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Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011

Date 12-15 Oct. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 466
  • 2011 FIE conference awards presentations

    Page(s): 1 - 28
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  • Engineering & technology education college of engineering

    Page(s): 1
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  • Who was Benjamin Dasher?

    Page(s): 1 - 6
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  • Real tools, real skills. Every student, every assignmet

    Page(s): 1
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  • FIE exhibitor application and contract

    Page(s): 1
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  • Frontiers in education conference

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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  • Thursday sessions

    Page(s): 1 - 117
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  • Frontiers in education

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Monumental innovations from around the world

    Page(s): 1
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  • Wiley engineering: A tradition of innovation

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Conference program

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  • FIE 2011 preliminary conference at a glance

    Page(s): 1
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  • Global online laboratory consortium

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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  • Open source isn't just for software

    Page(s): 1
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  • Work in progress: Integration of topic modules and organization of session flow for the First-Year Seminar course in engineering to motivate and sustain student learning

    Page(s): F3D-1 - F3D-2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (327 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the overview of course instructional material in modules and the organization of these modules for presentation in sessions of the critical entry-level course, First-Year Seminar in Engineering, for undergraduate engineering majors at ABET-accredited institutions of higher education. The First-Year Seminar in Engineering at our University is offered once each year during the fall term. The enrollment can be between 45 and 50 first-year students. In recent years, the course, which is coordinated by one engineering faculty member and taught by up to fifteen different instructors, comprises a loosely organized collection of engineering and non-engineering topics delivered in twenty eight 55-minute sessions of the semester (14 weeks of instruction). The summative assessment of the student learning outcomes has revealed glaring weaknesses in content and delivery. For the incoming engineering student to receive both the holistic university experience and the ability to learn and retain fundamental engineering principles and practices, the course is being revised through central and integrative engineering design projects with service learning components. The revised structure places emphasis on the continuity across modules and sessions to ensure (a) the sustained engagement, and (b) the highest levels of student learning and retention of concepts throughout the semester. View full abstract»

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  • Set up and delivery of electrical and computer engineering projects at undergraduate engineering universities for outreach and partnership with K-12 STEM schools

    Page(s): F4D-1 - F4D-5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the set up and delivery of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) projects with critical Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) components as part of “Engage K-12 students in ECE”, the outreach and partnership program to (a) inspire K-12 students to pursue careers in ECE disciplines, and (b) integrate K-12 STEM learning with the ECE disciplines at institutes of higher education. In this form of outreach, called direct outreach, the K-12 students are invited to the University on ECE day to participate in hands-on ECE project activities in the ECE laboratories. The projects relate engineering principles to design specifications with real-world constraints. The project overview and the steps required to build and validate the design are presented by the ECE faculty member in charge of the project activities. The faculty member and currently enrolled ECE undergraduate students assist the K-12 STEM students. The K-12 students complete a survey at the end of the project as part of the summative evaluation. The survey comprised two sections (a) quantitative (b) qualitative. Despite the limited duration of each project, the students rated the projects to be very effective (greater than 3.8 on 5) in the application of STEM to real-world problems. View full abstract»

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  • Work in progress: Data-rich learning environments for engineering education

    Page(s): T2C-1 - T2C-3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Green Research for Incorporating Data in the Classroom (GRIDC) is a National Science Foundation project designed to improve instructional practices in the curricula areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The project uses data collected from renewable energy technologies at the NC Solar House, and enables students in engineering and education to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate downloadable data. Students and instructors create data-driven and conceptual models to explain information obtained from the project's website using a variety of methods involved in technical data presentation. This paper explains the GRIDC project and how students in engineering and pre-service technology, engineering and design teacher education develop higher-order thinking skills. Preliminary research has been conducted on the effective use of these materials in college level environmental engineering classes and technical animation courses in engineering graphics. This research provides a base for continued research and development on using data-rich learning environments to further develop higher-order thinking skills for students across the country. View full abstract»

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  • Learning from an initiative — Hands-on robotics workshops by IEEE Student Branch

    Page(s): S4F-1 - S4F-5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (770 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The present contribution reports initiative of a relatively new IEEE Student Branch involving students in creative activities that build motivation for their future engineering studies. The IEEE Student Branch at Haldia Institute of Technology has always attempted to put more emphasis on hands-on learning and training for fellow students through various workshops and training sessions. As a part of such activity, training sessions on basics of mobile robots are being conducted for the last 3 years. Participation has been from a wide range of backgrounds, from different streams and different undergraduate to post graduate levels. Initial aim of the workshop sessions was to motivate students in design, estimation, fabrication and testing their own ideas of basic mobile robots. During the course of events in last few years, as will be reported in the paper, several interesting findings could be identified. It is felt that in order to perform well in their workplace, as well as to be responsible citizens, students are required to not only develop mastery of a particular subject, but civic, social, interpersonal and workplace skills as well [1]. In addition to reinforcing concepts from earlier and concurrent courses, such workshops can serve as a platform for exposing students to inter-disciplinary topics that appear in greater depth in later courses. Also, students mature in areas such as oral and written communication, awareness of professional ethics issues, and working effectively in a team-based setting. Mixing of students from different disciplines and different grades greatly enhances sense of fellow feeling and team spirit. Such workshops, being conducted by students themselves, increases the sense of belongingness, inculcates maturity, sensibility, leadership qualities among the organizing students [2]. View full abstract»

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  • Does an avatar motivate?

    Page(s): T4J-1 - T4J-6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (768 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of this study is to investigate students' perceptions of their motivation to learn while possessing an avatar alongside the learning activities. The activities include attendance and accessing the course module's eLearning portal. 47 students participated in the study and were divided into two groups: an avatar group and a non-avatar group. Additionally, two research instruments were used in the study. Firstly, an avatar environment named Avatar Hall was developed to allow the students from the avatar group to view their avatars. The second instrument was a motivation inventory, which was used to identify the students' perceptions of the extent to which the presence of an avatar motivated them to learn. The results for both groups show a moderate percentage distribution of the students' perceptions of their motivation to learn and further statistical test reveal no significant difference between the two groups of students in terms of their motivation to learn. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing capstone design education in civil engineering: The potential synergies between academics and practitioners

    Page(s): T1F-1 - T1F-6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (514 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The trend toward increasing design component in civil engineering curricula is part of an effort to better prepare graduates for the practice. While some design projects are still of the “made up” type; majority of projects today deal with “real-world problems” and are usually conducted by student's teams. The paper begins first by briefly reviewing the design as a “thought” process, focusing on “design thinking” and how “design thinking” skills are acquired. Second, the paper reports on the development, implementation, and subsequent evaluation of a senior design course at an international university, where practitioners from the Region have played a major role in teaching the capstone course. The restructured design course has met its objectives and exposed students to design practice. This industry-driven experience has also provided information on curricular content and capabilities of graduates. Outputs from the course can be used to provide guidance into: curricular changes, teaching methods, and civil engineering practice in the Region. Also, helps in establishing enduring connections with the industrial sector. View full abstract»

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  • Tragedy in the gulf: A call for a new engineering ethic

    Page(s): F2J-1 - F2J-5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (588 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The question that the present work addresses is how might we move the engineering profession towards a more encompassing engineering ethic and do it in a way which the practitioners might be receptive to such new ideas? Put another way, how might we develop a new engineering ethic, which focuses more upon the results as evidence by its adoption across the myriad of disciplines rather than the purity or elegance of the argument? The present work seeks to offer one approach that might work borrowing from our developing view of complex systems theory. One important characteristic of a complex system - and we shall consider others - is that a system is composed of interconnected parts that as a whole exhibit one or more properties. Stated another way, the behavior among the possible properties may not be obvious from the properties of the individual parts. The proposed new ethic also integrates new ideas from quantum mechanics as well as eco-philosophy. View full abstract»

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  • Evolution of the university of denver engineering programs due to ABET accreditation criteria

    Page(s): S1B-1 - S1B-6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (405 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Radical changes in the engineering programs at the University of Denver came in 1996 with the advent of ABET EC2000. Prior to EC2000, the engineering programs were developed based on the experience of faculty, the numbers of students and faculty, laboratory resources necessary to deliver the programs, and the accreditation requirements. As disciplinary programs evolved from a general engineering program and the number of students was low, this was a difficult process under the old ABET Criteria; the new ABET Criteria gave opportunities to design unique programs. New curricula were developed in 1996 along with an assessment process that took into account the needs of constituencies. Since then, the programs, assessment processes, as well as the process of determining the needs of constituencies have evolved substantially. Ethics has evolved from half of a course shared with engineering economic to ethics throughout the curricula; engineering economics has evolved into a full course for the BSME program, and an engineering entrepreneurship course for the BSEE and BSCpE programs; a legal studies course is required in the BSEE and BSCpE curricula; an option in Mechatronics Systems Engineering has been added to the BSEE program; and 5 year dual degree programs have been created that combine BS and MS degrees. View full abstract»

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  • Work in progress — Transversal competencies contributions to Computer Science 1 course

    Page(s): S3G-1 - S3G-3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (443 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A competence may be generically defined as the capacity of doing something and is more than just skills or knowledge. A transversal competence is one which can be re-used when shifting to another context. Our goal is to contribute to improve Computer Science 1 (CS1) course's results by the systematic incorporation of activities based on transversal competencies. We designed a set of activities to enhance the development of transversal competencies, specially planning and time management, team work and communication skills. Hypothetically, we propose that including this kind of activities helps to obtain better results in the course. An initial experimentation was done in 2010. The preliminary results show a remarkable positive difference in student's results. In the selected group the fail rate was only 12% (3 of 25 students). In other groups, the fail rate was 32% (8 of 25 students) and 40% (8 of 20 students). In previous years, this rate was approximately 40%. View full abstract»

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  • Measuring CS1 perceptions of parallelism

    Page(s): S3E-1 - S3E-6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (629 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Educators in Computer Science (CS) generally agree that teaching concurrency can be difficult. CS programs typically offer parallel and distributed computing topics as advanced courses. A potential alternative approach is to provide instruction on parallelism early in the undergraduate curriculum, emphasizing conceptual design rather than implementation issues. This introduction of “parallel-thinking” to beginning CS undergraduates represents an innovation and significant extension to existing standard Computer Science curricula. The research described in this paper investigated the feasibility of integrating parallel computing concepts into a first-year CS course. To quantitatively assess student comprehension of parallel computing, an experimental two-factor mixed group design educational study was conducted to evaluate a control group and two instructional interventions: (1) lecture only, and (2) lecture with laboratory work using a software visualization Parallel Analysis Tool (PAT) specifically designed for this project. The Perceptions of Parallelism Survey (PoPS), a new evaluation instrument developed for this study and modeled after the Force Concept Inventory (FCI), was used to measure student learning. The results from this educational study show a statistically significant main effect among the repeated measures. PoPS results measured during the ninth week of the course reveal that performance levels remained high compared to pre-course performance scores. View full abstract»

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