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Simulation Conference Proceedings, 1999 Winter

Date 5-8 Dec. 1999

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  • WSC'99. 1999 Winter Simulation Conference Proceedings. 'Simulation - A Bridge to the Future' (Cat. No.99CH37038)

    Publication Year: 1999
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • What does industry need from simulation vendors in Y2k and after? a panel discussion

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1501 - 1508
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Index

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1709 - 1713
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Applications for enterprise simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1490 - 1495 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (680 KB)  

    The purpose of the paper is to describe several recent applications of enterprise simulation. An enterprise simulation is a simulation which is constructed with a top-down view of a business enterprise and which is intended to serve as a decision support tool for decision makers. Examples are taken from the domain areas of transportation, urban operations, supply chain management, entertainment, and manufacturing. The objective is to help clarify the meaning of the term enterprise simulation and to promote its use as an important management tool View full abstract»

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  • Automated distributed system testing: designing an RTI verification system

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1094 - 1102 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB)  

    A project is currently underway which involves testing a distributed system-the Run Time Infrastructure (RTI) component of the High Level Architecture (HLA). As part of this effort, a test suite has been designed and implemented to provide a coordinated and automated approach to testing this distributed system. This suite includes the creation and application of a Script Definition Language (SDL) to specify test sequences, and a test executive to control execution of the tests, coordinate the test environment, and record test results. This paper describes the design and implementation of this test environment View full abstract»

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  • Sizing industrial rail car fleets using discrete-event simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1258 - 1261 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB)  

    DuPont has many products that use rail cars in various portions of their supply chains. Often these cars are used to deliver final products to a variety of customers at different geographical locations. In many cases it is difficult to optimally size these fleets, since the underlying system is complex, dynamic, and involves random variables. This paper describes how DuPont has used discrete-event simulation (“DES”) to optimally size an industrial rail car fleet used to deliver final products to customers. It explains why it is important to DuPont to optimize the size of our rail car fleets; how such fleets are sized without DES; the value of DES in modeling one particular rail car system; and some of the lessons from building such DES models View full abstract»

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  • Designing the Westerscheldetunnel toll plaza using a combination of queueing and simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1272 - 1279 vol.2
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    This paper describes how a combined queueing and simulation study was successfully executed for the design of a toll plaza. The objectives of the study were twofold: to configure the types of toll booths with multiple payment functionalities (cash, credit cards, and electronic payment). To determine the number of toll booths for each type. The model was also used to validate the spacing, safety, and accessibility of the toll plaza. A hybrid approach of simulation and queueing theory proved to be a powerful method in analyzing the queueing processes of the toll plaza. This approach combined the insights from queueing theory with the practical applicability of simulation. Queueing theory provided the conceptual framework and limited the number of variants to be examined, while simulation was used to compare and evaluate the variants. The study showed that fewer toll booths were needed when different payment systems were separated, as a combination of different payment systems at one toll booth would substantially enlarge the variability of service times. This variability appeared to dominate the `inefficiency' of separate toll booths which may seem counterintuitive. Consequently, the initial design had to be completely redesigned View full abstract»

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  • A simulation approach for improving the efficiency of the Department of Motor Vehicles

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1681 - 1684 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    Simulation as a primary tool was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the Santa Teresa Department of Motor Vehicles, California (USA). The Department of Motor Vehicles was analyzed to determine improvement methods that would curtail the long customer lines or queues that are prevalent. A 23 factorial experimental design was performed to improve overall system effectiveness as measured by time in the system. With the above tools, a more efficient model of the Santa Teresa Department of Motor Vehicles was developed and proposed. The paper describes the developed model used and provides details on the analysis performed View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating the potential benefits of a rail traffic movement planning algorithm

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1181 - 1185 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  

    Railroads have large investments in capital items such as track, trains and terminals. Optimizing the use of their resources has the potential of enormous payback. Precision Train ControlTM (PTC) is an effort to optimize the flow of trains on the railroad line in order to increase the return on capital. This paper describes a study whose purpose was to quantify the performance improvements that could be anticipated with PTC. A large-scale simulation involving approximately 1000 miles of track and 700 trains was conducted to produce an estimate of potential improvement View full abstract»

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  • Quick response replenishment: a case study

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1341 - 1349 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (624 KB)  

    We document a case study based upon an ongoing analysis for a U.S. fiber/fabric manufacturer who is expanding its operations vertically to include cut and sew operations in Mexico. We refer to this vertically integrated manufacturer as VIM. While some of the data have been changed to protect the sources, the story and results themselves are unchanged. More detail on this case can be found in Moon (1999) View full abstract»

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  • Impact of connection bank redesign on airport gate assignment

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1378 - 1382 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    Along with marketing and maintenance implications, hub optimization is an important part of the flight schedule development process. The Air Canada flight schedule at its Toronto hub is based on two-hour non-directional connection banks. The purpose of this research is to analyze an alternative to this rule consisting of directional connection banks and, more specifically, to assess how this would impact the gate assignment performance View full abstract»

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  • Train performance and simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1287 - 1294 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (744 KB)  

    Simulation provides a valuable tool in both the design of new infrastructure coupled with assisting in the process of translating a railway's business aspiration into a technical specification. The simulation system can be used in many forms: (1) as a single train run to assess traction performance over a given infrastructure or assumptions of the physical characteristics of a new line, (2) to assess a range of signalling systems in order to identify the optimum solution to meet a service aspiration, or (3) to evaluate proposed timetables and the interaction between the trains at a complex junction or in major terminals. This paper seeks to demonstrate the varying levels of simulation and their key role in the support of railway projects and the benefits from integrating simulation tools View full abstract»

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  • Operative requirements and advances for the new generation simulators in multimodal container terminals

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1243 - 1252 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (852 KB)  

    The paper outlines the evolution of container terminal requirements for simulation and the potential of new advanced techniques in the integration with these aspects; the authors present application examples and experimental results that maximized the impact of these new concepts in real complex port realities View full abstract»

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  • Activity scheduling in the dynamic, multi-project setting: choosing heuristics through deterministic simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 937 - 941 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    Tools for project scheduling, such as Gantt charts and PERT/CPM networks, have existed for some time. However, these tools have significant shortcomings for settings characterized by constrained resources and multiple projects that arrive dynamically. The paper identifies the power and benefit that deterministic simulation can bring to the practice of project management and project scheduling. The paper is intended for those in the daily practice of project management, and those in the field of developing project management software. Deterministic simulation using available project data to choose an activity scheduling heuristic not only allows for the establishment of good project schedules, it determines ahead of time which resources will be assigned to specific project activities View full abstract»

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  • Scalable Integration Model for Objective Resource Capability Evaluations (SIM-FORCE)

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1316 - 1323 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB)  

    The Scalable Integration Model for Objective Resource Capability Evaluations (SIM-FORCE) provides Air Force decision-makers with a tool to evaluate potential actions and analyze expected results. The model evaluates the impact of schedule changes or resource availability on mission completion. It is a desktop tool that will support a wide variety of critical day to day decisions facing unit level managers. The simulation engine is built using Arena(R). The simulation models aircraft launch processes, system breaks or failures and the resources required to support the launch and repair of broke items. The processes modeled are similar to those used by most types of maintenance, regardless of the type of equipment being maintained, including aircraft, industrial presses, recreational vehicles and long haul trucks. The modeled maintenance process is designed to transition SIM-FORCE into a future generic tool that supports commercial as well as military maintenance applications View full abstract»

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  • The effect of state-saving in optimistic simulation on a cache-coherent non-uniform memory access architecture

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1624 - 1633 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (796 KB)  

    State-saving and reverse computation are two different approaches by which rollback is realized in Time Warp-based parallel simulation systems. Of the two approaches, state-saving is, in general, more memory-intensive than reverse computation. When executed on a state-of-the-art commercial CC-NUMA (Cache Coherent Non-Uniform Memory Architecture) multiprocessor, our Time Warp system runs almost 6 times slower if state-saving is used than if reverse computation is used. The focus of this paper is to understand why state-saving yields such poor performance when compared to reverse computation on a CC-NUMA multiprocessor. To address this question, we examined the low level machine performance statistics, especially those that relate to memory system performance, such as caching, and translation look-aside buffer (TLB) misses. The outcome of the performance study suggests that TLB misses are the primary culprit for state-saving's performance degradation View full abstract»

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  • Special purpose simulation template for utility tunnel construction

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 948 - 955 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB)  

    Utility construction projects have great opportunities for simulation applications in construction. The paper describes the special purpose tunneling simulation template developed based on the tunneling operations performed at the City of Edmonton Public Works Department for shielded tunnel boring machines. The tunneling operations are described, then the tunnel template and its components are illustrated. The results generated from the template using the historical data to test the template and to analyze the potential construction processes are presented. Future embellishments to the tunneling template are briefly described View full abstract»

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  • Supply chain vs. supply chain: using simulation to compete beyond the four walls

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1207 - 1214 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (820 KB)  

    It has been said, in this world of virtual corporations, that it is no longer companies that compete, but supply chains. When you look at the model of a corporation today, the traditional vertically-integrated business seems to be a thing of the past. A prime example of this is Nike. They own no factories, trucks or stores, yet are one of the world's most successful retail firms. Today's supply chains reflect this trend in that few firms control the entire supply chain from end to end. Most companies rely on a mix of suppliers, transportation resources, assemblers, warehousing firms and retail outlets to bring their product to the market. As a result of this mix of outside firms, it is often difficult to know the impact of changes or poor performance on the supply chain. What is needed is a tool that can give visibility to the entire supply chain and that allows for the testing of numerous “what-if” scenarios, such as outsourcing, consolidating vendors, collaborative planning or implementing e-business. Only with this capability will you and all of your supply-chain partners be able to effectively compete against your competitors' supply chains View full abstract»

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  • Defining a Beta distribution function for construction simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1010 - 1015 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (772 KB)  

    In most applications of simulation to construction, the underlying probability distribution function (PDF) is generally unknown. Consequently, an expert has to select a PDF hoping that the one that is chosen matches the shape of the underlying distribution. This research attempts to quantify, through a sensitivity analysis, the effect of subjective information in choosing parameters for a Beta distribution to be used in earthmoving simulation models View full abstract»

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  • The application of system dynamics (SD) simulation to enterprise management

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1496 - 1500 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  

    The paper presents the background and some of the lessons learned from a project in which system dynamics (SD) simulation was applied in the enterprise environment. The organization simulated is a large commercial concern, developing and marketing new products as well as existing products in a highly competitive environment. SD simulation was used to examine business practices, validate corporate performance measures, train senior leaders in systems thinking, and to produce a forecast of long term profits and loss. The application of SD to enterprise simulation is not new; the scale of this application, and some of the techniques used for design and rollout make the project unique View full abstract»

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  • Case study: simulation of the call center environment for comparing competing call routing technologies for business case ROI projection

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1694 - 1700 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    The paper describes how simulation was used for business case benefits and return on investment (ROI) projection for the procurement and rollout of a new call routing technology to 25 call centers. With investment costs of about 17 million dollars and annual operating costs of about 8 million for the new technology, we needed to determine if the technology would provide enough cost savings and cost avoidance (through reduced trunk costs, increased agent productivity, and ability to service more calls) to warrant its nationwide implementation. We constructed a model of the existing call center environment consisting of 25 call centers, where calls were distributed to the sites based on a system of percentage allocation routing; for example, the telephone network provider directs calls to each site, based on the number of agents scheduled. We then modeled the same call system dynamics and intricacies under the new call routing system, where calls are distributed based on longest available agent. Subsequently, we conducted average day simulations with light and heavy volumes and other “what if” laboratory analyses and experiments to facilitate planning decisions required to be documented and substantiated in the business case View full abstract»

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  • FEDEP V1.4: an update to the HLA process model

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1044 - 1049 vol.2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    The Department of Defense (DoD) High Level Architecture (HLA) for modeling and simulation (M&S) was developed as a means of facilitating interoperability among simulations and promoting reuse of simulations and their components. Although the three HLA specifications together provide the necessary technical foundation for developing distributed, interoperable simulation applications, they do not explicitly define how such applications are developed. In this regard, in order to provide practical guidance to the HLA user community, the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) has sponsored the creation of a process model that describes a structured, common sense approach to HLA federation development. This process model is known as the HLA Federation Development and Execution Process (FEDEP) Model. The primary purpose of the paper is to outline the modifications that have been incorporated in transitioning from FEDEP V1.3 to FEDEP V1.4. The paper also describes the Concept of Operations (ConOps) for how new releases of the FEDEP are produced, and identifies other related products which may be used in concert with the FEDEP to support the needs of HLA federation developers View full abstract»

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  • Simulating outpatient obstetrical clinics

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1557 - 1563 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB)  

    Computer simulation is a useful tool for addressing resource allocation problems in outpatient obstetrical clinics. We present a general framework for modeling such clinics for the purpose of exploring questions related to demand, appointment scheduling, exam room allocation, patient flow patterns and staffing. Modeling challenges are identified and solutions suggested. Examples from a project completed by the authors at a large obstetrical clinic are used to illustrate the concepts View full abstract»

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  • eSCA: a thin-client/server/Web-enabled system for distributed supply chain simulation

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1371 - 1377 vol.2
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB)  

    eSCA is a client server, Web-enabled architecture and front-end system for IBM's Supply Chain Analyzer (SCA), a new “best-of breed” software tool and methodology for measuring, analyzing, and reengineering complex supply chains. eSCA extends the capability of SCA through a computing network with server-based and Web-enabled functionality. ESCA consists of two distinct versions: eManager and Web-enabled SCA. The eManager version provides model catalogs, interactive modeling, seamless model/file transfer, batch experiments, and post-simulation data analysis. The Web-enabled version provides a rapid way for users to access SCA through the Web. The software development process for eSCA adopted the unified process: use-case driven, architecture-centric, iterative and incremental. This paper focuses on the eSCA use cases and the application architecture. It is shown that eSCA is a reusable architecture for many different applications View full abstract»

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  • Interfacing simulation with costing software to drive the transformation from prototype manufacturing to high volume manufacturing

    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 1359 - 1364 vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (476 KB)  

    Often companies are faced with the situation of “ramping-up” production of a new product. Although this may seem like it should be a simple task, making the transition from a manufacturing environment that makes small volumes of some product well to an environment that must make large volumes well entails many decisions regarding equipment, scheduling and control and manufacturing philosophy. Many factors influence these decisions, including the need to meet production volume goals and costs associated with achieving these goals. This paper discusses how discrete event simulation data can be interfaced with a costing software package to guide manufacturing line design decisions in a company transitioning from small volume, job-shop like manufacturing of a product to larger production run volume manufacturing View full abstract»

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