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Culture and Computing (Culture Computing), 2011 Second International Conference on

Date 20-22 Oct. 2011

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C1
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  • [Title page i]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): i
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  • [Title page iii]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): iii
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): v - ix
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  • Message from Conference Chairs

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): x
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  • Conference organization

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): xi
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  • Program Committees

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): xii - xiii
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  • External Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): xiv
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  • Keynote Talk

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): xv - xix
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (712 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modern history has been told primarily through the written text. This is natural and richly rewarding. At the same time, however, such fixation on language cuts us off from an enormous body of historically fascinating material embedded in the visual world - the photographs, prints, paintings, popular graphics, and material objects that saturate everyday life and decisively influence how we see ourselves and others. Visualizing Cultures is an innovative website that opens windows on modern history by integrating graphic images, expert commentary, elegant design, and substantial databases in ways that have only recently become technologically possible. It can be accessed at http://visualizingcultures.mit.edu. Launched at MIT in 2002, the site has focused topically to date on Japan and Asia in the modern world. The principal directors are John W. Dower and Shigeru Miyagawa of MIT. Our case-study focus to date has been Asia in the modern world. Thirty elaborate units are now online-and in the process of developing these we have developed considerable knowledge in all aspects of this sort of digital humanities, including technology, legal issues (notably, intellectual property), education-oriented design and editing, the presentation of potentially controversial images, etc. We have also sharpened our understanding of how the Web can be used to advance image-driven scholarship of a sort more expansive than is possible in e-journals-including inclusion of large and (where appropriate) bilingual databases. We also have developed institutional partnerships with museums and other repositories of graphic images that can become a model for others exploring these same frontier. View full abstract»

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  • Animating and Interacting with Ancient Chinese Painting - Qingming Festival by the Riverside

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 3 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1226 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method to display a famous Chinese ancient painting for the purpose of cultural heritage preservation. In order to animate the painting, some objects are extracted from the repainted painting and redrawn with three dimensional figures. Consequently the computer animation and Image-based rendering techniques are used to drive these objects animated. Furthermore, the users can interact with displayed painting, they can wave their hand to the virtual avatars in the ancient painting, and can get interactive responses. In addition, the avatars can be customized with the new algorithm we developed. In our algorithm, only one photo is required, and it can be captured on site. After the capturing, the 3D virtual character, or we called avatars, are created and integrated in the virtual environment. View full abstract»

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  • Linking Norms and Culture

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 9 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The goal of this paper is to propose a method of modelling the evolution of social norms in different cultural settings. We analyse the role of culture in shaping agents' normative reasoning and hence their behaviour. The general notion of 'value' is discussed from the perspective of the BDI framework as a means to represent cultural regularities in social interactions. Culture is described as a system of shared values, which are linked to the Hofstede dimensions of culture. This system is represented by so-called metanorms that define appropriate, culturally-varying, behaviour in different relational contexts. In this way culture affects the possibility of normative changes, in particular the acceptance of policies designed to issue new norms in a society. Throughout the paper a scenario related to the enactment of smoking ban policies in Europe is presented to discuss the evaluation of normative change in specific cultural settings. View full abstract»

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  • A Serious Game and Artificial Agents to Support Intercultural Participatory Management of Protected Areas for Biodiversity Conservation and Social Inclusion

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 15 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1102 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper addresses our experience in the design of a serious game, aimed at computer-based support for intercultural participatory management of protected areas (e.g., parks, marine reserves, biosphere reserves...), in order to promote biodiversity conservation and social inclusion. Its objective is, via a computer assisted role-playing game, to help various stakeholders (e.g., environmentalist, tourism operator, traditional community...) to collectively understand conflict dynamics and explore negotiation strategies for the management of protected areas. Therefore, this helps at mutual understanding and negotiation between different cultures, contexts and practices (traditional community, technical manager, environmentalist...) about strategic issues when aiming at both biodiversity conservation and social inclusion. After introducing the objectives of our serious game, named Sim Parc, we will describe its design and its current architecture. We will also discuss the introduction of various types of agents in the system: a decision making agent playing the role of the park manager, artificial players replacing some of the human players in the game, assistant agents assisting human players, and expert agents providing human players with technical information about the viability of their proposal (e.g., about the survival of an endangered species), or to analyse relations (e.g., dominance or equity) among players proposals. This last type of agent aims at introducing a technical viewpoint and culture in this intercultural participatory process. Some of these agents have already been implemented and tested and some others are in progress. View full abstract»

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  • Alignment of Remote Cultures: In Contrast to the Relevance Theory of Communication

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 21 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the role of ontology in a multilingual setting becomes important to Semantic Web development, it becomes necessary to understand and model how an original conceptual meaning of a Source Language word is conveyed into a Target Language translation. Terminological ontology [1] is a tool used for knowledge sharing and domain-specific translation, and could potentially be suitable for simulating the cognitive models explaining real-world inter-cultural communication scenarios. In this paper, a framework referred to as the Relevance Theory of Communication [2] is contrasted to an empirical study applying Tversky's contrast model [3] to data-sets obtained from the terminological ontology. The results indicate that the alignment of two language-dependent terminological ontologies is a potential method for optimizing the relevance required in inter-cultural communication, in other words, for identifying corresponding concepts existing in two remote cultures. View full abstract»

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  • Omnidirectional 3D Visualization for the Analysis of a Large-Scale Corpus: Tripitaka Koreana

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 27 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1431 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the research and development of a new omni spatial visualization framework for the collaborative interrogation of the world's largest Buddhist textual canon, using the worlds' first panoramic stereoscopic visualization environment - the Advanced Visualization and Interaction Environment (AVIE). The work is being undertaken at a new research facility, The Applied Laboratory for Interactive Visualization and Embodiment (ALiVE), City University of Hong Kong. The dataset used is the Chinese Buddhist Canon, Koryo version (Tripitaka Korean a) in classical Chinese, the with 52 million glyphs carved on 83,000 printing blocks in 13th century Korea. The digitized version of this Canon (a project led by University of California Berkeley) contains metadata that links to geospatial positions, contextual images of locations referenced in the text, and to the original rubbings of the wooden blocks. Each character has been abstracted to a 'blue dot' to enable rapid search and pattern visualization. Omni spatial refers to the ability to distribute this data in 360-degrees around the user where the virtually presented visual space is in three dimensions (3D). The project's omni directional interactive techniques for corpora representation and interrogation offer a unique framework for enhanced cognition and perception in the analysis of this dataset. View full abstract»

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  • Earth Girl Saves the Day: A Computer Game Prototype about Earth Hazards

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 33 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (20558 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Earth Girl is the story of an Asian girl who can save her family and friends from natural hazards. The story is being developed as a computer game and an animated short. This paper presents the design philosophy and progress report on the single level game prototype, one that is meant to help players gain a better understanding of natural hazards through imaginative and fun game play. Earth Girl the computer game seeks to raise the regional awareness of Earth hazards while providing simple but engaging game play that is as fun as it is culturally sensitive and based on scientific fact. View full abstract»

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  • Clustering Bayon Face Towers Using Restored 3D Shape Models

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 39 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6371 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Bayon, the well-known Khmer temple at Angkor in Cambodia, is famous for its numerous massive stone face towers. Researchers believe that these facial sculptures can be divided into several meaningful categories. Unlike previous studies, in this paper, each face tower is treated as a basic unit in the classification procedure, as we find that faces located on the same tower have a higher similarity value than those which belong to different ones. 3D replicas acquired by digital scanning are used and a restoration scheme based on the matrix recovery theory is adopted within each tower in order to eliminate the impact of data incompletion. Towers are represented by the average shapes of restored faces and hierarchically clustered based on their similarity values. The spatial distribution of the clustering result shows that there are some patterns among the structure of Bayon, which could be meaningful through further archaeological research. View full abstract»

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  • The Art-Space of a Global Community: The Network of Baroque Paintings in Hispanic-America

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 45 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (671 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the results of a multidisciplinary collaboration in Digital Humanities that focuses on the multi-scale analysis of the network of Baroque paintings in the territories of the Hispanic Monarchy from the 16th through the 18th centuries. We apply graph analysis and visualizations as well as natural language analysis over a database of over 11,000 artworks in order to address three types of questions related, respectively, to the formation and sustainability of large cultures, the semantic content of the network we analyze, and the role of art as an institution that contributes to sustain large-scale socities. The results also help to design a methodology that can be exported to other projects in Digital Humanities. View full abstract»

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  • Imagining Historic Fashion: Digital Tools for the Examination of Historic Dress

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 51 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1181 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The mid-19th century saw the rise of institutional collections which brought together artifacts from cultures and industry around the world for the enlightenment and entertainment of the public, and to raise the standards of the products of the industrial age. Inexpensive digital imaging and the internet have radically changed how we disseminate these artifacts in the best way to the most people. A charge to digital humanities collections now is to make the quality and significance of the virtual representation meet or exceed that of the original object and to create user interactions which are "conducive to information foraging" [1]. This paper discusses an inter-disciplinary, multi-cultural project to develop a best practices digital archive for historic costume using advanced digital technology to realize new ways of interpreting, examining and contextualizing historic fashion and how these realizations translate into real world application and effective classroom tools. View full abstract»

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  • Towards a Dialogic Archive: Canadian Copyright Law, Digital Archives and Fair Dealing

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 57 - 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (325 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Intellectual property laws present formidable challenges for digital cultural archiving projects. While cultural institutions may be permitted to make works available to the public, these rights may not cover online publishing or reproduction. Consequently, institutions undertake time-consuming, resource-intensive clearance processes in order to secure licenses for displaying copyright protected cultural works online. In response to these challenges, the New Media Collaboration Centre at York University (Toronto) has developed Art mob, a content management system (CMS) with a dialogic approach to copyright informed by the fair dealing provisions of Canadian copyright law. The user interface design of this CMS facilitates uses covered by fair dealing, enables administrators to enter and display information regarding the layering of rights in cultural works, solicits information about unidentified rights holders and the creation of works from communities of users, and invites rights holders to assert their rights and license works. View full abstract»

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  • Features of Accuracy Mismatch between Back-Translated Sentences and Target-Translated Sentences

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 63 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (502 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In communication using a machine translation, inaccurate translation prevents effective communication between individuals and leads to misunderstandings. Back-translation is used to check the accuracy of a sentence translated to a native language. For back-translation to be used as a method for checking the accuracy of a translated sentence, it has to satisfy the following conditions: There must be a positive correlation between the accuracy of sentences translated to an intermediate language and that of back-translated sentences, and there can be no significant difference between them. From the results of our verification, we found that back-translation satisfies these conditions. However, we found that accuracy mismatch case 1, which means that a back-translated sentence is accurate but the translated sentence is inaccurate, occurred although the number of such accuracy mismatch cases was small. Accuracy mismatch case 1 can lead to serious problems in communication. In this paper, we discuss the causes of accuracy mismatch case 1. We find that there are six features of accuracy mismatch between a back-translated sentence and its target-translated sentence. View full abstract»

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  • The Role of Movies and Telephony in the History of Communication Media

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 69 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (429 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recently various types of new media have surfaced with surprising rapidily namely e-mails, blogs, and social networks such as Twitter and Face book. The dialogue on these media is critical yet insubstantial verging merely on negative and positive rather than an extensive study. However, few attempts have visualised the greater impact of the phenomena. In this paper, our effort is to investigate this recent communication trend by examining the history of human communication. Our empirical examination is accentuating the fact that this trend could be interpreted as a shift from logical communication to emotional communication. Simultaneously we would like to explain that this recent trend has its origin in the invention of movie and telephony in late 19th century. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Art for Non-computer People

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 74 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1010 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is common to introduce computer art to people with a background about computer science or art. However, the rising importance of computer-based creativity demands methods of talking about computer art to people who have no professional experience in any of these fields. This paper describes and evaluates "Vanishing Point" computer art workshop, designed both for children and adults with small or no computer user experience. The aim of the workshop was to present in a simple way possibilities of computer technology and advantages offered by open source software in artistic use. The workshop description and reflection are structured according to "Computer art for computer people- a syllabus" (1977) by Grace C. Hartlein. The "Vanishing Point" workshop description combined with this early paper about computer art dissemination allows for a reflective point of view on computer-based creativity in the last thirty years and its practitioners according to their familiarity with computer art. View full abstract»

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  • The Three Phases of Life: An Inter-cultural Perspective

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 80 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a new direction of research in entertainment computing. The problem addressed is drawing on results from different disciplines: anthropology, sociology, design, and engineering sciences. Starting with the three divine concepts in Hinduism (Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva) each individual human life on earth can be divided into three main phases: (1) childhood, (2) adolescence, and (3) retirement. Each of these phases is specified and characterized by the following main motive complexes: (1) love, (2) power and (3) death. In the Greek mythology the trilogy of Oedipus introduced and discussed already these relationships. In the last century three main psycho-analytical schools concentrate on each of these primary motive complexes: (1) S. Freud on love/libido, (2) A. Adler on power and autonomy, and (3) C.G. Jung on death and transcendence. This paper describes these relationships and discusses the possible contributions of entertainment technology (i.e. Life Action Role Playing) in supporting the two main transitions in each human life between these three phases. Hence cultural computing is based on a form of cultural translation that uses scientific methods to capture and represent essential aspects of a particular culture to support cultural development. View full abstract»

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  • Towards Preserving Indigenous Oral Stories Using Tangible Objects

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 86 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (504 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Handcrafted beadwork produced by the BaNtwane people of South Africa is loaded with meaning. Communicating indigenous oral stories is important for passing on culture-specific traditions and community memory, such as the meaning of the handcrafted beadwork. Oral stories are told within the physical confines of the community. The community we focus on in this paper suffers from younger generations moving away physically, start preferring the English language over their mother tongue and digital over oral communication, and therefore this co-located storytelling process is interrupted. As part of the Story Beads project we have created an interactive system that incorporates a combination of physical objects and modern technology for recording and replaying oral stories that can help preserve the meaning of the handcrafted beadwork of the BaNtwane people. View full abstract»

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