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Technology and Society in Asia (T&SA), 2012 IEEE Conference on

Date 27-29 Oct. 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 34
  • [Front cover]

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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): i
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  • [Title page]

    Page(s): ii
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  • Conference organizing committee

    Page(s): iii - iv
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  • Welcome

    Page(s): v - vii
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  • Keynote speakers

    Page(s): viii
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    These keynote speech discuss the following: reflecting on IT and the global community; The accident at TEPCO Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations and Community informatics. View full abstract»

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  • Peer-reviewed papers

    Page(s): ix - xi
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  • Review process

    Page(s): xii - xiii
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  • Using “simple” technology to support geographically distributed communities of practice

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    Communities of practice are important social structures for creating and sharing knowledge and it has been suggested that organizations should develop and support communities of practice for effective knowledge management. As a result, there is growing interest in the use of information and communication technology (ICT) to enable and support geographically dispersed communities of practice. In this paper, we report on a vibrant and productive, geographically dispersed community of practice that has spontaneously emerged over the last decade. The members of this community are computer support technicians, working within a large Australian university. Our results indicate that ICT can support a community of practice and this involves knowledge sharing as well as socialization. We describe the community, the interactions between members, the way the community is organized and managed, and the way it is enabled by ICT. View full abstract»

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  • ICT and society: Examining the impact of technology among filipino families in diaspora

    Page(s): 1 - 7
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    The role of information and communication technologies has reached all sectors of society. No doubt that the smallest unit of society, the family, has been tremendously affected by these changes. The impact of technology has been directed to the family as they consume the innovation every minute of their lives. As such, it is important to examine how communication technology has affected the quality of communications and lives of people. The study explores how communication technologies modify, alter and transform the lives of Filipino families in the context of diaspora. It aims to determine 1. information and communication and technologies commonly accessed by respondents; 2. variations in family characteristics, accessibility to new communication technologies ,and frequency of use; 3. problems encountered in the use of the new technology; 4.impact of communication technology to the transformation of Filipino families in diaspora; and 5. impact of message exchanges among family members evident in their actual living condition. The Filipino family, known for its close ties, attempts to maintain relationships by utilizing gadgets available for them. The ubiquity of new technologies has facilitated communication among family members who regard these gadgets integral to their daily lives The researcher selected families from the categories common to both Philippine Overseas Employment Agency (POEA) and National Statistics Office websites through purposive sampling. These are: 1. seafarers; 2.domestic helpers ; 3. professionals such as nurses, doctors and others; 4. laborers and helpers; 5. production/operators and other related works; 6. caregivers and caretakers; and 7. technicians to include wiremen, electrician, etc. Respondents were from the Southern Tagalog Region where Cavite, one of its provinces, has the highest number of sea-based and land-based deployment, as well as, the highest in overseas remittances. The study undertakes a quantitative-qualitative appro- ch to research. In order to have a clearer picture of these families, a multimethod approach was employed including survey, key informant, in-depth and on-line interviews. Results show that family communication is vital in the realization of aspirations within the family. Most families use mobile phones and internet to communicate with their family members anytime and anywhere. Common problems encountered relates to signal of equipment used, cost of communication thru ICT and quality of messages conveyed. Aspirations such as familial dreams, plans and goals are communicated through the use of technology despite distance. In general, results reveal that diaspora and the use of ICT facilitated the realization of aspirations of Filipino families. Both have been a persistent culture among Filipinos. View full abstract»

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  • Quantifying the environmental footprint of rigid substrate printed antenna

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    Quantifying environmental footprint is an important task for the embedded system researcher as this study keep them aware of environmental impacts' threat toward green and healthy living of human beings. In this work we have presented a study on analysis of sustainability and environmental impacts assessment in manufacturing process of rigid substrate printed antennas. Life cycle assessment approach has been employed to quantify and asses the environmental footprint. A case study has been carried out for epoxy resin substrate based tip truncated equilateral triangle microstrip antenna. The subtractive printing methodology have been conducted to trace the required antenna pattern. The output parameters have been analyzed in terms of global warming potential, ozone layer depletion potential, human toxicity and acidification potential. Gabi's balance approach has been utilized to analyze the environmental emissions to the air, fresh water, sea water, agricultural and industrial soils. The consumption of resources has also been shortly described in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • A concept development methodology: Disaster relief operations

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    The 2009 Australian Defence White Paper directs the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to support disaster relief operations undertaken by relevant agencies in Asia and, more specifically, in support of neighbouring Asia-Pacific nations. The urgency of this task is underscored both by projected increases in the frequency of natural disasters, and the likelihood of increasingly severe consequences as a result of population growth and increasing urban density along coastal zones and inland waterways. Asia is one of the world's most natural disaster-afflicted areas, and it contains some of the world's most technologically-advanced regions. The role and usage of social media and social network technologies in disaster relief activities are becoming broader and increasingly important in afflicted communities, as evidenced in the 2010 Haiti earthquake and 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami crisis. It is vital for the ADF to understand the utility of social media and social network technologies as a 'tool' to support disaster relief operations. This paper considers the conjunction of disaster relief and evolving social media and social network technologies in Asia. A conceptual framework is developed where morphological analysis and soft systems techniques are applied using an indicative example to demonstrate how the ADF might enhance its ability to respond to natural disasters in Asia through the use of social media and social network, noting this is not an articulation of official ADF policy or guidance. The framework has the potential to provide strategic direction to the ADF's force development and operational response processes. It would be beneficial for disaster relief agencies and Defence to learn and leverage from each other's complementary role. View full abstract»

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  • Norbert Wiener and Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    For seven months from late 1955, Norbert Wiener (1894-1964) worked at the Indian Statistical Institute at the invitation of Prasanta Chandra Mahalanobis (1893-1972). Mahalanobis had achieved a remarkable feat, the creation of a world class institution within a decade of India's independence. Wiener was also at the peak of his career, having established the field of cybernetics a few years earlier. These two major 20th century leaders in the application of technology shared similarities in their backgrounds, and in their approach to the social value of science and technology. For Mahalanobis, Wiener's visit was one of many which he oversaw, bringing international experts to his students and staff. For Wiener as the initiator of modern factory automation, India provided an opportunity to work on an idea important to him, alternative development models to the “smokestack industrialization” of the European industrial revolution. Both made contributions to the development of the sophisticated technology environment we see in India today. View full abstract»

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  • The implications of clean and renewable energy development for gender equality in poor communities in South Asia

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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    Historically, women have been invisible in the energy sector and energy infrastructure and services are often and incorrectly considered to be `gender neutral'. The role of women in energy development is a recent area of study that emerged in the 1980s and a substantial body of feminist research has been built up since then. With 675 million people in developing Asia having no access to electricity, the gender analyses of energy access finds that this `energy poverty' is a gender biased poverty, with poor women bearing much of the burden of limited access to electricity and modern energy services. In rural Asia women and men in poor communities continue to rely predominantly on traditional biomass, such as wood, charcoal, straw and dung, for cooking and indoor heating, which are very inefficient and a significant health risk due to indoor air pollution, especially for women and children. A key challenge is the provision of energy in an environmentally sustainable manner based on renewable energy sources and applications. It has been argued that ignoring the social context determining energy access, characterised by gender roles and traditions, can negatively affect the potential of renewable energy as a sustainable and alternative energy resource. This paper looks at the linkages between gender and clean and renewable energy. Its conclusions suggest that while there are no purely technological solutions to achieving progress on gender equality and women's empowerment, nevertheless, in the context of South Asia (and especially in rural South Asia) where women's lives are marked by gender inequalities, access to clean and renewable energy services, if also targeted at improving women's access and welfare, can catalyse economic, social and cultural processes that improve gender equality and women's empowerment. This study does not include an analysis of specific renewable energy technologies or applications. It is based on findings in existing research on the su- ject. While there is no standard definition of clean energy or technologies, for the purpose of this study clean energy can be considered to be zero or low carbon technologies that do not have significant environmental or social impact. Renewable energy can be defined as clean energy coming from naturally replenished resources, i.e. solar, geophysical or biological sources. View full abstract»

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  • Indian Millennials: Are microchip implants a more secure technology for identification and access control?

    Page(s): 1 - 9
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    This mixed methods study with a sequential explanatory strategy explored qualitatively the statistically significant quantitative findings relative to Indian respondents' perceptions about RFID (radio frequency identification) transponders implanted into the human body. In the first analysis phase of the study, there was a significant chi-square analysis reported (χ2 = 56.64, df = 3, p = .000) relative to the perception of small business owners (N = 453) that implanted chips are a more secure form of identification and/or access control in organizations and the respondents' country of residence. Countries under study included Australia, India, the UK and US. The country contributing most to this significant relationship was India. Additionally, frequency data comparing the relationship of the respondents' generation and perceptions of implants as a more secure technology (yes - no) was examined. The significant chi-square (χ2 = 29.11, df = 2, p = .000) analysis indicated that there was a very significant relationship between the respondents' opinions and such generations as Baby Boomers (those born 1946 - 1965), Generation X (those born 1966-1980) and Generation Y (those born 1981-2000). The second analysis phase of the study explored qualitative data gleaned from open-ended questions asking Indian Millennials (born 1981-2000) about their feelings about being implanted with a chip. Over one third of the world's population is considered part of the Millennial generation. Of India's 1.2 billion people, approximately half are under the age of 25; that is, over 250 million are categorized as Millennials. Based on the quantitative and qualitative findings, researchers in this study concluded that three factors affect perceptions of RFID implants. One key factor is that Indian Millennials appear to describe more feelings of positivity and neutrality when compared with the two prior generations. View full abstract»

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  • Japanese salient perceptions of ubiquitous monitoring

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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    Ubiquitous Computing systems stand to bring many benefits in life. To achieve this, such systems will require unprecedented levels of data to be collected, in real time, about users. One issue with this level of data collection is that monitoring can often cause users to change their behavior, potentially rendering the data collected inaccurate. The PSA-BI model was developed to predict the behavior/responses of users to a monitoring system based on the causal relationships between system characteristics, perceptions and behavioral intention. This paper presents a study exploring how Japanese office workers in Kyoto University perceive and react to a wearable Ubiquitous Monitoring device. View full abstract»

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  • Development approach of measurement method for Information and Communication Technology adoption level in primary and secondary school

    Page(s): 1 - 7
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    With such rapid growth of technology, the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning process at schools indicates upward trend. Nevertheless, there is still no clear indication to what extent such technology has been applied. In light of that, it is necessary to set a method capable of measuring the adoption level of ICT at schools. This measurement covers some focus areas ranging from infrastructure readiness, application, competency, utilization, etc. These four focus areas have been attached with distinct weights for this measurement. Each focus area also includes some factors. Focus area of infrastructure has some factors, including electricity, telecommunication, internet, computer hardware and multimedia. As for focus area of application it covers learning system and learning content. Meanwhile, factors for focus area of competency they include the ICT competency of school staff, teachers, principal and school administrator. Lastly, focus area of utilization embraces factors of ICT application in learning and teaching activities and school administration process and ICT based school planning and policy. The indicator variables of this measurement method is defined in 4×4 indicator matrix, vertically it shows four level adoption and horizontally it shows four focus areas. Therefore, ICT adoption level as elucidated in four focus areas for each adoption level. Every factor in each adoption level of a focus area has its own indicators, for example student-to-computer ratio (SCR) which is an indicator generally used in many countries. Measurement result from all factors will reflect the schools ICT adoption level either in emerging level, applying level, infusing level or transforming level. View full abstract»

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  • Meeting Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) needs by engineering sustainable solutions

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    The world's population has surpassed 7 billion just recently, while our natural resources are depleting at an alarming rate. On one hand, we celebrate life and on the other, we see global warming, poverty, pollution, illiteracy degrading the quality of life. Advances in technology bring out the stories of drug discovery which saves millions of lives and also the development of missiles arsenal which takes away thousands of lives. It is said that we shape our technologies; thereafter they shape us. The core purpose of new technological innovation and excellence is to benefit humanity and at the same time, it is said that the existing consumer problems cannot be solved with old technologies. Most scalable, sustainable, price-sensitive solutions need advanced and emerging, cutting-edge technologies to solve the myriad problems of Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP). In this paper, the authors have mapped the human needs as described by Maslow with the aspirations of BOP population as propounded by Prahalad and how they are inter-related. This mapping has been illustrated with few case studies, one for each level of Needs Hierarchy, which are mostly the result of a literature survey of theme papers presented during IEEE Indicon 2011 Conference having the theme `Engineering Sustainable Solutions'. These case studies elucidate how few innovations and technological solutions in rural India have been able to meet the needs of human society under BOP and make their lives better. Today technologies are not only serving the affluent needs but the basic needs of society and at every level of Needs Hierarchy. View full abstract»

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  • Scalable multiuser remote laboratories provide on-demand hands-on laboratory experience

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    Remote Triggered (RT) Laboratories have emerged as viable alternatives in developing skills to deal with physical phenomenon and instrumentation in absence of real laboratory experience. Over the past decade several RT experiments have emerged in different parts of the world including those developed under Govt. of India's National Mission on Education through ICT as part of Right to Education (RTE) Program. However, as the technology to build RT labs evolves there is a growing concern at high cost of RT labs compared to real labs. Though high end instrumentation, 24×7 access and advanced ICT features are attributed to RT labs, however, `multi-user scalability' i.e. multiple simultaneous users in large numbers is still an elusive goal for most. This may primarily be because most RT labs merely automate the traditional experimentation methodology whereas efforts are needed to evolve a technology friendly method that is amenable to multi-user scalability. This paper presents a remote triggered electronics laboratory that not only operates in a traditional one-equipment-one-user `interactive mode' but also provides large multi-user scalability through one-second-a-lab `batch mode'. Such innovations in technology are crucial to empower less privileged segments of the society through education. View full abstract»

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  • The challenges in developing a seamless model of aged and disability community care in Australia within a mixed economy of service providers

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    Community Care in Australia is provided by a range of service providers including, government agencies, not for profit agencies and for profit agencies. Such a broad range of service providers presents a significant and complex challenge in the development of common and coherent Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems. These challenges include; limited interoperability, complex and differing work practices, conflicting data and reporting requirements, lack of agreement on common work processes across the sector, lack of skills, ad-hoc ICT funding and support. The authors of this paper argue that while policy and practice development in Community Care within Australia has emphasised person centred service delivery, localism, community engagement to enhance coordination and collaboration. Unfortunately the development and implementation of effective ICT practices across the sector have not matched this policy intention. The implementation of ICT has more often than not been technologically deterministic relying on off the shelf software and technology solutions that have reinforced significant interoperability issues, inflexible work processes and practices. Future ICT implementations would be more effective if it addressed the actual needs of service users, staff and enabled policy reforms to occur. Such reforms must also be accompanied by, effective change management, training, benefits realisation and support local information requirements. View full abstract»

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  • Customer service- A tool to improve Quality of Experience (QoE)

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    For internet service providers, providing quality customer service is as important as providing promised bandwidth and consistent service availability. In Pakistan, there is fierce competition among wireless and wire-line technology ISP's. The total number of broadband users in the country has exceeded 1.7m and the industry is yet to experience the boom in full enormity. Set in this scenario, we studied the Quality of Experience (QoE) enjoyed by the customers of the first broadband company in Pakistan, Nayatel (Pvt) Ltd., that provides triple play services (i.e. phone, video and internet) to public and corporate sector in two cities. Primary data was obtained by receiving customer feedback regarding their overall experience with the company's services. Overall Mean Opinion Score for customer satisfaction with voice, video and internet services and came out to be 4.30/5. Analysis was also done on secondary data like customer support calls record, customer appreciation emails and troubleshoot time durations etc. over a 3-month time period. The analysis showed astounding results including achievement of zero seconds' minimum call wait time in the Technical Assistance Centre of the company. The results offer a proof that customer satisfaction measures have raised the bar for broadband internet service quality in Pakistan and have made customers more apt than ever before to compare, evaluate and choose products based equally on quality, price and serviceability. View full abstract»

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  • Feedback and trust-related factors of consumer behavior in cross-border electronic commerce

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    Online shopping from foreign websites, or cross-border electronic commerce, has not become very common despite its potential advantages for consumers. This study investigated the factors that influence the intention to use a foreign website, using a model of consumer behavior with trust and risk. Additionally, it examines how feedback from users of different nationalities affects the relationships between those factors. A survey was conducted in Japan, which obtained 915 responses divided into three groups, corresponding to different scenarios of feedback in the website. The results showed that in a cross-border context Trust and Risk have an influence on Intention of Use that seems to be unaffected by the presence of feedback. However, other relationships are affected by the differences in the groups, such as the influence of general trust in electronic commerce on Trust in the website which is only significant when feedback information is shown. View full abstract»

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  • Diagnosis system using data mining approach for Glaucoma (a social threat)

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    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness after cataracts and its detection is essential to prevent visual damage. Glaucoma is the third leading cause of blindness in India. The framework designed, will be able to help in early detection and diagnosis of glaucoma using perimetry data and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. The co-relation between perimetry and OCT data will be evaluated and the resultant data will be used as an input for the diagnostic system. The system will be able to identify the normal and glaucomatous eye, it will also be able to predict the progression of glaucoma. Thus, assisting ophthalmologist in earlier detection of glaucoma which will help the society in turn for fighting the silent killer of vision. View full abstract»

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  • Water, energy and food security

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    Water, energy and food are inextricably linked and underpin the development and expansionary nature of current global trade and productivity models. Global concerns about limited access to these three fundamentals for life are compounded by growing concerns about their future availability and sustainability. Adding more people to an increasingly urbanized planet will exert significant pressure on the level and complexity of trade-offs required among these three development goals; trade-offs that at the same time must act to minimize the potential to accelerate ecosystem degradation. This paper argues that realizing long-term water, energy and food security is possible; however, a “business as usual” approach cannot achieve this. A transformation in thinking and approach is necessary with the adoption of new management and development opportunities, which are enabled by innovative technology. A new approach, thinking in a Nexus perspective, is at the core to redefining our understanding of the inter-relationships between the water, energy and food security, and is a fundamental tenet to realizing the Green Economy. This paradigm shift is vital to achieving the sustainability development goals in an environment of global climate and economic change. View full abstract»

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  • Smart meter technology tradeoffs

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    Smart meters have become a matter of concern for many populations, although the technology is as always politically neutral. The focus on electricity rather than all metered services, water, gas and electricity is one aspect of this public concern. The heavy emphasis on Smart Grids, overall energy supply stability [1] and the extension of control into the home by power generators, allied to poor communications by governments and power generators in a range of countries have led to an increasingly well founded series of problems: 1. Asymmetries in power between consumer and supplier 2. Privacy issues [2, 3] 3. Data ownership issues 4. And, largely due to limited communications and thus community confidence, concerns over RF radiation effects [4]. The paper examines some of the user-side issues in context, and the imbalances between industry and consumer, how these have been addressed to date, and ways forward. View full abstract»

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