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Interactive Collaborative Learning (ICL), 2011 14th International Conference on

Date 21-23 Sept. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 133
  • [Title page]

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • Author index

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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  • Evaluation in lifelong learning

    Page(s): 1 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (92 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Lifelong learning is a worldwide practice. It supposes another approach to learning and, consequently, to evaluation. In the present paper differences between traditional and lifelong learning are presented, and reasons to another type of evaluation are outlined. Lifelong learning offers a waste amount of assessment tools that aimed to develop individuals and increase their motivation. As an example of competence assessment with alternative assessment tools, one model of competence assessment of an information scientist is given in the present article. View full abstract»

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  • The set-up and implementation of fully virtualized lessons with an automated workflow utilizing VMC/Moodle at the Medical University of Graz

    Page(s): 5 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1309 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With start of winter semester 2010/11 the Medical University of Graz (MUG) successfully introduced a new primary learning management system (LMS) Moodle. Moodle currently serves more than 4,300 students from three studies and holds more than 7,500 unique learning objects. With begin of the summer semester 2010 we decided to start a pilot with Moodle and 430 students. For the pilot we migrated the learning content of one module and two optional subjects to Moodle. The evaluation results were extremely promising - more than 92% of the students wanted immediately Moodle - also Moodle did meet our high expectations in terms of performance and scalability. Within this paper we describe how we defined and set-up a scalable and highly available platform for hosting Moodle and extended it by the functionality for fully automated virtual lessons. We state our experiences and give valuable clues for universities and institutions who want to introduce Moodle in the near future. View full abstract»

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  • The introduction of a new virtual microscope into the eLearning platform of the Medical University of Graz

    Page(s): 10 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2030 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In 2002 the Medical University of Graz (MUG) introduced its first Learning Management System (LMS). One of the first applications developed was a virtual microscope 1.0 (VM 1.0) to be used by students via a standard web browser. The basic idea was to offer the functionality of a microscope via an interactive application which is integrated within the LMS. The main advantages of that concept were saving costs, enhancing the flexibility for students and utilizing additional features and possibilities offered by new media. Cost saving was achieved by replacing hundreds of expensive physical microscopes by the virtual microscope, which can be used on any PC with a standard web browser. After more than 8 years the technology as well as the functionality of the VM 1.0 was now out-dated. We describe the stages to introduce a VM 2.0 within VMC/Moodle in order to help other universities who want to introduce a VM for their students to speed up the decision process and to avoid possible traps. View full abstract»

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  • eLearn central - the journey to e-learning

    Page(s): 16 - 23
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  • Dynamic tools in mathematical education

    Page(s): 24 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (407 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Theory of free-form curves constitutes an important theoretical part of the geometric core of computer graphics and computer aided geometric modeling and design. Engineering students often deal with these structures and their practical applications in different fields of technical sciences without full and proper understanding of all basic concepts. Several examples of demonstration applets are presented for illustration of basic properties of three types of free-form curves and their rational equivalents, which are most frequently appearing in menus of commonly available CAGD systems used in mechanical engineering practice, as Ferguson-Overhauser curve, Bézier cubic and Coons B-spline cubic. These instructional materials were produced in the dynamic mathematical software GeoGebra, and they are available as self-standing web-based dynamic applications for free usage in several on-line databases of e-learning materials. View full abstract»

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  • How to improve listening skills for technical students

    Page(s): 30 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Communication competence includes four main activities: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Listening is the most difficult skill for many of our students. But that of the time a person is engaged in communication, approximately 9% is devoted to writing, 16% to reading, 30% to speaking, and 45% to listening. That's why for non-linguistic universities the perfection and development of the speech learning procedure becomes actual especially when we use academic hours of student independent work (self-study) for this purpose. View full abstract»

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  • Architecture based prototypes for mobile collaborative learning (MCL) to improve pedagogical activities

    Page(s): 32 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (858 KB)  

    Deployment of new emerging technologies have attracted and motivated a great deal of attention from researchers and scientist in various disciplines to develop and design the learning management systems, virtual learning environments and conference systems with support of MCL for education and other organizations. This technological revolution of connecting large numbers of potential learners through mobile telephony creates new challenges for developing the new architectures for education and business. Some of the MCL paradigms are proposed and implemented in various fields such as university, corporate, health and military but they lack completeness. This paper introduces new server and client side architectural based prototypes with support of various working components, which help the users in obtaining the contents from server to meet the pedagogical requirements. This paper has also proposed and integrated the features of content-server with cache-server to provide the faster delivery of contents for MCL. Finally, The paper proposes and implements some features of a novel “group application” to support asynchronous and synchronous and multimodal features to facilitate the students for MCL. This contribution will encourage and motivate the students to pursue their education again because the students will be able to get the course contents at anytime and anywhere. View full abstract»

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  • Technology enhanced learning for programming courses — Experiences and comparison

    Page(s): 42 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (95 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Methods and approaches behind technology enhanced learning (TEL) in programming courses at a university level encourage continuous research in the last 20 years. Still there is no generally applicable way that would guarantee success. In this paper some experiences gathered during years of a technology-enhanced approach in teaching programming at two universities in two countries are presented and compared. View full abstract»

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  • AVATAR course: Teacher training for teaching in 3D virtual worlds

    Page(s): 46 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (74 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we outline a global course for teachers, which was delivered remotely over a period of four months. The course was created in English language, however to support the learning curve of multilingual and international groups, several modules were moderated in national groups. The course has nine modules, distributed via e-learning and v-learning platform. Last module supports creation of new teaching material by course participants and its piloting with their students. Teachers created interdisciplinary lesson plans with activities in the 3D virtual worlds. Recommendations and experience from trials are tabled in conclusions. View full abstract»

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  • A qualitative approach towards discovering microblogging practices of scientists

    Page(s): 51 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although Microblogging (for instance Twitter) is still rather young compared to other traditional weblogging services there already exists quite a number of studies on its usage. The majority of scholars dealing with this topic have chosen a quantitative approach focusing on different aspects such as publishing patterns, follower patterns, publishing practices, etc. However, there are less qualitative evidence and case studies on how Twitter is used by adults in their personal working practices. This paper presents a qualitative approach of discovering microblogging practices and obtaining rich descriptions of few cases that give a deeper insight into how Twitter is used by scientists and how this practice shapes their social networks. The methodological approach is based on online ethnographic studies. Therefore Grabeeter, a tool for collecting all public tweets of a person in various formats, has been adapted in order to obtain the data appropriate for a qualitative analysis following a grounded theory approach. After an analysis of the current state-of-the-art we will outline an approach for a more qualitative analysis that focuses on discovering tacit aspects of microblogging practices such as value or purpose. Finally some initial results from four individual cases will be discussed. This work presents the initial phase of a detailed qualitative approach towards exploring microblogging practices of scientists. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation and evaluation of a collaborative learning, training and networking environment for start-up entrepreneurs in virtual 3D worlds

    Page(s): 58 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (466 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Exchange of knowledge and ideas, building up a social network and gaining the specific expertise are the first most important steps before starting an own business or enterprise. Business incubator programs and also university innovation courses try to provide these services and impart the according knowledge to start-up entrepreneurs. Especially for potential entrepreneurs already in workforce who want to study further it is hard to find time for training sessions or workshops offered by incubators. Virtual 3D Worlds can support the needs of start-up entrepreneurs who cannot participate at local meetings, so that they can build up social contacts to peers, experts and also to potential financiers, but have also the possibility to participate in virtual seminars and workshops to gain the required knowledge. This paper focuses on identifying advantages of using Virtual 3D Worlds to enhance the imparting of the required expertise to start a business and points out ways to improve learning effects. Within this framework a Virtual 3D World especially for incubation services is implemented followed by an evaluation by students, domain experts and also pedagogical and cognitive science experts. Two different and independent studies were used to identify issues and potentials of the designed Virtual Incubator World and should also help to generalize the findings to the field of research. View full abstract»

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  • Assessment of usability benchmarks: Combining standardized scales with specific questions

    Page(s): 67 - 75
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (106 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The usability of Web sites and online services is of rising importance. When creating a completely new Web site, qualitative data are adequate for identifying the most usability problems. However, changes of an existing Web site should be evaluated by a quantitative benchmarking process. The proposed paper describes the creation of a questionnaire that allows a quantitative usability benchmarking, i.e. a direct comparison of the different versions of a Web site and an orientation on general standards of usability. The questionnaire is also open for qualitative data. The methodology will be explained by the digital library services of the ZBW. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic analysis of messages in discussion forums

    Page(s): 76 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (930 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a study aimed at investigating on whether the text mining technique using graphs can be used to analyze the relevance of the messages in online forums. Experiments were carried out with a program that calculates the thematic relevance of text contributions. In addition, the paper presents results found in the automatic analysis obtained by the application of the software. View full abstract»

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  • Foreign language learning environment built on web 2.0 technologies

    Page(s): 82 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (592 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Modern educational approaches and the widespread use of new technologies, as well as the adoption of social software services in our daily lives, require new e-education approaches. Web 2.0 technologies and services represent promising learning tools that support information sharing, communication, networking and collaboration, which transcend time and space, linking individuals in various and vast groups of networked participants. Also, tools and services must be easy to integrate and adapt to the specific needs of various learning settings. These advantages, paired with greater flexibility and lower costs for developing countries have motivated research to support second language learning and training. The prototype implementation presented in this work is based on the Liferay platform, which incorporates various social network tools and subject domain applications in a very flexible way that promotes learning communities and closed learning groups. Preliminary findings from both the development and usage points of views are promising. This paper outlines system requirements, discusses the development process and provides an overview of its usage for different groups of users. View full abstract»

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  • Case studies of assessment ePortfolios

    Page(s): 89 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (433 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In an online learning environment it is important to select an effective way of presenting the artifacts that are created by students who perform various course related assignments. In this paper the authors discuss the features of ePortfolio systems, adoption strategies and other issues that are relevant for the effective use of an ePortfolio as an educational tool. However, the focus of the paper is on practical experiences in the use of an ePortfolio system for presentation of students' artifacts and assessment of their work. Two case studies of ePortfolio usage for assessment purposes are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Common problems of mobile applications for foreign language testing

    Page(s): 95 - 97
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1711 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the use of mobile learning educational applications has become more common anywhere in the world, new concerns have appeared in the classroom, human interaction in software engineering and ergonomics. New tests of foreign languages for a number of purposes have become more and more common recently. However, studies interrelating language tests and ergonomics have lagged behind to the point that there is a clear lack of balance between software for m-learning and the capacities of modern equipment. This paper is based on the experience acquired through the use of mobile phones emulators for language testing. The paper does not deal with the experimental phase itself but suggests the constraints found in such experimentation from a descriptive perspective. View full abstract»

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  • Remote laboratory for advanced servo control of electric machines

    Page(s): 98 - 101
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (88 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Remote laboratories are typically used for having remote access to physical laboratory facilities. In the setup presented in this paper that has not been the main objective, the remote laboratory presented here is used mainly for the following two purposes: First, to create a controlled environment where unwanted side activities like hardware setup, driver problems, troubleshooting faulty components, and struggles with special software for configuring DSP systems, are removed as much as possible, in order for the students to have their full focus on the tasks that relevant in the module: modeling of non-linear systems, synthetisation of controllers, and stability and performance analysis. Second, to significantly reduce the setup and maintenance cost associated with complex laboratory setups involving DSPs and expensive hardware. View full abstract»

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  • Using computer aided language software for teaching and self-learning

    Page(s): 102 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (378 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this modern age of technology advancement, the computers have played a pivotal role in bringing a revolution to all the fields including teaching and learning. Learning a new programming language is not an easy task as beginners often face problems in understanding the syntax, semantics and logic of the new language. Books are not sufficient to clear concepts and some alternate methods of learning are required. As Computer Aided Learning Software (CALS) has proven to improve the teaching and learning process, therefore, we propose software, “Programming Teaching Aid”, which facilitates teachers as well as self-learners to learn a new language. It has an easy to use graphical user interface (GUI) which helps the user in understanding a pre-written code to be learnt or understood. The language being focused is C++. The proposed software truly supports the pedagogical methodologies. The use of this software will make the learning of C++ language more effective and instill self-study skills among students. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching strategies for direct and indirect instruction in teaching engineering

    Page(s): 107 - 114
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (266 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is important to select the proper instructional strategy for a specific learning outcome in teaching engineering. There are two broad types of learning outcomes: facts, rules and action sequences (on lower levels of complexity in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains), and concepts, patterns and abstractions (on higher level of complexity in the above named domains). Facts, rules and action sequences are taught using instructional strategies of direct instruction. Concepts, patterns and abstractions are taught using strategies of indirect instruction. Strategies of both types of learning may be combined, providing a menu of teaching strategies that help students solve problems, think critically and work cooperatively. This article presents teaching strategies suitable for direct and indirect instruction used in teaching engineering. View full abstract»

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  • E-learning at the Department of Languages of FEI STU

    Page(s): 115 - 118
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (66 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In m paper would like to give an overview of e-learning at the department of Languages of FEI STU and inform about practical experience we have had till now as well as feedback we have received from our students so far. View full abstract»

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  • Use of electronic discussions as a pedagogical tool

    Page(s): 122 - 125
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The following describes a study using an asynchronous discussion tool to facilitate a scientific discussion among students. The idea is that the students gather information and think critically about topics relevant for their studies, and also that the debate form the basis for a larger project work. Feedback from the students was elicited using a survey and informal feedback orally during group sessions. Although the students are reluctant to express strong opinions in front of their fellow students, the use of asynchronous discussion tools to gain insight into a new field worked quite well. As a starting point for project work the use of asynchronous discussion tools were on the other hand felt as ineffective by the students. In a future study the authors suggest that giving better explanations to what a scientific discussion is and giving multiple separate deadlines for their forum postings will improve the effectiveness. View full abstract»

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