By Topic

Bioengineering Conference (NEBEC), 2012 38th Annual Northeast

Date 16-18 March 2012

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 223
  • Welcome

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (58 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • CD: Sponsors

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Schedule of events]

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (90 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Conference committee

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Formal and de facto standards and guidelines for personal health records (PHRs)

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (326 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The objective of this research is to canvas the landscape of existing standards and guidelines relating to electronic personal health records (PHRs). Here, we propose a consensus standard for PHRs consisting of 14 data components, 11 of which should be essential for all PHRs and 3 additional recommended data components, as well as 4 key features. Through a survey of existing commercially PHR vendors, we observe a low level of adoption of existing standards. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Assessing traumatic brain injuries using EEG power spectral analysis and instantaneous phase

    Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) occurs commonly, little is known about how multiple mTBI incidents accumulate over time to produce serious morbidity or how the extent of injury can be quantified. This work presents a rat model that combines deceleration-induced brain trauma with an implantable EEG system for recording injury-induced changes in brain activity. Specifically, we present an analysis method to assess and quantify mTBI by combining information derived from EEG power spectral analysis and EEG phase shifts. We found that in different frequency bands, the correlation coefficient before the crash was notably different from the same coefficient after the crash. This study shows that EEG analysis can be used as a tool to identify and assess brain related injuries. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fabrication of silicon nanowires field effect transistors for biosensor applications

    Page(s): 5 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (218 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We use microelectronic techniques to fabricate silicon nanowires field effect transistors (SiNWs-FET). The source-drain current versus the voltage curve shows that the contact pad and the silicon nanowire form an ohmic contact. 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) is used as interfacing molecules, and assembly of these molecules is essential in surface modification technologies. Then we modified biotin on SiNWs-FET to detect streptavidin. For SiNWs-FET, variation in molecular charge is reflected in a change in the wire current. The response of the drain-source current of biotin-modified SiNWs-FET to changes in streptavidin concentration was measured by using a lock-in technique. Control experiment was carried out before biotin modified, and the SiNWs-FET did not exhibit a current change when 10-7 M streptavidin passed through the microfluidic channel. This demonstrates that the APTES does not react to streptavidin. And in the present concentration-dependent real-time measurement of biotin modified SiNWs-FET, the detection limit of streptavidin is 10-8 M. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Relevance of PDMS processing techniques used in electricity generating muscle energy converter

    Page(s): 7 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (171 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper details the feasibility of using dielectric elastomer generators to generate an electric charge between electrodes. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples underwent tensile tests to prove that dielectric elastomers strain over one hundred percent under mechanical stress two sets of differently processed. Mechanical strain on the different PDMS samples showed that dielectric elastomers could generate enough energy to power an electrical muscle energy converter (eMEC) for chronic circulatory assist. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Home healthcare devices: Towards a scalable, portable, accurate, and affordable data acquisition instrument

    Page(s): 9 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (214 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the design, development, and testing of a compact multi-channel data acquisition instrument capable of performing human body measurement and processing. The cost of the proposed Multi-channel Analog Signal Acquisition (MASA) instrument is a fraction of that of the data acquisition system used with current digital stethoscopes. It allows for the sampling of up to 32 heterogeneous signals with a single high speed Analog to digital Converter taking into account the performance as well. Heterogeneous sampling rates are identified for each channel, and optimized for best data quality with minimal storage requirement. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The effects of functionally graded structures on contact stress distributions in metal hip joints

    Page(s): 11 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (325 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper uses a finite element analysis (FEA) model to explore the effects of a cellular graded structure on contact stresses occurring on a point loaded spherical geometry similar to that found in a total hip arthroplasty (THA). The results of this study suggest that the application of a cellular structure similar to that naturally occurring in bone significantly reduces maximum shear and Von Mises stresses at the contact site. In addition to reducing stress, the use of a graded cellular structure influences the distribution of stress by moving the peak stress closer to the surface of the geometry in contrast to a solid geometry. Although this paper is preliminary, it suggests a possible method whereby longevity of an implant can be improved through the use of a cellular structure by reducing and redistributing contact stresses. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Instrumentation to study the influence of attention on disparity vergence: Design of novel central and peripheral stimuli

    Page(s): 13 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The study of saccades (side to side eye movements) with various types of visual fields or distracters has lead to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of attention. Yet, virtually no research exists on how the influence of attention modulates the neural control of disparity vergence, the inward or outward turning of the eyes to view targets in depth. Within our activities of daily living, we use a combination of eye movements including vergence and saccades to acquire visual information. This investigation describes instrumentation to systematically study the influence of attention on disparity vergence. Disparity vergence can be modeled as a preprogrammed coupled with a feedback component describing the system's speed and accuracy respectively. Hence, two types of central stimuli were generated: a step stimulus which predominantly evokes the preprogrammed component during the transient portion of the movement and a ramp stimulus to study changes within the feedback component. To stimulate only disparity while keeping accommodation constant, the system was designed using a haploscope configuration. Four types of periphery stimuli were generated that vary the amount and type of distracters. The influence of attention, or the effect of the peripheral stimulation, will be assessed by quantifying peak velocities and error defined as the difference between the stimulus and vergence eye movement response. Preliminary results show that central and peripheral visual stimuli can be programmed independently and this system can be utilized to systematically study the influence of different types of distracters on disparity vergence responses. Future directions include further data collection and analysis in healthy control and those from neurological dysfunctional populations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A brain-computer interface for robot navigation

    Page(s): 15 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (259 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) system has been developed for a user to navigate a robot via “thinking”. The user's intent was extracted from the P300 response of the recorded EEG signals using the BCI2000 platform. This paper describes the design, development and testing of this new application: to remotely control the motion of a robot using EEG (electroencephalogram) data collected during real-time trials. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Non-invasive Compartment Syndrome diagnosis

    Page(s): 17 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Compartment Syndrome causes permanent damage to patients who are undiagnosed for more than four hours. Every day, doctors miss the cardinal signs of Compartment Syndrome development after trauma. The lack of an accurate and non-invasive clinical standard for the diagnosis of Compartment Syndrome has led to thousands of amputations and permanent nerve and tissue damage. Our goal was to improve the current gold standard by designing a non-invasive device to quantitatively measure the intercompartmental pressures of the lower leg, the most commonly effected area for patients. For the Kommodo Care system, we used pressure sensors and Wheatstone Bridge strain sensors along a Master Lock 3060DAT strap. SolidWorks 2009 was used for prototype design; the strap is wrapped around the leg to measure intercompartmental pressure at the different compartment locations of the lower leg. The sensor data is sent via a laptop and compiled in MATLAB 2011. Air muscles were bundled to simulate lower leg compartments in testing the efficacy of Kommodo Care. Ultimately, our Kommodo Care system will vastly improve both diagnosis and overall patient care for Compartment Syndrome. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Amplitude modulation detection patterns of the Budgerigar

    Page(s): 19 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (221 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In determining the Amplitude Modulation Detection thresholds of the English Budgerigar, several stimuli were used. Amplitude modulation (AM) is the time variation of a sound signal's amplitude2. Using tone and noise carrier waveforms, MATLAB computed both AM and un-modulated stimuli; these signals were played through a speaker for the English Budgerigar. The bird discriminated between the modulated and un-modulated tones. Results show that this species of bird shows similar detection patterns as human beings. Based on the correlations between the bird and human data, the auditory system of the Budgerigar may possibly serve as a model for the human auditory system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Diffusion tensor tractography in pediatric spinal cord

    Page(s): 21 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (334 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Generation of spinal cord tracts from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the pediatric spinal cord can be extremely beneficial to visualize the connectivity of nerve fibers, to reveal patterns of overall diffusivity and anisotrophy of the fibers, overall architectural features, and integrity of the spinal cord. Twenty pediatric subjects were scanned: ten controls without evidence of spinal cord pathology and ten patients with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) were scanned using a newly developed reduced field of view (FoV) DTI method on a 3T scanner. After motion correction, tractography images were generated based on Fiber Assignment by Continuous Tracking (FACT) algorithm. Various DTI indices as well as tract specific information were calculated using regions of interest manually drawn at every axial slice location along the cervical spinal cord. Results showed average values of FA=0.60±0.13, MD=0.74±0.18×10-3 mm2/s in normal subjects and FA=0.45±0.14, MD=0.77±0.24×10-3 mm2/s in SCI patients. In conclusion, this study showed that tractography images can be successfully generated from pediatric spinal cord DTI data and various DTI parameters can be reliably estimated. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Force clamp and electrical stimulation on decapod appendages

    Page(s): 23 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (305 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The musculature of the decapods allows for a wide variety of motion given the limited degrees of freedom of motion granted. This study focuses on a single degree of motion of a single leg segment of the crab (Menippe mercenaria) in response to electrical stimulation. A microprocessor was programmed to trigger an electrical stimulator and to provide force and length controls of the induced contraction. Digital feedback control algorithms were implemented on the microprocessor in conjunction with the Aurora Dual Mode Lever System to provide force clamp, length clamp, as well as other loading conditions. The resulting experiment setting provides a useful platform for studying the mechanics of muscle contractions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An fMRI investigation of a memory guided vergence task: Insights to the parahippocampal area

    Page(s): 25 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (302 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This investigation sought to systematic study the parahippocampal area using three types of vergence eye movement tasks that utilized different demands on visual memory. The percent volume change of the functional activity in the posterior parahippocampal area (PPHA) was quantified for three different experimental paradigms that stimulated vergence eye movements: random tracking versus fixation; predictable tracking versus random tracking; and memory-guided task. A general linear model (GLM) was used to determine functional activity for each of the three vergence experiments. The average signal percent change for both the PPHA and frontal eye fields (FEF) was compared for each vergence task. Significant percent change in the average signal from the voxels in the PPHA was observed for all experiments (p <; 0.005), whereas no such significant change was observed for the FEF (p >; 0.06). Lastly, percent volume change was also quantified for the PPHA among experiments. Percent volume change in the PPHA was greater for the memory-guided vergence task and the change was significant across all the experiments, (p<;0.02). This suggests that when utilization of working memory is required, the PPHA functions as one of the regions for a vergence eye movement dependent memory task. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Interstitial fluid flow increases invasion of ductal carcinoma in situ-like cells through PI3K-dependent mechanisms

    Page(s): 27 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The expression of ErbB2 in pre-invasive cells is a risk factor for invasion and cancer progression. At the same time, interstitial fluid flow is elevated in solid tumors and can modulate tumor cell invasion. The combined role both factors play on invasion has never been studied, especially in the context of how they influence the transition from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Using a technique to apply interstitial fluid flow to cells embedded in a matrix and then measure its effects on cell invasion, we found fluid flow increases the invasion of cells overexpressing ErbB2. This increased invasion is due to the activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK). This occurs independently of ErbB2 activation. Identifying the mechanisms involved in the progression from DCIS to IDC will provide potential targets for determining appropriate therapy for DCIS patients. This will help improve the current clinical management, decrease patient over-treatment, and prevent cancer-associated deaths. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Performance evaluation of the Activity Analyzer

    Page(s): 29 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Activity Analyzer used to monitor and encourage physical activities of older adults. The Activity Analyzer is a wearable device designed to monitor the daily activity and inactivity according to a preprogrammed time schedule. The device is also capable of playing back pre-recorded messages to encourage exercises if periods of inactivity are detected under predefined conditions. At the end of the day, the daily activity data with a time resolution of 5 minutes can be retrieved from the mobile unit via a docking station for further analysis. The study provided preliminary test results from human subjects to evaluate the performance and optimize parameters of the device. The result is useful as a guideline for a larger-scale human study to assess the effectiveness of the device in terms of improving the daily activities for older adults. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Environmental chamber for microscopic observation

    Page(s): 31 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An environmental chamber will be constructed to monitor and control factors that mimic physiologic conditions while studying live cells and tissue cultures. The chamber to be installed on different varieties of inverted microscopes and has to enclose the space around the stage for proper measurement and control. The system will monitor temperature, CO2/pH, as well as humidity in a closed feedback loop to keep the parameters nearly constant during microscopy. The control of the parameters must be effective and be constant throughout the chamber, which means good circulation and distribution of heat, humidity, and CO2. For the control and monitoring, a microprocessor based on an Arduino board was being studied to take measurements as well as initiate the feedback system to keep parameters constant. The design of the environmental chamber has been finalized and construction will begin shortly after the ordered materials arrive, and the computer interface and control will be done for the measurement of parameters and coupled with the sensors to begin testing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Body powered anthropomorphic prosthetic hand with force feedback and auto-rotation regimes

    Page(s): 33 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (327 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Currently available prosthetic hand devices suffer from lack of voluntary wrist movement or are prohibitively expensive. A prosthetic hand was designed as a potential low-cost alternative to these models. The hand incorporates a body powered shoulder harness for generating grip force and adds a motor housed in the wrist for axial rotation of the wrist, which can be manually controlled by pressure switches worn on the user's toes. Additionally, a microcontroller uses infrared signals emitted from the wrist to auto-rotate the palm towards the nearest detected object when this mode is turned on. The design represents a considerable advantage in terms of functionality and cost over available commercial models. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • P300-based brain-computer interface memory game to improve motivation and performance

    Page(s): 35 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (154 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) relies on a classifier to determine a user's intent through the EEG signals. This classifier needs to be trained with a specific user prior to its usage. Since the effectiveness of a classifier is affected by the user's motivation during training, a memory game using the BCPy2000 platform has been developed for enhancing motivation and performance in using a traditional P300-based BCI system. A pilot study showed that this memory game is accomplishable by human subjects in a BCI system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Characterization of nanoparticle distribution in microcirculation: The influence of blood cells and vascular geometry

    Page(s): 37 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper focuses on characterization of nanoparticle (NP) distribution in microcirculation. In microcirculation, the vessel size is comparable to the size of red blood cells (RBCs) and the existence of blood cells largely influences the dispersion and binding distribution of NPs. The branching geometry of these vessels leads to non-uniform binding distribution of particles. The influence of various effects such as blood cells, vessel geometry, and shear rates on NP delivery are characterized. The RBCs are found to enhance the binding of NPs at all shear rates while reduces the binding of microparticles at low shear rates. The branching geometry of the capillary vessels leads to higher particle binding density. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Designing an acoustics-powered Automated External Defibrillator battery charger

    Page(s): 39 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (147 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Technology in today's era is often favored when it offers the potential for eco-friendly or `green' alternatives for energy. Solar power, wind power and hydropower technology have already been incorporated into various applications for consumer use. Another source from which energy can be generated is sound, with the help of piezoelectrics. Piezoelectrics have been used for many years in microphones, telephones and other common devices, but only recently has the idea of energy harvesting through a piezoelectric material been utilized. The specific application of piezoelectrics in this project is to charge the Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The placement of AEDs in public locations has helped save thousands of lives each year from episodes of sudden cardiac arrest. One issue that arises, however, is the depletion in the battery charge over time, even when the AED is not used. Implementing piezoelectrics into this application can enable the AED battery to be recharged after use or after remaining on standby mode for an extended period of time, thereby increasing its overall lifespan and reducing costs of maintenance. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.