System Maintenance:
There may be intermittent impact on performance while updates are in progress. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education (WMUTE), 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on

Date 27-30 March 2012

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 84
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (174 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page i]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): i
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (35 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Title page iii]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): iii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (93 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): iv
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): v - x
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (168 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Preface

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): xi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (87 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Conference Committees

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): xii - xiv
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): xv - xvi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (67 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Keynote speakers

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): xvii - xix
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (105 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    These keynote speeches discuss the following: ubiquitous computing; Internet of Things; wearable computing; head-mounted display; body area network; human body sensing; and cloud computing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Enculturing Self-Directed Seamless Learners: Towards a Facilitated Seamless Learning Process Framework Mediated by Mobile Technology

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (343 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports an attempt to rise above the past five years' expositions and studies on 1:1 mobile seamless learning by putting forward the notions of self-directed seamless learning and facilitated seamless learning to distinguish between self- and externally-initiated seamless learning activities. In order to nurture genuine self-directed and therefore life-long learners, seamless learning practitioners ought to develop and enact systematic and cyclic Facilitated Seamless Learning (FSL) processes to enculturate the students. A generic FSL process framework is proposed for both guiding new FSL designs and analyzing existing designs. Two case studies of long-term seamless learning interventions are presented, namely, "Move, Idioms!" and the MLE science curriculum, to illustrate the versatility of the framework. Through our post-study reflections on the underpinning concepts on seamless learning and our empirical findings, we distill additional guidelines for more effective applications of the framework for new seamless learning design. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mobile Digital Storytelling for Promoting Creative Collaborative Learning

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 9 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (234 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents our on-going research efforts related to the use of mobile storytelling to support alternative ways of learning about cultural heritage. In a joint effort to promote creative collaborative learning we are working together with a local museum and an elementary school on actively engaging a group of Swedish school children in mobile digital storytelling. Divided into eight groups of three children each, the pupils took on specific roles and areas of responsibility concerning the collection of story data, such as photographs, script and sound. Before venturing into the final processing and producing of the stories, each group had to negotiate their collected data and agree on what to use for and in their story. That decision had to reflect the opinions and choices for the whole group. The outcomes of these efforts provided us with valuable insights on how mobile digital storytelling can be used in authentic contexts to support creative collaborative learning. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mobile Gaming - A Serious Business!

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 17 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (237 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the design and development of a mobile serious game and discusses the outcomes of a prototype evaluation. The game augments a physical location to represent a virtual company. Players take the role of business consultants hired by this company to help it address its problems and 'interview' virtual employees, obtaining information and physical artifacts, players must infer the problems behind the symptoms the company is facing, and offer change recommendations, utilizing higher level thinking skills. The game-like activities address issues common to business simulations by leveraging the contextual learning made possible by mobile devices and provide a context within which students bring their higher level thinking skills to bear on the problems presented by the game. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Multimodal Analysis of Spatial Characteristics of a Real-world Learning Field

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 25 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (596 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Real-world learning is important because it encourages learners to obtain knowledge through various experiences. To increase the learning effects, it is necessary to analyze the diverse learning activities that occur in real-world learning and to develop workable strategies for learning support. Our viewpoint is that a real-world learning field is the key to promoting diverse learning interactions. Using the technologies of multimodal sensing and knowledge externalization, we propose a method to capture the time-series occurrence of real-world learning and to analyze the spatial characteristics of a learning field that draws out diverse intellectual interactions. Our data analysis found that each region in a learning field draws out different real-world learning. The analysis also showed that real-world knowledge is ubiquitously but unevenly distributed. Our method contributes toward discovering knowledge useful for learning support. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Outdoor Activities for the Learning of Mathematics: Designing with Mobile Technologies for Transitions across Learning Contexts

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (771 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Guided by design-based research and the notion of seamless learning, we have designed a learning activity in mathematics where mobile and web technologies support transitions between outdoor and indoor learning contexts. The students' initiatives during the self-regulated outdoor part of the activity are scaffolded by the use of mobile technologies and activity prompts which provide means and demands for on-the-spot oral and visual recordings of the groups' experiences and strategies. We argue that the high quality of mathematical content in the recordings is due to several contributing factors: the choice of appropriate technological support, the informal settings, the availability of relevant physical references, and the immediate recording based on fresh experiences. Our data suggests that the rich nature of the recordings contributes to the effective transition and communication of the outdoor experiences to the classroom's learning context where these experiences are shared and discussed with peers. Finally, we discuss design issues related to the role of the teacher, as well as the structure of the entire activity and the implications for future design iterations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Personalization in Context-aware Ubiquitous Learning-Log System

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 41 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (669 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a ubiquitous learning log system called SCROLL (System for Capturing and Reminding of Learning Log). Learning log stands for the log of knowledge or learning experience acquired ubiquitously. This study primarily exploits a personalized learning and context-aware method supporting ubiquitous learning log system. Its aims lie in helping learners recall what they have logged (learned) making use of the contexts and learners' learning habits. The method contains three main measures, which are to recommend learning objects in accordance with both learners' needs and contexts, to detect their learning habits using the context history and to prompt them to review what they have learned regarding their learning habits. What's more, by monitoring learners' reaction on the recommendation or prompting, the method can improve its prediction. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SCROLL and the method. The results demonstrate that the system is very helpful for the learners and they benefit from the context-based recommendation and learning-style based prompting well. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sortko: Learning Sorting Algorithms with Mobile Devices

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 49 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (531 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we present a semester-long study on using smart phone devices in computer science engineering education. We developed Sortko, an Android smart phone application, which helps students in learning sorting algorithms, an important undergraduate computer science topic. The application consists of four main components - the module for interactive sorting, the scaffolding module, the motivational module and the graphical user interface module, each with a distinct role of helping students in learning sorting algorithms. Our research methodology included data collection in which we administered two surveys, collected exam and usage results. Analysis of the collected data shows our approach is an effective way of learning sorting algorithms. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A New Type of Learning Experience in Nomadic Inquiry: Use of Zydeco in the Science Center

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 57 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (373 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Zydeco is a mobile and web based system that allows students to collect and annotate multi-modal data. With the support of Zydeco, students are expected to connect their learning experiences across different learning settings. In this case study, we shadowed four 7th grade students with different achievement levels from a science class and observed how they utilized Zydeco in a science center. We analyzed their data collected with Zydeco and their final project posters to explain how students connect learning experiences in nomadic inquiry. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Study of Campus Butterfly Ecology Learning System Based on Augmented Reality and Mobile Learning

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 62 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study used augmented reality and mobile learning technologies to design a virtual butterfly ecological environment for learning butterfly ecology. Students can breed virtual caterpillars on host plants using smart phones, and become familiar with butterfly's life cycle by observing their growth. The virtual campus butterfly ecological environment can reduce the difficulty of building and managing a real butterfly garden, and solve the problems of insufficient species and amount of butterflies. Providing a context-aware learning environment, the system can enhance students' learning motivation and interest via virtual breeding and observation activities. Thus, it can be used as an assistant tool for learning butterfly ecology in elementary and junior high schools. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Architecture for Supporting Heterogeneous Multi-Device Learning Environments

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 67 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (522 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years the diversity and the ownership of mobile devices steadily increased while the prices for this kind of devices decreased to a level that allows many students to own reasonably powerful devices. As mobile devices are also being used in learning scenarios, the challenge of today is the integration of multiple heterogeneous devices into existing and upcoming learning scenarios. This paper describes an architecture that allows easy integration of various kinds of mobile and non-mobile devices. The presented architecture will be exemplified by a group discussion scenario in a heterogeneous learning environment. The paper concludes with the description of a pilot study using the described system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • CAMLES: An Adaptive Mobile Learning System to Assist Student in Language Learning

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 72 - 76
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper represents a personalized context-aware mobile learning architecture for supporting student to learn English as foreign language in order to prepare for TOEFL test. We consider how to apply open learner modeling techniques to adapt contents for different learners based on context which includes location, amount of time to learn, the manner as well as learner's knowledge in learning progress. Through negotiation with system, the editable learner model will be updated to support adaptive engine to select adaptive contents meeting learner's demands. Empirical testing results for students who used application prototype indicate that interaction user modeling is helpful support learner to learn adaptive materials. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Designing Better Mobile Collaborative Laboratories for Ecology Field Work for Upper Secondary Schools

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 77 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (242 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the next step in the iterative design process of a four-year project that explores how to use technology in the everyday ecology classroom for fieldwork. In order to proceed in making mobile science inquiries more accessible to the everyday teacher and to better understand how to design the final phases of the project we investigate how small groups of students' use new media tools to conceptualize science. The findings point to design implications that include the need to provide skills concerning the utilization of new media for small group teamwork along with more comprehensive inquiry tools for the learners to support mobile fieldwork. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development and Practice of Teaching Material in Tablet Computer Based on Computer Graphics by Quantumchemistry Calculation Reaction of I + H2?HI + H -

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 82 - 86
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (503 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed a computer graphics teaching material (QT movie) in a tablet computer (iPad), which shows rearrangement of a diatomic molecule and an atom by collision. The teaching material provides information concerning changes of potential energy and realistic image of intermediate in I + H2 → HI + H, which leads to better understanding of reaction profile. Practice of the teaching material to the university student was conducted and preliminary and posteriori surveys revealed that the teaching material on the tablet computer is very effective to provide image of "Energy" change and also effective to provide image of "Structure" change and "Migration of Electron" during chemical reaction. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Device-Free Personal Response System Based on Fiducial Markers

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 87 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (928 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Conventional student response systems require electronic devices for collecting personal responses, such as, wireless RF remote keypads, portable hand helds, PDAs, tablets, and cell phones. Although these devices are becoming inexpensive and popular, their management causes additional burdens for teachers and students. We propose a method of collecting student responses by means of printed fiducial markers and tracking technology based on computer vision. Students can submit a response by holding up their marker sheets. Teachers can continuously track and record the responses using personal IDs in real time. Multiple choice question and 2D positioning implementations are presented. We confirmed the tracking capacity of our system through an experiment with 19 participants. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Evaluating Interaction with Mobile Devices in Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 92 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We evaluate to what extent students are interacting with mobile devices in one of four ways intended in the design of a mobile learning activity. Video data from one class of fifth grade students were analyzed using a model of four different types of interaction. The evaluation shows that the students interacted with the devices in the ways intended in design 64% of the time. The contribution is an approach for translating learning goals to interaction design goals in mobile learning research. We conclude that this approach can be of value in designing and evaluating interaction with mobile devices for an entire mobile learning activity. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Folksonomy-based Indexing for Retrieving Tutoring Resources

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 97 - 101
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (270 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As more and more undergraduate students act as voluntary tutors to rural pupils after school, there is a growing need for a resource repository to support tutors during their tutoring process. However, when tutoring resources are not text-based, such as a clip of Flash animation, the technology of conventional information retrieval cannot be simply applied to retrieve these resources. Therefore, we propose a folksonomy-based indexing method to improve the performance of retrieving non-textual tutoring resources. The proposed approach consists of an initializing phase and a self-organizing phase. This study investigates the performance of constructing and maintaining the folksonomy-based index. In addition, the attitudes of tutors toward the folksonomy-based indexing method are addressed. A prototype of the tutoring resource repository has been designed and implemented, and experiments have been conducted to evaluate the proposed approach. The results show that the folksonomy-based index can be constructed and maintained efficiently. Also, survey on tutors shows the proposed approach can help them find relevant resources efficiently. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.