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Microsystems, Packaging, Assembly and Circuits Technology Conference (IMPACT), 2011 6th International

Date 19-21 Oct. 2011

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): c1
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  • Information page

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 2
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  • Welcome message from Shen-Li Fu, conference chair

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 3 - 7
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  • Committee member

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 8 - 10
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  • Plenary speech

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 11 - 13
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  • Session 2: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 14
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  • Session 3: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 15
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  • Session 4: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 16
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  • Session 6: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 17
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  • Session 7: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 18
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  • Session 9: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 19
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  • Session 10: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 20
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  • Session 11: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 21
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  • Session 12: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 22
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  • Session 14: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 23
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  • Session 15: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 24
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  • Session 16: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 25
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  • Session 26: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 26
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  • Poster session: Index

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 27 - 28
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  • The wetting interaction between electroless NiP deposit/Cu substrate and SnAg solder

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 29 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (731 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electroless NiP deposit has been frequently mentioned as the barrier laer for Cu substrate or metallization for the soldering process. The NiP deposit is solderable with many solders at appropriate temperature and operation condition. The present study attempted to investigate the wetting behavior of the Sn3Ag solder on the electroless NiP with wetting balance at 250°C and 270°C. The cross section of the wetting specimen was further investigated for the interaction and the interfacial microstructure between the solder and the NiP/Cu substrate. The interface was composed of Ni3Sn4 and Ni3P compound layers. A Ni-Sn-P layer was detected between these two compound layers. The thickness of these layers was analyzed for the growth kinetics. The growth of these layers were found to follow an empirical power law log h(thickness) = log k(constant) + n log t(time). The variation in n values was discussed in relating to the growth mechanism of these two layers. View full abstract»

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  • Leadless IC package with a substrate produced by copper/nickel/copper-3-layer-clad material

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 33 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1442 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Terminal units such as mobile phones, portable game systems and electronic books, have spread all over the world and advanced to be smaller, more lightweight and thinner every moment. Simultaneously, the inner electronic parts such as batteries, IC packages and connectors were also smaller and thinner. For example, in order to reduce the occupied area and space on the printed circuit board (PCB), some lead flame type IC packages such as SOP(Small Outline Package) and QFP(Quad Flat Package) have changed to leadless type ones such as SON(Small Outline Non-lead), QFN(Quad Flat Non-lead) and LGA. (Land Grid Array) The substrates of such leadless IC packages are usually made of a single metal plate such as a copper, a copper alloy and a nickel and conventionally produced through etching process or plating process. So the designs for the package like the size, the number of terminal and the total thickness are limited. In order to solve such problems, we developed a new manufacturing method, using clad materials which rolled copper (Cu) foil and nickel (Ni) plating layer on electrolysis Cu foil were laminated. In detail, the components were consisting of 18μm to 35μm thickness Cu foil with about 1 um thickness Ni plating layer and around 100μm thickness rolled Cu sheet (Cu/Ni/Cu material). These materials are characterized by the cladding interface between the rolled Cu foil and the Ni plating layer on the electrolysis Cu foil, which is bonded by the surface activated bonding (SAB) method [1, 2, 3]. Namely, the interface is so flat that it is suitable to use for selective etching work [4, 5]. In this paper, we would like to introduce the new IC package manufacturing process with the Cu/Ni/Cu material. This method makes some new package designs possible and achieves high productivity when comparing to the conventional method. We produced various leadless IC packages with the total thickness of 0.25mm to 0.5mm, with the number of 3 to 460 terminals - t 1 row to 4 rows for terminals by means of this new method. In addition, in order to evaluate the package performance, we made the package with the total thickness of 0.43mm, with 164 terminals of diameter of 0.25mm at 3 rows and the terminal pitch of 0.5mm. In this sample, heat-tolerance by the solder reflow test with the pre-condition of JEDEC (Joint Electron Device Engineering Council) standard of level 3 was estimated and the package warpage in the range of 25 to 260 degrees Celsius was measured. As the results, the package sample could pass the reflow test of the JEDEC level 3 and the warp of the package was less than 50μm. View full abstract»

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  • Palladium surface finishes for copper wire bonding (Part I: The selection of surface finishes)

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 37 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    During the past two years, fine pitch copper wire bonding has finally entered high volume production. It is estimated that nearly 15% of all wire bonders used in production are now equipped for copper wire bonding. Most of these are used exclusively for copper wire bonding. In terms of pitch, copper wire is only barely lagging behind the most advanced gold applications. The most commonly used copper wire is 20um in diameter and 18um copper wire is entering final qualification. Evaluations with even finer wire are underway. Although some technical challenges remain, many years of research have now resolved most of the problems associated with copper wire bonding and attention is beginning to shift from merely ensuring reliable manufacturing processes to optimizing processes for efficiency and throughput. The most advanced wire bonders now have pre-configured processes specifically designed for copper. In addition to throughput optimization, further cost reductions are being sought. Among these is the desire to eliminate the high-cost gold not just from the wire, but also from the substrate. On the substrate side the electronics packaging industry still works with electrolytic nickel / electrolytic (soft) gold (Ni/Au) for copper wire bond applications. This surface finish works with copper wire bonding but includes some disadvantages, such as: - Thick expensive Au layers of 0.1 to 0.4μm - Electrically connected pads (bussing for the plating) which require added space on the substrate. - Pd-coated copper wire often delivers better results on gold covered finishes, but is two to three times more expensive as pure copper wire. Furthermore electrolytic Ni/Au was not chosen as a result of in-depth investigations for the most effective surface finish. The selection was made because it was the surface finish with the highest distribution in the market for wire bond packages. This paper is offering the results of a two company joint work regarding an alternative copp- r wire bondable surface finish for substrates mainly with palladium as the final copper wire bondable layer. This offers further cost reduction possibilities. Furthermore, copper palladium intermetallics are regarded as very reliable. View full abstract»

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  • Vacuum underfill technology for advanced packaging (IMPACT 2011)

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 42 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed vacuum underfill (VCUF) technology for large die (>;18 × 18 mm) with fine pitch area array bumps (<; 150 μm pitch) to solve a critical underfill void issue. Material development and process optimization are the keys to realize a stable process for future package. It was also confirmed that the newly developed underfill materials have good reliability on the large die package with vacuum assisted underfill process. View full abstract»

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  • Microwave hydrogen plasma annealing to improve electrical and optical properties of aluminum doped zinc oxide films

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 47 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (881 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To investigate whether microwave hydrogen plasma can improve the electrical and optical properties of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) films or not, AZO films prepared with different substrate temperature were treated with microwave hydrogen plasma. The AZO films were post-treated by one 2.45 GHz microwave hydrogen plasma system with 25 torr, 700 W and 10 minutes. It was observed the electrical and optical properties of all AZO films prepared with different substrate temperatures were apparently improved with microwave hydrogen plasma. Taking 200°C produced AZO films as an example, the electrical resistivity decreases 43% and the average optical transmittance increases 7% respectively. Microwave hydrogen plasma makes AZO films recrystallization like process from measured results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrograph and transmission electron micrograph. The oxygen adsorption on grain boundary of AZO films after microwave hydrogen plasma apparently decreases observed from results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The above two phenomena may be the mechanism why microwave hydrogen plasma cam improve the electrical and optical properties of AZO films. This work contributes to industries like touch panel, solar cells. etc. which transparent conductive films belong to the industry product's component. View full abstract»

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