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IT Professional

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2015

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): c2 - 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IT Pro 2015: A Look Ahead

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Human-Computer Interaction in Colombia: Bridging the Gap between Education and Industry

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 5 - 9
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    Human-computer interaction is one of the most promising research areas in computer science. In emergent countries like Colombia, this area is just beginning to be further developed. However, there's a gap between what is being taught in universities and what is needed in practice in software companies. Here, the authors discuss a survey they conducted in Colombia regarding HCI education versus software developer needs. View full abstract»

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  • Analytics, Machine Learning, and the Internet of Things

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 10 - 13
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    Our increasingly connected world, combined with low-cost sensors and distributed intelligence, will have a transformative impact on industry, producing more data than humans will be able to process. How will businesses adapt and evolve quickly enough to maintain their place in the competitive landscape? How will humans make sense of and benefit from these new sources of information and intelligence embedded in our environment? View full abstract»

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  • IT Security [Guest editors' introduction]

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 14 - 15
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Security--A Perpetual War: Lessons from Nature

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 16 - 22
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    For ages, people have sought inspiration in nature. Biomimicry has propelled inventions from Velcro tape to "cat's eyes" retroreflective road markers. At the same time, scientists have been developing biologically inspired techniques, including genetic algorithms and neural and sensor networks. Although a first glance shows no direct connection between the Internet's offensive and defensive techniques and patterns present in nature, closer inspection reveals many analogies between these two worlds. Botnets, distributed denial-of-service attacks, intrusion detection/prevention systems, and others techniques use strategies that closely resemble actions undertaken by certain species in the natural kingdom. The authors analyze these analogies and conclude by suggesting that the security community should turn to nature in search of new offensive and defensive techniques for virtual world security. This article is part of a special issue on IT security. View full abstract»

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  • Securing Health Information

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 23 - 29
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    Healthcare in the digital age is undergoing an IT revolution. In the US, spurred by legislation such as the Health Information Technology and Economics Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, electronic health records (EHR) adoption has dramatically increased. Meanwhile, enabled by mobile devices and ubiquitous networks, patients and physicians interact with health information in novel ways. Given health information's sensitive nature, however, a cautious approach to IT integration is warranted to ensure that patients' sensitive information is protected. Although health information security is of great interest in both academia and practice, relatively little scholarship has examined the security implications of the behavior of those who actually use IT in the healthcare sector. To stimulate this important discussion, the authors briefly describe the changing landscape of an IT-enabled healthcare ecosystem and discuss the emerging issues of mobility and security. This article is part of a special issue on IT security. View full abstract»

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  • A Right to Cybercounter Strikes: The Risks of Legalizing Hack Backs

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 30 - 35
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    The idea to legalize hacking back has gained traction in the last few years and has received several influential corporate and political proponents in the US and Europe. The growing frustration with repeated cyberattacks and a lack of effective law enforcement pushes for alternative ways to prevent future exploits. Countercyberattacks are currently illegal in most nations, because they constitute a cybercrime independent of the initial attack. Considering the legalization of cyber counterattacks raises a set of questions, including those linked to the underlying assumptions supporting the proposal to legalize countercyberattacks. Another line of questions deal with the embedded challenges to the role of the nation state. Privatized countercyberattacks could jeopardize the authority and legitimacy of the state. The combined questions raised by hacking back undermines the viability of the action itself, so hacking back is likely to be ineffective and to have a negative impact on the development of Internet governance and norms. This article is part of a special issue on IT security. View full abstract»

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  • Protected Web Components: Hiding Sensitive Information in the Shadows

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 36 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2421 KB)  

    Most modern Web applications depend on the integration of code from third-party providers, such as JavaScript libraries and advertisements. Because the included code runs within the page's security context, it represents an attractive attack target, allowing the compromise of numerous Web applications through a single attack vector (such as a malicious advertisement). Such opportunistic attackers aim to execute low-profile, nontargeted, widely applicable data-gathering attacks, such as the silent extraction of user-specific data and authentication credentials. In this article, the authors show that third-party code inclusion is rampant, even in privacy-sensitive applications such as online password managers, thereby potentially exposing the user's most sensitive data to attackers. They propose protected Web components, which leverage the newly proposed Web components, repurposing them to protect private data against opportunistic attacks, by hiding static data in the Document Object Model (DOM) and isolating sensitive interactive elements within a component. This article is part of a special issue on IT security. View full abstract»

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  • Understanding Green Software Development: A Conceptual Framework

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 44 - 50
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    The energy efficiency of IT has become one of the hottest topics in the last few years. The problem has been typically addressed by hardware manufacturers and designers, but recently the attention of industry and academia has shifted to the role of software for IT sustainability. Writing energy-efficient software is one of the most challenging issues in this area, because it requires not only a change of mindset for software developers and designers but also models and tools to measure and reduce the effect of software on the energy consumption of the underlying hardware. In this article, the authors present a conceptual framework that provides a unifying view of the strategies, models, and tools available so far for designing and developing greener software. View full abstract»

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  • An Interoperability Solution for Legacy Healthcare Devices

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 51 - 57
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    The exchange of vital sign data between legacy healthcare devices and application hosting devices requires interoperability and has become a critical issue for telecare monitoring systems. This study proposes an ISO/IEEE 11073 personal health device (x73-PHD) system that enables legacy healthcare devices to transmit vital sign data to an application-hosting device on a network. The proposed architecture is composed of the x73-PHD gateway, x73-PHD adapter, and legacy healthcare devices. Using a firmware upgrade mechanism provided by the system, the adapter connects legacy healthcare devices to transmit vital sign data to the application-hosting device, based on international x73-PHD standards and the interoperable platform. The proposed solution overcomes the problems of existing legacy healthcare device support and interoperability for personal healthcare systems. This system will enable legacy healthcare devices to link with a standard platform and supports telecare promotion. View full abstract»

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  • High Tech, High Sec.: Security Concerns in Graph Databases

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 58 - 61
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    Graph databases are a relatively new database technology gaining popularity. This article explores the value of graph databases and probes some of their security and privacy implications. View full abstract»

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  • Grace Hopper: Compilers and Cobol

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): 62 - 64
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    This sketch of Grace Murray Hopper, the first famous female computer scientist, focuses on her early programming days, creation of the first compiler, leadership in creating the Cobol language, and latter-day speaking career. It also highlights the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference, which, since 1994, has brought together an increasing number of women (and now men) to address the disappointing gender imbalance in IT professions. View full abstract»

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  • [Masthead]

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): c3
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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 2015 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
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