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Integrated STEM Education Conference (ISEC), 2012 IEEE 2nd

Date 9-9 March 2012

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • A robotics based design activity to teach the Doppler effect

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (191 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a STEM design activity for use by primary and secondary school teachers to effectively teach the Doppler effect to students. First, the phenomenon is presented in an intriguing way. Once the initial concept is grasped, we cover the science of what is happening by describing the concept and definition of frequency, wavelength, and velocity. Several applications are then presented as well as some supplemental concepts that may be studied in more advanced classes. Finally, the students are instructed to think creatively about how to set up an experiment that utilizes robotics technology to adequately demonstrate the fundamentals of the Doppler effect. The students are required to fulfill of several learning objectives during the design activity. The design activity was presented to several high school teachers in the Northeastern region of the United States who in turn conducted the activity in their classrooms. View full abstract»

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  • From STEAM research to education: An integrated art and engineering course at Georgia Tech

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe an experimental, project-based, integrated art and engineering course for undergraduate students currently taking place at Georgia Institute of Technology. The course is informed by our research study on the creative work practices of artists and engineers. A summary of this research and a description of the course are presented here. This work can inform K-16 STEM education, particularly with respect to giving students skills to participate in the creative innovation economy. View full abstract»

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  • Foreign currency trading as an inter-disciplinary teaching pathway for STEM initiatives

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Successful members of tomorrow's workforce must not only be demand learners, but must also be capable of continually reinventing themselves, while addressing, pondering and successfully resolving complex inter-disciplinary problems. Critical to developing these sustainable career capabilities and fluid thinking skills is the introduction at earlier and earlier ages, of learning environments that challenge students to process real-time information, from multiple sources and in a variety of display formats, while coaches help them to seamlessly think across multiple disciplines. Using commodity trading within the foreign currency market as a rich platform to introduce students to such challenges, while helping them integrate knowledge from the disciplines of geography, sociology, economics, signal processing, modeling, finance, statistics, politics and world trade is the core of this initiative. View full abstract»

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  • Cybersecurity — An integral part of STEM

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (217 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As technology advances in society, the number of those who threaten its security also has increased. As devices gradually contain more sensitive information, they must be protected from unauthorized access. Cybercriminals are constantly finding new exploits and threats to get around the operating system's innermost workings and steal sensitive data, and potentially make that piece of technology insecure. Since technology is an integral part of a STEM education, we must secure our cyberspace for the future by integrating cyber security with K-12 STEM education. This paper aims to educate the public about the general lack of emphasis on cybersecurity-related education at the K-12 level, possible ways to solve it, the architectures of major Operating Systems, built-in security defense mechanisms, and the most vulnerable parts of the operating system. As technology continues to advance, we must educate ourselves in order to protect our systems against unauthorized access. View full abstract»

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  • Design to manufacture — Integrating STEM principles for advanced manufacturing education

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The community and technical college systems possess unique opportunities to showcase the integration of Science, Technology, Engineering, (Art), and Math (STE(A)M) programs into cohesive, collective, and collaborative learning environments. It will be shown that involvement from separate disciplines within STEM fields facilitates a learning environment greater than the sum of its individual parts. The essential challenge to take theory shown in class, to a fully realizable product, produced in a college laboratory will be explored. A distinction between classical and modern manufacturing engineering processes will be defined. In a design study, we will look at the fundamental engineering principles of an internal combustion intake manifold system to showcase the central integration of design within STEM education. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation software will showcase that artistic design can improve the dynamics of a component. Finally, it will be shown that STEM project/product design need to be developed around advanced manufacturing techniques, ignoring the limitations of conventional machining. View full abstract»

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  • Debug'ems and other Deconstruction Kits for STEM learning

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This concept paper presents Deconstruction Kits as a means of creatively engaging learners in problem solving and critical thinking, skills that are applicable to all STEM disciplines. Deconstruction Kits, designed to promote learning while being taken apart, use reverse engineering and debugging to enhance creativity in science, computer science, and engineering curriculum. Deconstruction Kits effectively complement Constructionist (learning-by-building) technologies such as Scratch, electronic textiles, Processing, and App Inventor for Android (referred to collectively in this paper as Construction Kits). Although Construction Kits appear to be effective in engaging novices in computing and electronics through personal and participatory expression, many teachers of AP and undergraduate computer science (CS) courses and engineering (EE) courses underestimate their value. Meanwhile on the K-12 level, opportunities to learn about computing and electronics are rare. Deconstruction Kits offer successful solutions to these concerns. View full abstract»

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  • Encouraging teachers to adopt inquiry-based learning by engaging in participatory design

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Inquiry-based methods are effective for STEM education, but they are perceived as difficult to implement. Often teachers have not experienced inquiry-based learning themselves, which limits their appreciation of their value of these methods. Changing this requires modifications at the classroom level to simplify implementation of inquiry-based methods and implementing professional development for teachers to encourage adoption. A participatory design project is described that is part of a multi-year program in which five high school physics teachers are collaborating with researchers at Tufts University to develop classroom educational technology tools for promoting collaborative inquiry-based learning. By participating in a technology-design project, teachers are experiencing the inquiry process as well as developing tools that will facilitate using inquiry-based methods in their classrooms. The research and design effort to date has led to requirements for (and a prototype of) a classroom tool that promotes student collaboration and sharing of their ideas. An overview of the design process is provided along with a discussion of the activities planned for the implementation phase. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating entrepreneurship education into electrical engineering curriculum

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (79 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In accordance with the Lisbon European Council - 2000 it was identified entrepreneurship as one of the `new basic skills' for the knowledge-based economy. This paper presents an interdisciplinary approach concerned the e-entrepreneurship education highlights introduced in the academic curriculum for the students of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Department (EED) from “Transilvania” University of Brasov, Romania in the last ten school years. It experiences a successfully practices with the best results for the European and world track career of EED students. “E-Entrepreneurship” has accomplished a passive and an active component within the Electrical Engineering field, based on the propensity to induce changes oneself, and h a v i n g the ability to welcome and support innovation brought about by external factors, by welcoming change, taking responsibility for one's actions, positive or negative, or to finish what we start, to know where we are going, to set objectives and meet them, and have the motivation to succeed in any human or technical progressing action [1,2]. View full abstract»

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  • Strategies for overcoming barriers to women and minorities in STEM

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (157 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Integration of STEM education into middle and high school curricula for women and minorities poses important challenges. First the average female or minority teenager is exposed to less than 3 hours/week of STEM-related material in popular media as compared to over 100 hours/week of non-STEM content such as sports, entertainment, music, movies, legal/medical TV soaps and dramas. As a result, STEM issues are barely on their radar screens. Second, STEM curricula in most middle and high schools is not always presented in the context of real world applications and everyday needs of society that would interest this population. Third, there are very few role models available. The STEM research effort reported here attempts to find ways to diversify the STEM workforce through identification of pedagogical strategies for recruitment and retention of women and minorities into STEM classrooms and ultimately into the STEM workforce. View full abstract»

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  • Redefining success: Design of short-format engineering contests for maximal learning

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (75 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Engineering contests are a popular way to make Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) classes exciting. However, care must be taken to maximize learning. Subtle changes can mean the difference between a contest that spurs a great deal of learning and one that does not. The authors are currently teaching an innovative hands-on high school engineering program in the metropolitan New York area at seven pilot schools. The authors have run a number of short-form contests as part of this curriculum, and a number of others in the past. We analyze different features of engineering contests we have used and discuss which features maximize educational impact and understanding. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating mobile culture into computing education

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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    The term `mobile culture' describes the ever-growing influence that mobile devices, media and communication have on our day-to-day activities. Current generation of young people is often considered as one of the primary forces helping sustain the evolution of mobile technology, because young people represent a very substantial portion of early adopters and active users of mobile devices, applications, and games. For most college students, electronic gadgets and computer games have always been an integral part of their lives. Consequently, they may perceive mobile devices as true exemplars of the current technology, instead of the desktops that dominate most computer labs. This paper attempts to illustrate the reasons and the possibility of using mobile devices and mobile game development as a learning context and a motivational tool in the computing curriculum. View full abstract»

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  • The use of low cost portable microcontrollers in teaching undergraduate Computer Architecture and Organization

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents our experiences in teaching undergraduate Computer Architecture and Organization using a low cost portable microcontroller, MSP 430 manufactured by Texas Instrument Inc. This microcontroller is hosted on a USB dongle along with necessary hardware interfaces for system configuration. The microcontroller, though simple, covers basic fundamentals of computer systems, and indeed is a great platform for beginners to start with. This low cost portable device makes it possible for students to conduct labs and projects at anytime and anywhere. View full abstract»

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  • Scrapyard Challenge Jr., Adapting an art and design workshop to support STEM to STEAM learning experiences

    Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an informal learning experience for youth ages four through eleven and their families utilizing the integration of art, design, and technology to deliver STEM concepts. The workshop, titled Scrapyard Challenge Jr. 1.0 (SCJ 1.0), was developed from modifications made to an interaction design workshop oriented towards adults, in which participants build novel and expressive electronic objects using found materials and junk. Tapping into the momentum surrounding the maker and tinkerer movements, the learning experience introduces basic principles of electricity and systems thinking using hands-on activities that encourage personal and creative self-expression. Through detailing our experience we suggest that current trends in art, design, and technology practice can provide fertile ground for developing STEM learning. Indeed we argue that this triangulated space is the logical starting ground for the development of a wide variety of STEAMD initiatives. View full abstract»

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  • LYCEE: A pathway for high school students towards STEM majors

    Page(s): 1 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (327 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    LaGuardia Youth Center for Engineering Excellence (LYCEE) is established in order to address a problem of growing demand for STEM professionals in the U.S. and the issue of underrepresentation of minorities in STEM pathways. The Center's activities, including innovative hands-on engineering projects and STEM-related tutoring, are designed to promote high school students interest in choosing STEM-related majors in college and exploring STEM career possibilities in the future. During its first three years of existence, the Center has successfully served 9-12 grade students from twelve high schools in Queens. As the need for LYCEE programs arises, the Center comes forward with new initiatives to incorporate in its practices hybrid models including face-to-face and online learning modes with some unique features. View full abstract»

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  • Programming without code

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (839 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The approaching maturity of web services technology and growth of free tools, de facto standards and services on the World Wide Web has enabled a new type of "software development" to spring up, in which a minimum of actual code needs to be written, and the bulk of the complexity is handled by (often remote) third-party software. This paper will explore examples of feeding data to web services to create graphs, charts, mash-ups, musical scores or even sound files. This new type of "software development" is good for teachers, who can use this type of programming to illustrate concepts quickly. And it is good for students of science and technology fields, who can explore their subject area in new ways with such services. View full abstract»

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  • BioMEMS Summer Bioengineering Institute: Integrating engineering and biology education through BioMEMS design, fabrication, and test

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (106 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Department of Biomedical Engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) developed a BioMEMS Summer Bioengineering Institute. The focus on BioMEMS was supported by both didactic and research activities planned for the students. The research experience consisted on (i) designing and (Ii) fabricating a BioMEMS device in the Class-10 Cleanroom of the Microelectronics Facility at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and finally (iii) testing their device in a host biomedical research lab either in the University Heights (Newark, NJ) academic community, the metropolitan New York community (an easy commute), or at their home university. The students' research experience was complemented by four formal courses: three on biomedical engineering (bioelectrical signals, physiologic modeling, and imaging; biomechanics, tissue engineering, and biomaterials; biochemistry and cell biology from an engineering point of view) and a fourth one on BioMEMS. View full abstract»

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  • Achieving creativity and innovation through IEEE Pre-University divisions

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    At last year's IEEE Sections Congress, a recommendation was made to encourage and support the participation of high school students in engineering-based activities. The authors discuss their experience founding a new club at Montgomery High School, in Skillman, New Jersey. There was considerable enthusiasm for the club, which currently has twenty-five members. Students meet once a week to work on open-ended problems, developing their interest in engineering and intellectual pursuits in general. View full abstract»

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  • Mobile security labware with smart devices for cybersecurity education

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smart mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have become an integral part of our society. However, it also becomes a prime target for attackers with malicious intents. There have been a number of efforts on developing innovative courseware to promote cybersecurity education and to improve student learning; however, hands-on labs are not well developed for smart mobile devices and for mobile security topics. In this paper, we propose to design and develop a mobile security labware with smart mobile devices to promote the cybersecurity education. The integration of mobile computing technologies and smart devices into cybersecurity education will connect the education to leading-edge information technologies, motivate and engage students in security learning, fill in the gap with IT industry need, and help faculties build expertise on mobile computing. In addition, the hands-on experience with mobile app development will promote student learning and supply them with a better understanding of security knowledge not only in classical security domains but also in the emerging mobile security areas. View full abstract»

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  • Accelerated project-based introduction to EECS for high school students

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (589 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Introducing students to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) can be difficult to implement within the limited time constraints often encountered in high school summer programs because of the large amount instruction and theory needed to enable suitably complex projects. Projects of meaningful complexity require carefully balancing how much theory and design is left to the students or provided by the instructor. Here we present a short one-week project-based course developed in the summer of 2011 that introduced rising high school seniors to core concepts in EECS. Three days of instruction and teaching labs were followed by two days where students designed and constructed devices used in creating a solar-powered mobile health clinic. A carefully balanced environment enabled students to progress steadily through the entire process of designing, constructing, and testing their projects. Students then presented their work in a conference-style talk. Details of the course outline, methodology, projects, and results, are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Active engagement and cooperative learning in physics at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The United States Coast Guard Academy, one of the smallest of the United States military academies, provides a unique environment where all cadets, regardless of major, receive rigorous training in STEM disciplines. Each cadet takes a scientific, engineering, managerial, liberal arts and nautical science curriculum, in addition to their specialized training in one of eight majors. This core curriculum includes two semesters of calculus-based physics. This provides the faculty with the unique opportunity and challenge of teaching majors ranging from Government to Electrical Engineering in the same calculus-based class. The USCGA's Physics department has employed active learning since 2002. While students have showed gains in both diagnostic scores and end of course grades, faculty feel that we can further improve student understanding by focusing on cooperative learning and leadership aspects of group work. View full abstract»

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  • The integration of STEM design activities at the earliest stages of education

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (72 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper outlines the importance of hands-on design activities towards the cultivation of future leaders in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) as viewed through the perspective of a research scientist and non-educator. Today's unparalleled access to data and information has begun to undermine the discipline required to solve tough design problems independently so that when students later encounter real research they are ill prepared for the process. Design activities offer the means to inspire and motivate young K-12 students while immersing them into the exciting action of science discovery. Simple guidelines for the strategy and execution of design activities are presented as well as the observed benefits of such implementation. View full abstract»

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  • Future STEM careers begin in the primary grades

    Page(s): 1 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6677 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The reality we face in the United States is that globalization and modern communication are driving STEM technologies which will be the underpinning of the arriving “Knowledge Economy”. From our current experience in the education process it is clear that STEM education is complex in content, and requires that we, as educators, not only perfect a successful curriculum, but also lay the groundwork for attitudinal changes of the student population beginning with K-3 and possibly in the pre-K years. More than ever, this calls for parental involvement and skilled, informed communication from the educational community to and with the parents and their children. In the future, with the mushrooming of knowledge and informational content to be acquired, new tools and emphasis on the process of acquiring knowledge may be at least as vital as the knowledge itself. Collaborative design in the future world will become the norm, supported by ever more sophisticated computer based tools. View full abstract»

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  • How connections matter: factors affecting student performance in STEM disciplines

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The weakening academic performance of U.S. high school students and the declining influence of the U.S. economy have been studied extensively. Several studies have pointed to the declining interest of U.S. high school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) disciplines. This paper investigates the connectivity aspects that affect a high school student's ability to excel academically. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this paper analyzes the connections students have with their families, schools, friends, and community. Using these connections, this paper introduces an optimal prediction model named the Kalman-based Student Connectivity Model. By asking a student specific questions, this model can predict his/her cognitive reading and math performance on standardized exams. Further, this model can be used as a predictor on how modifying lifestyle choices or environmental factors may affect a student's performance in the STEM disciplines. View full abstract»

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  • Redesigning teaching approaches for undergraduate engineering classrooms

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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (207 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Teaching pedagogies are continuously evolving as technology transforms education practices by empowering students not only in the classrooms but also in research laboratories. This paper focuses on the implementation of a constructivist educational approach in engineering classrooms. In addition to engineering approaches, we will also discuss pedagogies of engagement, such as problem-based (inquiry-based) learning and team projects. Recommendations for implementing a problem-based learning (PBL) approach for electrical engineering classrooms provide for active student learning. An example of hands-on lab experiments that could be integrated in microwave and antenna design courses is provided to demonstrate the application of real-life applications for inquiry-based learning. View full abstract»

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  • Future stem careers begin in the primary grades

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6677 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The reality we face in the United States is that globalization and modern communication are driving STEM technologies which will be the underpinning of the arriving "Knowledge Economy". From our current experience in the education process it is clear that STEM education is complex in content, and requires that we, as educators, not only perfect a successful curriculum, but also lay the groundwork for attitudinal changes of the student population beginning with K-3 and possibly in the pre-K years. More than ever, this calls for parental involvement and skilled, informed communication from the educational community to and with the parents and their children. In the future, with the mushrooming of knowledge and informational content to be acquired, new tools and emphasis on the process of acquiring knowledge may be at least as vital as the knowledge itself. Collaborative design in the future world will become the norm, supported by ever more sophisticated computer based tools. View full abstract»

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