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AUTOTESTCON '99. IEEE Systems Readiness Technology Conference, 1999. IEEE

Date Aug. 30 1999-Sept. 2 1999

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 108
  • 1999 IEEE AUTOTESTCON Proceedings (Cat. No.99CH36323)

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Author index

    Page(s): 829 - 830
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Receiver Fixture Interface (RFI) IEEE P1505 system standard

    Page(s): 787 - 799
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    The Receiver Fixture Interface IEEE P1505 Standard is to improve ease of use and maintain RFI as a true, open multivendor architecture at the system level under the IEEE Standards Organization per the P1505 Standards and elements of the VXI Consortium and VXI plug&play specifications. Areas specified, but not mandated, include; Receiver/Fixture framework; connectors/contacts; pin mapping; fixturing; cabling; and common documentation approaches. A recommended approach for self-test and calibration will be developed to deliver major benefits to both vendors and end-users. The RFI Alliance is actively seeking instrument suppliers to develop modules meeting the standard. Interested parties are requested to contact the author View full abstract»

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  • Effective testability design for the product life-cycle

    Page(s): 607 - 612
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    Product life-cycle costs outweigh by a significant margin those of product design, manufacture, and purchase. Often, this factor is not taken into account at design time, other than from experience gained on previous programs, at least not in any detail and certainly not by the individual designers. The reasons for this are typically due to the overall “titanic” complexities of this issue. Testability design, is of importance at all levels of the product design, i.e. chip, board, system, and the manufacture, installation and field service. Unfortunately, testability design is not taught to any detail in the educational establishments, and the need for “suitable” levels of testability is not often appreciated There are still many misunderstandings as to the capabilities of the various test methods and their likely impact upon the overall economics of product manufacture and maintenance previous work has demonstrated that the effective selection of testability methods can seriously reduce the cost of manufacturing test for chips, boards and systems. Some work has also been done to analyze aspects of field service of a particular type of consumer product. In this paper we present a new approach for determining the optimum testability for systems with a long lifetime, opening a path towards effective cost savings for tailor-made systems View full abstract»

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  • Cost benefits for the application of COTS ATE

    Page(s): 433 - 438
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    This paper will discuss the outcomes of a study into the cost effectiveness of using COTS ATE for military equipment programs. An analysis of likely knock-on effects of the technology choice will also be discussed View full abstract»

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  • Selecting the right high-density VXI switching product [for ATE]

    Page(s): 313 - 319
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    Test requirements continually increase the demands on switching products in automatic test equipment (ATE). Test systems for today's semiconductor, medical, telecommunications defense, and automotive products require large numbers of switch channels with a wide variety of power handling and bandwidth requirements. At the same time switching products must fit within the test budget. By knowing what to look for, the test engineer can select a switch product that is cost-effective, not only at purchase time, but over the life of the test system View full abstract»

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  • PXI and VXI modular instrumentation in the new millennium

    Page(s): 623 - 625
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    Instrumentation has evolved in many ways over the past several decades. Standards such as GPIB and VXI made open, multi-vendor test systems possible and personal computer technology stretched overall capabilities and ease-of-use. Test technology for the new millennium now includes CompactPCI with PXI extensions. PXI directly couples PC technology with traditional instrument capabilities found in VXI to result in broader measurement and automation capabilities. Advanced measurement technology combined with the fast processing capabilities of today's PCs result in performance gains of more than 10X when comparing PXI to older architectures. As PXI continues to grow, it is important to understand its relationship to VXI. A solid understanding of both architectures will help test engineers in the new millennium to properly configure systems using PXI, VXI, or both View full abstract»

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  • PC-based test systems in harsh environment

    Page(s): 581 - 585
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    PC based test systems are typically used in office and laboratory environments. Some systems can also be used in industrial environments where electrical noise, higher temperature, and dust prevent the use of the desktop PC. These test systems however will not survive the harsh environment found on the flight-line or otherwise outdoor use. Such harsh environment conditions include extreme ambient temperature, dust salt-fog humidity, EMI, rain, and the shock and vibration associated with portable or transportable systems. Until recently, test, data acquisition, and process control applications that had to meet such harsh environments had to be custom-designed. Some applications used a modified VXI chassis and some used custom electronics; these solutions were in most cases too costly and required an extensive development program prior to deployment. In other cases, the solutions were a result of numerous compromises that mitigated the original design goals to a point where the system became unusable. The question whether a PC-based system can be used at all in such environments has been asked numerous times with the answer being NO. However, following strict guidelines, a COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf) PC can be (and is being) used in the harshest environments. This paper discusses the problems associated with test equipment for harsh environments and demonstrates that the PC is a viable low-cost option for such applications View full abstract»

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  • Improved aircraft readiness through COTS

    Page(s): 451 - 456
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    This paper details research performed in the development of COTS based test program sets capable of testing various avionics systems installed in operational aircraft. The basis of this program was to determine the best course of action to allow the aircraft technician to troubleshoot and verify faults encountered during normal operation. This was accomplished by first developing an expert knowledge database covering problems and faults encountered by experienced aircraft technicians. The test system, dubbed the Avionics Test System (ATS), allows end-to-end performance testing of any avionics system from the installed antenna to the operator interface, visual or aural. The ATS gives the aircraft technician the ability to test the functions of the avionics systems using real-world performance criteria. The ATS end-to-end test capability tests all segments of the avionics systems giving a positive indication of faults in a real-world environment. With a graphical user interface, the technician's inputs are button presses vs. keystrokes allowing for incremental environment use. A wireless remote control capability provides the technician the ability to perform the majority of tests while seated in the cockpit or at a user station View full abstract»

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  • An agent based measurement laboratory over Internet

    Page(s): 61 - 66
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    This paper introduces AgentLab, a distributed laboratory over Internet based on Java and mobile agents. Java ensures portability of measurement software, facilitates interoperability with existing I/O drivers and makes if possible to use mobile agents as the building blocks in-the-large. A measurement test is assembled as a collection of actors plus a runtime support, and is mapped onto a mobile agent. The set of the available test methods are kept in an object space. A measurement test is selected, configured, uploaded and launched by the end-user through a combination of Web and Java graphical user interface. The paper describes the AgentLab architecture and reports about its current implementation status View full abstract»

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  • Migration of legacy test programs to a modern computer platform [for avionics testing]

    Page(s): 293 - 298
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    Boeing, like many companies, was faced with solving test station obsolescence to preserve the investment of over two hundred fifty test programs for in-house manufacturing as well as airline customer support. Boeing needed to update the computer on a 1980s vintage Hewlett-Packard (HP) 1000 computer-based ATE. A SUN SPARC Ultra 30 computer was selected to replace this out of production HP computer. The increased processing speed that was provided by this newer computer had the potential to impact the investment of test programs. A goal was established to not change the test programs or to at least minimize the required changes due to the potential cost. Preserving these test programs written in BASIC, FORTRAN and ATLAS 616 was a significant technical challenge. This paper discusses the innovations and ultimate solutions to minimizing test program changes required by the computer upgrade. It discusses timing issues created by the upgrade and how a balance was made between keeping TPS changes to a minimum while taking advantage of the increased processing speed in compiling and executing the test programs. It also addresses some of the enhancements requiring test software modifications that were determined to add significant value to the automated test system View full abstract»

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  • Applying VXI technology to DC power supply programming resistors

    Page(s): 109 - 110
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    The legacy F-16 Analog Tester utilised resistor programmable DC power supplies for application of programmable stimulus. Resistor programmable power supplies, although still available in today's market, are becoming a rarity. The F-16 Analog Test Station Sustainment (FATSS) team decided up front to eliminate reliance on the availability of such devices, and engineer a means to convert the existing resistances to an analog voltage, more compatible with modern power supply programming options View full abstract»

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  • Weapon interface simulation

    Page(s): 593 - 597
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    Weapon interface simulation is a viable test approach that increases aircraft and crew war readiness. Guided missile Built-in-Test (BIT) checks use test equipment that performs the same BIT cycle initiated during tactical use by the launch aircraft. Although this is a commonly accepted test approach for monitions within the MIL-STD-1760 family, the various aircraft that support the MIL-STD-1760 interface are not tested in the same manner. Day-to-day verification of the aircraft weapons capability relies on BIT checks of the individual avionics units. These BIT checks verify the overall functionality of each Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) but do not provide an integrated test of specific weapon interface functions. Consequently BIT checks are supplemented with periodic functional testing performed directly at the aircraft to missile interface and consist of static checks of power forms and discrete signals, as well as limited transfers of information over the serial data interface. Aircraft testing in this manner inadequately exercises integrated avionics functions that support missile initialization, target queuing, and missile release. The result is reduced aircraft weapons readiness and reliability. Testing of the aircraft weapon interface by dynamically simulating the missile interface and exercising the aircraft from within tactical modes provides optimal test thoroughness and the best maximum achievable war readiness View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent engineering for automatic test station development

    Page(s): 121 - 124
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    During the planning stage for development of a new test station or upgrade, one becomes very aware that there are many tasks to accomplish in a short period of time. It is often important to maintain a short development cycle while accomplishing both hardware and software tasks such as hardware selection and driver development. Concurrent engineering allows for a simultaneous activity of hardware and software personnel during test station development. This paper will discuss the application of concurrent engineering during development of the F-16 Analog Test Station Sustainment (FATSS) project and how these principles can easily be applied to other development efforts View full abstract»

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  • US Navy standard missile “COTS” expert solution!

    Page(s): 587 - 592
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    This presentation details how the US Navy and it's contractor WDT&A partnered and is building a series of intelligent electronic support tools for missile hardware, production, depot and Intermediate Level test equipment. The missile manufacturer, Raytheon Missile Systems Company is expected to join in the project later this year, (1999). By adopting and using a third-party COTS expert system development environment, the STANDARD Missile Program is capturing expert knowledge much more efficiently, fielding runtimes sooner and saving money, over previous "built all in-house" approaches View full abstract»

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  • Using COTS instruments to produce virtual functions previously supplied by specialised equipment

    Page(s): 269 - 272
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    A key part of a tester design is that of overall cost. Historically equipment has had to be fitted to a system when it may only be required for a single function or for a single LRI. This paper looks at ways in which a tester without the need to fit LRI specific equipment can supply complex functions View full abstract»

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  • Structured architecture for test systems (SATS) hardware interface standards

    Page(s): 707 - 718
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    The Structured Architecture Test System (SATS) is the culmination of several years of study to define a more structured approach to integrating VXI, PXI VME, IEC, RFI subset standards into a cohesive system solution. This is done primarily to preserve test program rehostability, equipment reconfigurability, and technology evolution requirements. It further reduces customization/augmentation, test program development, and interface costs, while increasing competition. Fundamental design is being developed through industry participation to assure product viability and long-term commitments to the standard. VXI Associates with government support will assist in completing the necessary coordination, funding, and standard's process. The program is actively seeking instrument suppliers to develop modules meeting the standard View full abstract»

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  • Coding and on-line transmitting system for medical research

    Page(s): 73 - 77
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    A distributed data acquisition system is proposed. It provides parallel and simultaneous coding and on-line transmission of signals. This system has high accuracy of measurements and performance in sampling and transmission comparing with known analogs View full abstract»

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  • Analog-digital systems descriptions for signal processing and control application

    Page(s): 229 - 233
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    The paper deals with two comparatively simple but common approaches to deal with real analog-digital systems. First description contents: decomposition of the static input-output characteristic, which is used to get properties for a wide class of nonlinearities and it allows to calculate the output signal for any input signal; to deal with dynamics, coefficients of differential equation are used. As a result, the behaviour of the of the object, which contents nonlinear statical part and linear dynamic part can be described with a small set of parameters only and each of them can be estimated experimentally. Second description is based on linear inertial stochastic for model, which takes account of nonlinear and inertial conversion effect by introducing equivalent noise. This makes if possible to remain within the class of linear operators in normalizing the total dynamic responses to allow for nonlinear properties of ADS. The simulation and experimental results confirmed the usefulness of the both kind of descriptions utilizing the same coefficients of differential equation estimated experimentally View full abstract»

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  • A hysteresis model for magnetic materials using the Giles-Atherton model

    Page(s): 803 - 808
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    The problem of determining parameters of the Giles-Atherton model used for defining hysteresis curves of magnetic materials was analyzed. Results obtained by numerical simulation of hysteresis curves of the ferromagnetic, hard magnetic core and anisotropic materials have been given. The hysteresis curve obtained is in good agreement with the curve defined for these materials in the PSpice program packet. The proposed method for parameter determination enables simulation of any magnetic material, which has a characteristic R, Z or F-shaped hysteresis curve View full abstract»

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  • Specifying an IVI class for digital test instrumentation

    Page(s): 741 - 745
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    This paper presents an overview of the work being done by Teradyne in conjunction with the IVI Foundation to specify an IVI class for digital instrumentation. The interchangeable Virtual Instruments (IVI) Foundation was formed in August of 1997 to define standard specifications for programming common test instrument capabilities. The paper presents the major architectural aspects of digital test instrumentation, and how those features can be grouped into classes for the purpose of writing an instrument independent driver. Topics discussed include derivation of capability classes, class extensions, simulation, and range checking. Examples of how the IVI digital class would apply to the Teradyne MS-Series Digital Test Instrument are included. Conclusions summarize the unique attributes of digital test instrumentation, the benefits which can be achieved through standardization, and the tradeoffs associated with utilizing class extensions View full abstract»

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  • Electrocontact microdisplacement testing subsystem

    Page(s): 373 - 376
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    The subsystem relates to control, testing and measurement instrumentation with closed digital control loop structure. It may be used for testing and measurement of smooth displacements resulting from, for example, force or temperature deformation of an object, or for detection of charges in geometric dimensions of an object while monitoring its airtightness; in particular, when monitoring airtightness of integral microcircuits in cremate packages and watertightness of integral circuits in a watertight case. Also it may be used with some additions for tactile sensing in robotic systems View full abstract»

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  • A hidden Markov model based algorithm for online fault diagnosis with partial and imperfect tests

    Page(s): 355 - 366
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    In this paper, we present a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based algorithm for online fault diagnosis in complex large-scale systems with partial and imperfect tests. The HMM-based algorithm handles test uncertainties and inaccuracies, finds the best estimate of system states and identifies the dynamic changes in system states, such as from a fault-free state to a faulty one. We also present two methods to estimate the model parameters, namely, the state transition probabilities and the instantaneous probabilities of observed test outcomes, for adaptive fault diagnosis. In order to validate the adaptive parameter estimation techniques, we present simulation results with and without the knowledge of HMM parameters. In addition, the advantages of using the HMM approach over a Hamming-distance based fault diagnosis technique are quantified. Tradeoffs in complexity versus performance of the diagnostic algorithm are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Evolving to a single point of access automatic test systems-product group management (ATS-PGM)

    Page(s): 87 - 91
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    This paper discusses the evolution of processes involved in designing and implementing the `Single Point of Access to Mission Critical Information' for the ATS-PGM web site. The purpose is to discuss the goal of design and implementation to create a comprehensive web site that met the ATS-PGM web users' needs. We discuss our methodology that enabled the capture of information necessary to create the desired web site. We identify the process that resulted in strategies and brainstorming techniques that were necessary for capturing requirements and planning specific goals the web site needed to accomplish. Finally, we present an examination of the level of repeatable, managed or optimized success of ATS-PGM according to the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) View full abstract»

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  • Using behavioral mixed-signal simulation to implement COTS rapid technology insertion in avionics systems

    Page(s): 769 - 773
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    The Department of Defense (DoD) has specific goals to reduce acquisition cost, shorten development time and allow rapid technology insertion into avionics systems. The DoD funded Boeing to perform a study on methods to accomplish these goals. The Diagnostics for Acquisition (DFA) study was broken into three efforts: simulation, demonstration, and studies. In the simulation effort, creation of functional, or behavioral, models of avionics subsystem components based on functional specifications will facilitate the use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) equipment and procedures to accomplish the DoD goals. The development of the avionics subsystem components are based on performance-based build-to specifications. For the purposes of this DFA study, the test engineers were not allowed to examine supplemental documentation or schematics from which to develop test programs View full abstract»

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