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Human-Robot Interaction (HRI), 2007 2nd ACM/IEEE International Conference on

Date 9-11 March 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 50
  • [Title pages]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): i - x
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  • Effects of anticipatory action on human-robot teamwork: Efficiency, fluency, and perception of team

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (594 KB)  

    A crucial skill for fluent action meshing in human team activity is a learned and calculated selection of anticipatory actions. We believe that the same holds for robotic team-mates, if they are to perform in a similarly fluent manner with their human counterparts. In this work, we propose an adaptive action selection mechanism for a robotic teammate, making anticipatory decisions based on the con... View full abstract»

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  • Human control for cooperating robot teams

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 9 - 16
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    Human control of multiple robots has been characterized by the average demand of single robots on human attention or the distribution of demands from multiple robots. When robots are allowed to cooperate autonomously, however, demands on the operator should be reduced by the amount previously required to coordinate their actions. The present experiment compares control of small robot teams in whic... View full abstract»

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  • Natural person-following behavior for social robots

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (641 KB)  

    We are developing robots with socially appropriate spatial skills not only to travel around or near people, but also to accompany people side-by-side. As a step toward this goal, we are investigating the social perceptions of a robot's movement as it follows behind a person. This paper discusses our laser-based person-tracking method and two different approaches to person-following: direction-foll... View full abstract»

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  • Managing autonomy in robot teams: Observations from four experiments

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 25 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)  

    It is often desirable for a human to manage multiple robots. Autonomy is required to keep workload within tolerable ranges, and dynamically adapting the type of autonomy may be useful for responding to environment and workload changes. We identify two management styles for managing multiple robots and present results from four experiments that have relevance to dynamic autonomy within these two ma... View full abstract»

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  • Developing performance metrics for the supervisory control of multiple robots

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB)  

    Efforts are underway to make it possible for a single operator to effectively control multiple robots. In these high workload situations, many questions arise including how many robots should be in the team (Fan-out), what level of autonomy should the robots have, and when should this level of autonomy change (i.e., dynamic autonomy). We propose that a set of metric classes should be identified th... View full abstract»

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  • Adapting GOMS to model human-robot interaction

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 41 - 48
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    A formal interaction modeling technique known as Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules (GOMS) is well-established in human-computer interaction as a cost-effective way of evaluating designs without the participation of end users. This paper explores the use of GOMS for evaluating human-robot interaction. We provide a case study in the urban search-and-rescue domain and raise issues for de... View full abstract»

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  • Interactive robot task training through dialog and demonstration

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 49 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1691 KB)  

    Effective human/robot interfaces which mimic how humans interact with one another could ultimately lead to robots being accepted in a wider domain of applications. We present a framework for interactive task training of a mobile robot where the robot learns how to do various tasks while observing a human. In addition to observation, the robot listens to the human's speech and interprets the speech... View full abstract»

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  • Learning by demonstration with critique from a human teacher

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 57 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1081 KB)  

    Learning by demonstration can be a powerful and natural tool for developing robot control policies. That is, instead of tedious hand-coding, a robot may learn a control policy by interacting with a teacher. In this work we present an algorithm for learning by demonstration in which the teacher operates in two phases. The teacher first demonstrates the task to the learner. The teacher next critique... View full abstract»

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  • Efficient model learning for dialog management

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 65 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1217 KB)  

    Intelligent planning algorithms such as the Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) have succeeded in dialog management applications [10, 11, 12] because they are robust to the inherent uncertainty of human interaction. Like all dialog planning systems, however, POMDPs require an accurate model of the user (e.g., what the user might say or want). POMDPs are generally specified using a... View full abstract»

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  • Using vision, acoustics, and natural language for disambiguation

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 73 - 80
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (839 KB)  

    Creating a human-robot interface is a daunting experience. Capabilities and functionalities of the interface are dependent on the robustness of many different sensor and input modalities. For example, object recognition poses problems for state-of-the-art vision systems. Speech recognition in noisy environments remains problematic for acoustic systems. Natural language understanding and dialog are... View full abstract»

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  • To kill a mockingbird robot

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 81 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (889 KB)  

    Robots are being introduced in our society but their social status is still unclear. A critical issue is if the robot's exhibition of intelligent life-like behavior leads to the users' perception of animacy. The ultimate test for the life-likeness of a robot is to kill it. We therefore conducted an experiment in which the robot's intelligence and the participants' gender were the independent varia... View full abstract»

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  • A dancing robot for rhythmic social interaction

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 89 - 96
    Cited by:  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1205 KB)  

    This paper describes a robotic system that uses dance as a form of social interaction to explore the properties and importance of rhythmic movement in general social interaction. The system consists of a small creature-like robot whose movement is controlled by a rhythm-based software system. Environmental rhythms can be extracted from auditory or visual sensory stimuli, and the robot synchronizes... View full abstract»

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  • The interactive robotic percussionist - new developments in form, mechanics, perception and interaction design

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 97 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1142 KB)  

    We present new developments in the improvisational robotic percussionist project, aimed at improving human-robot interaction through design, mechanics, and perceptual modeling. Our robot, named Haile, listens to live human players, analyzes perceptual aspects in their playing in real-time, and uses the product of this analysis to play along in a collaborative and improvisatory manner. It is design... View full abstract»

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  • Using proprioceptive sensors for categorizing human-robot interactions

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 105 - 112
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1420 KB)  

    Increasingly researchers are looking outside of normal communication channels (such as video and audio) to provide additional forms of communication or interaction between a human and a robot, or a robot and its environment. Amongst the new channels being investigated is the detection of touch using infrared, proprioceptive and temperature sensors. Our work aims at developing a system that can det... View full abstract»

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  • Improving human-robot interaction through adaptation to the auditory scene

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 113 - 120
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1400 KB)  

    Effective communication with a mobile robot using speech is a difficult problem even when you can control the auditory scene. Robot ego-noise, echoes, and human interference are all common sources of decreased intelligibility. In real-world environments, however, these common problems are supplemented with many different types of background noise sources. For instance, military scenarios might be ... View full abstract»

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  • Group attention control for communication robots with Wizard of OZ approach

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 121 - 128
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1736 KB)  

    This paper describes a group attention control (GAC) system that enables a communication robot to simultaneously interact with many people. GAC is based on controlling social situations and indicating explicit control to unify all purposes of attention. We implemented a semi-autonomous GAC system into a communication robot that guides visitors to exhibits in a science museum and engages in free-pl... View full abstract»

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  • How robotic products become social products: An ethnographic study of cleaning in the home

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 129 - 136
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (534 KB)  

    Robots that work with people foster social relationships between people and systems. The home is an interesting place to study the adoption and use of these systems. The home provides challenges from both technical and interaction perspectives. In addition, the home is a seat for many specialized human behaviors and needs, and has a long history of what is collected and used to functionally, aesth... View full abstract»

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  • Humanoid robots as a passive-social medium - a field experiment at a train station

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 137 - 144
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1709 KB)  

    This paper reports a method that uses humanoid robots as a communication medium. There are many interactive robots under development, but due to their limited perception, their interactivity is still far poorer than that of humans. Our approach in this paper is to limit robots' purpose to a non-interactive medium and to look for a way to attract people's interest in the information that robots con... View full abstract»

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  • Comparing a computer agent with a humanoid robot

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 145 - 152
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (993 KB)  

    HRI researchers interested in social robots have made large investments in humanoid robots. There is still sparse evidence that peoples' responses to robots differ from their responses to computer agents, suggesting that agent studies might serve to test HRI hypotheses. To help us understand the difference between people's social interactions with an agent and a robot, we experimentally compared p... View full abstract»

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  • Experiments with a robotic computer: Body, affect and cognition interactions

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 153 - 160
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (902 KB)  

    We present RoCo, the first robotic computer designed with the ability to move its monitor in subtly expressive ways that respond to and encourage its user's own postural movement. We use RoCo in a novel user study to explore whether a computer's “posture” can influence its user's subsequent posture, and if the interaction of the user's body state with their affective state during a t... View full abstract»

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  • RSVP: An investigation of remote shared visual presence as common ground for human-robot teams

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 161 - 168
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (821 KB)  

    This study presents mobile robots as a way of augmenting communication in distributed teams through a remote shared visual presence (RSVP) consisting of the robot's view. By giving all team members access to the shared visual display provided by a robot situated in a remote workspace, the robot can serve as a source of common ground for the distributed team. In a field study examining the effects ... View full abstract»

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  • A field experiment of autonomous mobility: Operator workload for one and two robots

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 169 - 176
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB)  

    An experiment was conducted on aspects of human-robot interaction in a field environment using the U.S. Army's Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV). Goals of this experiment were to examine the use of scalable interfaces and to examine operator span of control when controlling one versus two autonomous unmanned ground vehicles. We collected workload ratings from two Soldiers after they had performe... View full abstract»

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  • HRI caught on film

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 177 - 183
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    The Human Robot Interaction 2007 conference hosted a video session, in which movies of interesting, important, illustrative, or humorous HRI research moments are shown. This paper summarizes the abstracts of the presented videos. Robots and humans do not always behave as expected and the results can be entertaining and even enlightening - therefore instances of failures have also been considered i... View full abstract»

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  • A cognitive robotics approach to comprehending human language and behaviors

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 185 - 192
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (665 KB)  

    The ADAPT project is a collaboration of researchers in linguistics, robotics and artificial intelligence at three universities. We are building a complete robotic cognitive architecture for a mobile robot designed to interact with humans in a range of environments, and which uses natural language and models human behavior. This paper concentrates on the HRI aspects of ADAPT, and especially on how ... View full abstract»

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