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Self-Stabilizing Systems, 1999. Proceedings. 19th IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems Workshop on

Date May 31 1999-June 4 1999

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  • Proceedings 19th IEEE International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems

    Publication Year: 1999
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Index of authors

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s): 111
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Phase synchronization on asynchronous uniform rings with odd size

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):54 - 61
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB)

    We propose a self-stabilizing phase synchronization protocol for uniform rings with odd size. The proposed protocol works in an asynchronous system and guarantees that when the system is stabilized, all phase values are never more than one apart View full abstract»

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  • Self-stabilizing max-heap

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):94 - 101
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)

    A self-stabilizing algorithm is proposed for constructing and maintaining a max-heap in a rooted tree network. The presented solution improves the design of Brian Bourgon and Ajoy K. Datta (1995) in three respects. First, our solution stabilizes in O(h) while theirs stabilizes in O(nh). Second, the additional memory needed for synchronizing nodes of the system in our design is O(1) while in theirs... View full abstract»

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  • Finite-state self-stabilizing protocols in message-passing systems

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):62 - 69
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)

    We define a finite state message passing model using guarded commands. This model is particularly appropriate for defining and reasoning about self stabilizing protocols, due to the well known result that self stabilizing protocols on unbounded-channel models must have infinitely many legitimate states. We argue that our model is more realistic than other models, and demonstrate its use with a sim... View full abstract»

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  • Self-stabilizing load distribution for replicated servers on a per-access basis

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):102 - 109
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)

    Usually, load distribution schemes for replicated servers are based on a many-to-one mapping between client and server meaning that, while a server may serve many clients, a client has a single specific server which it queries at any point in time. In some cases, however it is desirable that the number of accesses of a client may be distributed over multiple servers, thus yielding a many-to-many m... View full abstract»

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  • Self-stabilizing clock synchronization in a hierarchical network

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):86 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)

    We are aiming at introducing a solution to a consensus problem, which models the asynchronous part of a clock synchronization problem. The solution is based on the diffusion of a request from the peripheral units to the privileged units that respond with the value of a reference clock that is diffused in the opposite direction. The diffusion is controlled by a hierarchical arrangement of the units... View full abstract»

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  • Self-stabilizing census with cut-through constraint

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):70 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)

    We present a distributed census algorithm for unidirectional rings subject to transient faults. This algorithm is written using the efficient cut-through routing scheme, where the messages must be forwarded to a neighbor before they are completely received. The distributed census problem can be informally described as follows: the nodes cooperate to reach a global configuration where every node ca... View full abstract»

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  • A case-study in component-based mechanical verification of fault-tolerant programs

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)

    We present a case study to demonstrate that the decomposition of a fault tolerant program into its components is useful in its mechanical verification. More specifically we discuss our experience in using the theorem prover PVS to verify Dijkstra's token ring program in a component based manner. We also demonstrate the advantages of component based mechanical verification View full abstract»

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  • An exercise in proving convergence through transfer functions

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):41 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)

    Self-stabilizing algorithms must fulfill two requirements generally called closure and convergence. We are interested in the convergence property and discuss a new method for proving it. Usually proving the convergence of self-stabilizing algorithms requires a well foundedness argument: briefly spoken it involves exhibiting a convergence function which is shown to decrease with every transition of... View full abstract»

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  • Parallel composition of stabilizing algorithms

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):25 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)

    Worst case convergence time is primary measure of the complexity of a self-stabilizing algorithm. This aspect of complexity is not only theoretically interesting, but can be a practical limitation to stabilization's applicability in system design. Recently, a number of papers concentrated on conditional improvements in convergence time. Plausible conditions include rapid convergence for the most l... View full abstract»

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  • The alternator

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):48 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (888 KB)

    An alternator is an array of interacting processes that satisfy three conditions. First, if a process has an enabled action at some state, then no neighbor of that process has an enabled action at the same state. Second, along any concurrent execution, each action is executed infinitely often. Third, along any maximally concurrent execution, the alternator is stabilizing to states where the number... View full abstract»

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  • The FDDI MAC meets self-stabilization

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):1 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB)

    A self-stabilizing protocol is one that can continue to operate correctly after arbitrary corruption of protocol state variables and the injection of arbitrary messages. Self-stabilizing protocols are extremely robust and can be simpler than other protocols (because they use a uniform mechanism to deal with a large number of possible faults). We demonstrate these advantages by modifying the Fiber ... View full abstract»

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  • State-optimal snap-stabilizing PIF in tree networks

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):78 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)

    Introduces the notion of snap stabilization. A snap-stabilizing algorithm protocol guarantees that, starting from an arbitrary system configuration, the protocol always behaves according to its specification. So, a snap-stabilizing protocol is a self-stabilizing protocol which stabilizes in zero steps. We propose a snap-stabilizing PIF (propagation of information with feedback) scheme on a rooted ... View full abstract»

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  • Scalable self-stabilization

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):18 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)

    The paper presents a method by which an asynchronous non-reactive distributed system can stabilize from a k-faulty configuration in a time that is a monotonically increasing function of k and independent of the size of the system. In the proposed methodology processes first measure the size of the faulty regions, and then use this information to schedule actions in such a way that the faulty regio... View full abstract»

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  • Stabilization of maximal metric trees

    Publication Year: 1999, Page(s):10 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)

    We present a formal definition of routing metrics and provide the necessary and sufficient conditions for a routing metric to be optimizable along a tree. Based upon these conditions, we present a generalization of the shortest path tree which we call the “maximal metric tree”. We present a stabilizing protocol for constructing maximal metric trees. Our protocol demonstrates that the d... View full abstract»

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