintainability, performance and user friendliness. Since the verification and validation activities take a large share of the total project budget, efficiency and effectiveness are key issues. In this paper a method is presented for application of the well-known technique for experimental planning, factorial design, to validation of system performance. The proposed method is applied in this case study to the validation of the effectiveness of a radar system. It is concluded that the factorial design is a considerable support for the validation planning, enabling efficient system performance validation. The cost reduction was in this case 40%, compared with the previously used method. At the same time more information of the effects of factors was gained View full abstract»

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  • Designing a model-based interaction planner with dialogue analysis

    Page(s): 82 - 90
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    We present an approach to computer-based training that takes advantage of two techniques related to modelling. Dialogue modelling (DM) and model-based training (MBT) are examined here with a view to using DM to provide the models needed in MBT. Our work is motivated by the fact that certain domains are very difficult to produce models for, which makes MBT impracticable. We describe a computer-based training agent that has been developed as a result of using dialogue analysis and DM techniques. MBT is investigated as a technique that could be compatible with DM to support instruction through use of dynamic model-based explanations. Together these two techniques enable a computer-based training system to be designed that is able to support technical skills, such as controlling a power plant, and creative skills, such as design View full abstract»

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  • Java-prototyping of hardware/software CBS using a behavioral OO model

    Page(s): 73 - 81
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    This paper presents a method to build software-prototypes of Computer-Based Systems (CBS) that describe and simulate parts of software and parts of hardware using a common concurrent software Behavioral Object Oriented Model (BOOM). For the hardware objects this behavioral prototyping can be viewed as a pre-stage of specification and analysis before the real physical design. The CBS prototypes are built in Java using a method called Vowels2. This method permits the development of the prototype as a concurrent application, from the user-requirements to the software programming in Java. The process of prototype description is made step by step. These steps use a subset of the UML graphical diagrams. The Java coding is deduced from these commented diagrams, using general patterns of thread-active-objects linked by customized objects: synchronous stimuli, asynchronous FIFO-queues etc. The method is illustrated by a simplified example containing parallelism synchronization: the blood-test machine View full abstract»

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  • Architecture-based performance analysis of the COLLINS class submarine open system extension (COSE) concept demonstrator (CD)

    Page(s): 26 - 35
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    Being able to predict the overall performance of a computer based system, prior to building it, is one of the greatest challenges facing system engineers today. The emerging discipline of system architecture, by defining a high level abstraction of the overall structure of the system, hopes to provide the foundation for this reasoning. The authors demonstrate an architecture-based performance analysis technique on the COLLINS class submarine Open System Extension (COSE) Concept Demonstrator (CD) system. The layered architectural design of the COSE CD system, together with it's normally probabilistic, repeatable and predictable nature for varying loads, makes it suitable to an architecture-based approach to performance analysis. An architectural model of the system is developed and populated and then used to predict the performance characteristics of service time, waiting time, response time and device utilisation. These predictions are then verified against theoretical performance predictions and validated against a preliminary implementation of the system View full abstract»

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  • A choice of SM/DM parallel ANN implementation for embedded applications

    Page(s): 18 - 23
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    This paper examines implementations of a multi-layer perceptron (MLP) on bus-based shared memory (SM) and on distributed memory (DM) multiprocessor systems. The goal has been to optimize HW and SW architectures in order to obtain the fastest response possible. Prototyping parallel MLP algorithms for up to 8 processing nodes with the DM as well as SM memory was done using CSP-based TRANSIM tool. The results of prototyping MLPs of different sizes on various number of processing nodes demonstrate the feasible speedups, efficiency and time responses for the given CPU speed, link speed or bus bandwidth View full abstract»

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  • Assisting the definition and execution of test suites for complex systems

    Page(s): 327 - 333
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    The concept of assisted test procedure definition is presented. This approach is compared to other work in the system testing field. The architecture of an environment to support this concept is described. This is based on the work on the satellite check-out area. The authors claim that this architecture can be general enough to support many of the application domains. A prototype for the telecom world, already implemented according to this architecture, is described. Conclusions on the validity of the hypothesis and further use of this fact are stated View full abstract»

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  • The Virtual Automation Lab-Web based teaching of automation engineering concepts

    Page(s): 156 - 164
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    Our Virtual Automation Lab is a Web based interactive learning environment for both Computer Science and Automation Engineering concepts within a virtual university setting. We describe three Lab exercises in which students learn how to operate CAN fieldbus devices without any physical proximity to the devices themselves. One of the exercises is a pure simulation realized with a Java applet. In the other exercises, Java applets provide a remote interface to a server which acts as a bridge between the Internet and the CAN fieldbus. No proprietary software has to be installed and no browser plug-ins are needed to access the devices via the Internet. While our exercises pave the ground for teaching Lab based courses over the Internet, or enriching physical Labs with virtual devices that are located elsewhere, our Java based software solutions may also form the basis for industrial applications like remote control, monitoring, maintenance, or data acquisition View full abstract»

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  • Forensic ECBS: A Situational Assessment

    Page(s): 390 - 392
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    First Page of the Article
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  • A survey of software reuse repositories

    Page(s): 92 - 100
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    Reuse libraries are organizations of personnel, procedures, tools, and software components directed toward facilitating software component reuse to meet specific cost-effectiveness and productivity goals. The paper gives a survey of the major software reusable component repositories. This survey will be a base to develop future efficiently searchable, user-friendly, useful, and well-organized repositories View full abstract»

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  • Limited software warranties

    Page(s): 56 - 61
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    Because there are different types of software (e.g., language, application, target environment, etc.), different software certification methodologies are needed. Software process improvement schemes have not taken this approach and have therefore suffered in widespread adoption as a result. Their “one approach fits all” perspective is one reason why we are now seeing more customized process improvement schemes being created (e.g., CMM-SSE and the Common Criteria are recent “newcomers” that address developing software with security requirements) and even the call to certify software professionals. This paper presents a framework for customizing certification methodologies according to: (1) the specific needs of the organization requesting assurances about the software's integrity, and (2) the pecularities of that type of software. Each methodology must mirror the nuances of the type of software it was designed for. For example, certifying that a desktop plug-in will behave appropriately requires a different set of assessment technologies than the set of technologies needed to certify that an aircraft control system will behave appropriately. The goal of creating a certification framework is to provide a more systematic way to create and compare software certification methodologies which today does not exist. And from there, we will be able to offer limited software warranties View full abstract»

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  • On the design of ORBIT

    Page(s): 110 - 118
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    Design of highly complex systems relies on effective utilization of multiple tools. The tools vary with the aspect of the design the user is currently interested in. Also, the approaches used to verify the correctness of the design are different for different domains. Because of the importance of verifying the correctness of the design, there is considerable interest in utilizing the different approaches and tools in a complementary manner to provide higher degrees of assurance. Unfortunately, due to constraints on the model representations and incompatibilities among the various tools, heterogeneous design and analysis is not feasible. The ORBIT project was envisaged to address this problem. ORBIT is an heterogeneous, component-based design and analysis environment. This paper presents the original requirements of this environment, details the various design decisions taken towards satisfying the requirements, and presents an overview of the implementation. In particular it discusses the generic framework used (GRAVITY), the integration of simulation and formal verification within the design process, automatic generation of proof obligations for checking designs, verification of constraints in the designs and work on re-usability using persistent storage View full abstract»

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  • Integrating the components of an intelligent telecom design tool into an agent-based framework

    Page(s): 196 - 204
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    This paper describes the integration of a telecommunications design tool with an agent-based messaging framework. The design tool is broken down into two major components, which are modified to conform to the agent paradigm, and placed within the framework. This brings several benefits including the possibility of other agent-based applications being able to take advantage of the design tool components, the relatively easy extension of the design tool to be a multiuser, multi-server system, and the ease in which the design tool can be extended with new components View full abstract»

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  • Multimedia systems: on the ergonomic design and evaluation of user interfaces and system structures

    Page(s): 256 - 262
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    Based on the concept of interdependence between user surface and internal system structure in multimedia systems, we derive ergonomic development criteria and consequences for the development process, and present a short example-points of information-taken from an ongoing project. Special emphasis will be given to the possible evaluation of multimedia systems with regards to their ergonomic attributes View full abstract»

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  • Component-based control system

    Page(s): 176 - 184
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    In industrial automation it is usual to reuse many well-defined hardware components. The use of these hardware components helps to reduce the price considerably. In this paper we introduce an approach to build industrial control software from software components in order to achieve the same benefits as those of the hardware reuse. Component systems are more flexible, extensible, portable and therefore a promising contribution to the current state of software engineering. A model with different types of components and relationships between components is introduced. This onion skin-like model classifies the components in core components and peripheral components. Although the presented model fits very well for the development and reuse of component-oriented systems in the world of industrial control systems with its standardized hardware components it may also be applied in other application domains such as business applications or distributed systems View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing architectural mismatch detection with assumptions

    Page(s): 138 - 146
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    Detecting software architecture inconsistencies is a critical issue in software design. Software systems are described in terms of components, component behavior and interaction and mismatch detection is explored through techniques based on behavior analysis. Integration problems, however, are not only caused by behavioral mismatch: components make assumptions about their environment to guarantee functional and non-functional properties. If the actual deployment environment of each component does not satisfy its assumptions, component and system properties may not hold. In this work we propose to extend the idea of architectural mismatch to include the notion of assumption. We concentrate on a subset of possible assumptions and show how software architects can benefit from using them. We also present a discussion on how architecture description languages (ADLs) can be extended to include assumptions View full abstract»

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  • A component coordination model for customization and composition of component-based system design

    Page(s): 228 - 236
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    We introduce a Component Coordination Model for supporting the design of computer-based systems using middleware infrastructure and a method for incorporating this model into the systems. We focus only on exposing the design for customization and composition of component-based systems to be separated from the design of components. These separated concerns (coordination and computation) form the principal concept of our model. They encapsulate the implementation details of component coordinations and interactions, in the distributed computing environment, into coordination entities (Interaction Entities). We describe the customization and composition abstraction levels for specifying common component framework including policies, protocols, and rules that manage and coordinate the component interdependencies in a given use-context View full abstract»

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  • The use of architecture description languages to describe a distributed measurement system

    Page(s): 185 - 193
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    This paper describes and specifies architectural features of an industrial distributed measurement system, using two architectural description languages (ADLs). A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the ADLs is given View full abstract»

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  • A Java-based CSCW tool for supporting software processes

    Page(s): 368 - 374
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    PSTOOL is designed as a tool of the supporting environment based on P-F method. The P-F method is a description methodology for supporting software processes improvements. It consists of concept model and implementation model. The mechanism of CSCW on the WWW within PSTOOL is described by the user awareness rules, client/server architecture with Java applet. An example of BugFix process on discussing subsystem is used for declaring the flexibility of P-F process's describing power View full abstract»

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  • Software agents and computer network security

    Page(s): 211 - 217
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    Preventing unauthorised access to corporate information systems is essential for many organisations. To address this problem we built a security enhancement software system using software agents, in which a core software agent resides on a server and user end software agents reside at each user workstation. By downloading a pattern of typical user behaviour and rules governing invalid behaviour from a core agent to each user end agent, all decisions and actions about atypical or invalid user behaviour can be taken by a user agent. This permits security detection to continue even when the core agent fails to operate View full abstract»

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