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Games Innovation Conference (IGIC), 2011 IEEE International

Date 2-3 Nov. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 39
  • 2-day conference program

    Page(s): 1 - 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The iTron Family of geocast games (extended abstract)

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1501 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Geocast games are a new class of digital multiplayer games, inherently involving vigorous physical activity in outdoor natural settings such as parks, camps, or athletic fields. They are designed for commercial location-aware smartphones carried or worn by players, without requiring consoles or internet connections. The iTron Family of geocast games illustrates how physical athletic play can be combined with real-time strategic, imaginative, and creative cognitive play from the domain of digital games to produce sports of the future appealing to a wide range of ever more sophisticated players. View full abstract»

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  • Enabling collaborative learning with an educational MMORPG

    Page(s): 101 - 103
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    In order to provide interesting theoretical education of software engineering, this paper presents a collaborative learning environment on the base of a multiplayer online game platform. A matching mechanism is designed to facilitate the collaboration among students with complementary knowledge. The implemented educational game can be used as a supplementary tool for traditional classroom teaching. View full abstract»

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  • The Ghost Club Storyscape: Designing for transmedia storytelling

    Page(s): 104 - 106
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    One of the key questions about transmedia storytelling is how to design a participant's experience across different media so that it is connected and perceived as a whole. We extract four components for building such connections from current work in media studies and production literature and practice. These proposed design components are mythology, canon, character and genre. To test this approach we have designed and developed a group of connected digital media expressions, The Ghost Club Storyscape, to experiment with these four ingredients on multiple media. View full abstract»

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  • Player guiding in an active video game

    Page(s): 107 - 108
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    The unique challenges in guiding players in an active video game (or exergame) using physical input devices are explored. The solutions discovered through the process of iterative design and multiple rounds of playtesting are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Remote Kenken: A networked real hopping game based on hopscotch

    Page(s): 109 - 112
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1353 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An exertainment support system called Remote Kenken is proposed in this paper. The game resembles hopscotch. Pressure sensors are used to determine the position of the feet of a player and judge the accuracy of the steps during jumping. Victory or defeat is decided by the accuracy of the step and time required. The support system is networked to a server to allow the game to be played remotely by more than one player. Experiments were performed with players located in different rooms playing the game simultaneously. The test results suggest that the subjects could enjoy the game as an exercise and entertainment. The system also includes video and audio equipment for communication and awareness of the steps. View full abstract»

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  • Motion selection and motion parameter control using data gloves

    Page(s): 113 - 114
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (347 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a data-glove-based interface that controls many types of motion and their styles. We use hand positions to select a motion type and finger angles to control the motion parameters. We employ motion blending to generate the target motion with a set of example motion data for each type of motion. Finally, we intend to conduct a user experiment in which we compare our interface with an equivalent gamepad-based interface. View full abstract»

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  • Face and gaze tracking as input methods for gaming design

    Page(s): 115 - 116
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    Real-time face detection combined with eye-gaze tracking and face analysis can provide a new means of user input in a gaming environment. Game designers can use facial information in various ways in designing the user interface (UI) and to provide smarter modes of interaction with players. View full abstract»

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  • A pervasive game to know your city better

    Page(s): 117 - 120
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    This paper presents a pervasive game on Android platform where players can play a knowledge competition tour in groups in the city of Trondheim, and gain better understanding of the city through solving different tasks. From the evaluation, the result shows that the concept of using pervasive game in a learning context is an interesting concept that should be explored. View full abstract»

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  • Fractal territory board game

    Page(s): 12 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel fractal board game is proposed by applying the concept of subdivision of fractals to an NxN grid of a continuous game board that consists of vertices and edges. The game board can be infinitely subdivided, thus generating an infinite number of sub-games. The application of the subdivision rule balances the dominance of the leading player by providing opportunities for the disadvantaged players to catch up, thus making gameplay more interesting. As additional subdivisions add to the complexity of the game, the gameplay can be maintained by a friendly GUI. This GUI provides camera control for regions of interest on the game board and hints for scoring. The proposed fractal territory board game can be played on fractal game boards where the subdivision of a shape keeps sub-games sharing edges and introduces new vertices. View full abstract»

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  • Dancing game by digital textile sensor, accelerometer and gyroscope

    Page(s): 121 - 123
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (397 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel dancing game, comprised of pressure sensors on socks with accelerometer and gyroscope to detect the movement of the player, is presented. The firmware in microcontroller can judge the movement of the player with enough accuracy such that the player would not be limited by wires and resident equipments. We designed a novel wearable entertainment system to provide a mixed reality game in which users can play dancing game. View full abstract»

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  • Power defense: A video game for improving diabetes numeracy

    Page(s): 124 - 125
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Adolescents with T1D often have poor control of their disease. With the knowledge that the current generation appreciates and learns more from interactive approaches to teaching, we have developed Power Defense, a highly interactive video game aimed at improving one particular skill associated with managing diabetes - numeracy. Diabetes-related numeracy encompasses the ability to understand and interpret results and then appropriately apply the results to the management of diabetes. Power Defense employs the principals of experiential learning and includes both implicit and explicit methods for teaching the player the necessary diabetes numeracy skills. View full abstract»

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  • Observations on designing a computer science Curriculum focusing on game programming using testimonials from industry leaders

    Page(s): 126 - 129
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    The 2008 ACM/IEEE Curriculum Report section 5.4.2 mentions a “Focus on games or entertainment software” as one method of organizing a computer science curriculum. But outside of using games as a methodology for teaching standard computer science, it is also worth considering whether the techniques taught actually transition to the games industry. This paper will explain the IEEE standard for a computer science curriculum, and then compare those milestones with what the games industry wants using interviews with game professionals who are responsible for hiring decisions at top companies. View full abstract»

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  • SCETF: Serious game surgical cognitive education and training framework

    Page(s): 130 - 133
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1087 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Surgical proficiency requires command of both technical and cognitive skills. Although at times overlooked, cognitive skills training allows residents to practise detecting errors ultimately leading to a reduction of errors. Virtual simulations and serious games offer a viable alternative to practice in an actual operating room where traditionally both technical and cognitive skills acquisition takes places. They provide residents the opportunity to train until they reach a specific competency level in a safe, cost effective, fun, and engaging manner allowing them to make more effective use of their limited training time in the operating room. Here we introduce a serious game surgical cognitive education and training framework (SCETF) that is currently being developed specifically for cognitive surgical skills training. Domain-specific surgical “modules” can then be built on top of the existing framework, utilizing common simulation elements/assets. The SCETF is being developed as a research tool where various simulation parameters such as levels of audio and visual fidelity, can be easily adjusted allowing for the controlled testing of such factors on knowledge transfer and retention. View full abstract»

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  • A breathing game with capacitive textile sensors

    Page(s): 134 - 136
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Computer games are developed to encourage practice of thoracic or abdominal breathing for physiological and pathological treatment. It is demonstrated by using an exercise shirt embedded with two sets of dual sensors controlled by LM555 and PIC24FJ256 microprocessors, with animated display onto a computer screen. Results and future work are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Serious game design I: The bicameral sketch

    Page(s): 137 - 138
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (287 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A practical method for conducting the first stages of the design of a serious game is presented. The idea is to have two designers, and instructional designer and a game designer, prepare short overall designs using a two page document called a sketch. They then merge the two using a process that combines a storyboard and a walkthrough. The final result is a single short design document that can be used in successive stages. View full abstract»

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  • Immersive mobile gaming with scanned laser pico projection systems

    Page(s): 17 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A scanned laser pico projector's advantages, in the space of motion sensed and/or mobile gaming, is explored in this paper. In order to better appreciate the applications, we first briefly delve into the operation of a MicroVision MEMS-based scanned laser pico projection engine. From there we described how we accomplish immersive gaming by citing as an example a novel prototype system that we have constructed. We further go on to present the key findings on user experience of this system in a survey conducted at the CeBIT, 2011 in Hannover, Germany. View full abstract»

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  • Achieving connected home architectural simplicity

    Page(s): 20 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (117 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Home networking mandates today multitude of devices to communicate seamlessly which is very difficult because of existing network and device nature. This paper argues on the basic tenet of communication, the IPC mechanism to be standardized to a considerable scale. Bringing standardization will enhance the innovation in device interoperability and latency reduction instead of focus shifting towards resolving the issues surrounding these. A case for gaming devices and application integration which leads to innovation is discussed in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • IgnitePlay: Encouraging and sustaining healthy living through social games

    Page(s): 23 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many successful social and casual games use techniques in their design that help sustain players' interest over time. The success of these games amongst players who consider themselves `non-gamers' has resulted in the development of applications that attempt to use these same techniques to encourage behavior change in the real world. Most of these applications gamify their sites by adopting a system of points, badges, and leveling up. In this paper, we take a different approach. In collaboration with Igniteplay - a company created to develop a product to encourage users to adopt a healthy life style through online social media - we investigated the connection between social game and media design mechanics and user motivation. This investigation led to several concrete techniques that we are currently testing and revising in the hope that such techniques will enhance participant retention. In this paper, we discuss these techniques and outline future directions. View full abstract»

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  • Survey on how Norwegian teenagers play video games

    Page(s): 26 - 28
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    This paper presents results from a survey among Norwegian teenagers with the goal to reveal how they play video games, how much they play, the game platform they prefer, how much time they spend on playing mobile games, and the game genres they prefer. View full abstract»

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  • Applying the technology acceptance model to investigate the factors comparing the intention between EIVG and MCG systems

    Page(s): 29 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study investigated technology acceptance model of students by using Embodied Interactive Video Games (EIVGs) and Mouse Click Games (MCGs) to learn English tenses. Junior high students (N = 200) were selected, and divided into two groups. Selected students in both EIVG and MCG group have to practice English tenses five times. After the practice, all students have to fill the technology acceptance model questionnaire. The results of this study indicated that students' attitude and intentions may influence by the Perceived Usefulness. If the game makes students learn more from the content, it will trigger students' attitude and intention to use game-based learning systems. View full abstract»

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  • Classification of cognitive states of attention and relaxation using supervised learning algorithms

    Page(s): 31 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (324 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The study of cognitive states has attracted the attention of artificial intelligence researchers searching for mechanisms to enable brain-computer communication. With the advent of portable brain-computer interfaces, it is now possible to study human behaviors towards using cognitive states in gaming environments. NeuroSky's Mindset is a device with the operating principle of enabling portable EGG sensors to allow the reading of brain frequencies in real time. We believe that this type of device may be a very adaptable option to videogames to create new experiences and allow a new control mechanism. This interaction would be easy and natural and based less on motion and physical effort. This paper reports an assessment of the Mindset reader, particularly in relation to classifying the cognitive states of attention and relaxation, behaviors associated to the brain waves read by the device, using supervised learning algorithms. The aim is to estimate behaviors using human brain frequencies as inputs. View full abstract»

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  • Experiment on social multiplayer multimodal games

    Page(s): 35 - 36
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    This paper presents results from an experiment where 35 teenagers tested a social multiplayer multimodal games with the focus to discover attitude towards such games, and if there were any differences in terms of gender and how much the subjects play games every week. View full abstract»

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  • The relation between students' anxiety and interest in playing an online game

    Page(s): 37 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (390 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the past decades, the education of students has progressively shifted from the traditional teaching environments to technology-assisted settings. In Taiwan, the preference to provide students with multimedia in environments shared by their peers is gaining acceptance and public attention. Therefore, “Chinese Idioms String Up Puzzle game,” a new text reconstruction online program was developed by the Digital Game-Based Learning Laboratory, National Taiwan Normal University in Taiwan to encourage students to use their organizing schemes to learn Chinese Idioms. A survey was conducted to examine participants' anxiety, interest and cognitive load by using this new computer-assisted game. According to the survey, students felt this new program is interesting and would like to play again in the future. For those students who believe anxiety helps their performance, and for those students whose degree of anxiety lowered after completing the test, they tended to have greater interests in playing the game. Findings of the Partial Least Squares (PLS) contribute to an expanded understanding of both psychological anxiety and somatic anxiety influence their cognitive load, whereas both anxieties was not significantly related to their playing interest. In addition, the study results indicated that the higher degree of psychological and somatic anxiety, the greater cognitive load participants had. View full abstract»

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  • The future of work is play: Global shifts suggest rise in productivity games

    Page(s): 40 - 43
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    Shifts in global, societal, technological, economic, and socio-political trends will shape the future of work. The culmination of these distinct trends across multiple facets of societal and technological advancement will lead to an increased use of game mechanics in the workplace of the future. Over the last several years, several Microsoft teams have deployed “productivity games” to improve software engineering processes through the application of game mechanics. Augmenting a business process with game mechanics has led to significant productivity improvements. These lessons support the notion that games can - and will - be an important component of the workplace of the future. View full abstract»

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