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Requirements Patterns (RePa), 2011 First International Workshop on

Date 29-29 Aug. 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): i
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  • 2011 First International Workshop on Requirements Patterns

    Page(s): ii - iii
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  • Exactly the information your subcontractor needs: DeSyRe — Decomposing system requirements

    Page(s): 1 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (778 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In software systems development, the increasing size and complexity of systems is handled by decomposition. Companies additionally sign up different subcontractors for subsystems. For distributed development and smooth integration, a major challenge is to deduce subsystem specifications from system specifications in order to deliver them to the subcontractors. View full abstract»

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  • Analysing security requirements patterns based on problems decomposition and composition

    Page(s): 11 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (402 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Security requirements analysis for business information systems in today's networked organization is difficult due to the complexity of the systems and the frequent change in the environment. Thus, it requires security knowledge to be explicitly represented, and well understood by system analysts and designer, which in turn being applied in feasible problem contexts. System requirements are often represented in modelling frameworks with different analytical focus, so security requirements knowledge shall reflect such difference and form an integrated treatment. This paper proposes to use modelling concepts from the i* and PF modeling language to capture recurring patterns of security problems. The main concepts used are actors, assets, and relations such as ownership and permissions. The major contribution of the approach is proposing the specific problem frames such as ownership, authorization, attack and protection, by decomposing a large problem into sub-problems (base frames), then evaluate the potential threats (attacking frames) applicable to each sub-problem by evaluate the compatibility of the two, security analysis is integrated into the system design process from the outset. The proposal can be generalized to the design of defensive measures as well as other NFR treatments. View full abstract»

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  • A pattern language for evolving scenarios into multi-perspective models for requirements specification

    Page(s): 21 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scenarios have been widely used for discovering requirements in requirements engineering. Yet, requirements directly obtained from scenarios are often incomplete and inaccurate due to their inherent limitations. This paper presents a pattern language which takes a scenario obtained in the early stages of requirements analysis and transforms it into a rich set of multi-perspective models. These models respectively represent the process behavior, object behavior, agent behavior, and intentional goal of the scenario. Collectively, these models aim to provide a more complete and accurate requirements specification than the original scenario description. The transformation of these models is performed by a sequence of four patterns: establishing the story line, elaborating things that change, identifying agents and their interactions, and unraveling the goal and its subgoals. The scope of the transformation is defined by a fundamental structure (a meta-model) shared by scenarios used for cognition as well as for requirements discovery. The pattern language intends to provide a systematical approach for transforming scenarios into requirements specification models. View full abstract»

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  • Pay to play or requirements prioritization in collectives

    Page(s): 28 - 31
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    This paper presents two patterns for requirements prioritization in a collective. A collective is a group of stakeholders with a common need. The stakeholders join the collective to create an infrastructure that they can leverage to develop their own products more effectively. This new organizational model differs from the traditional value chain, and changes the way requirements are identified and prioritized. View full abstract»

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  • Capturing transparency-related requirements patterns through argumentation

    Page(s): 32 - 41
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    Transparency is a critical concern to democratic societies. As software permeates our social lives, Software Transparency is becoming a quality criterion that demands more attention from software developers. We present in this paper our approach to capture transparency-related requirements patterns through argumentation. We represented initial transparency knowledge as requirements patterns. These initial patterns stimulated stakeholders' arguments on an open discussion about transparency of a given software. We apply an argumentation framework to capture the stakeholders' arguments on argumentation graphs. Transparency-related requirements patterns are identified by formally analyzing consensus on the argumentation graph. Basically, the identified patterns are possible operationalizations to transparency-related softgoals. View full abstract»

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  • Towards a generalised framework for classifying and retrieving requirements patterns

    Page(s): 42 - 51
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    Reuse has received much attention in the Software Engineering literature [1], primarily as a means of improving software quality while minimising the financial and temporal costs of software development. Within requirements engineering, various approaches have been proposed to requirements reuse. However, there is huge variation in the contents, form and intended purpose of these reusable requirements. If these patterns are to be useful in practice, it will be necessary to provide a common framework of reference through which these patterns can be accessed. In this paper, we propose a generalised framework to support the organisation of requirements patterns on three levels: the RE task supported by the pattern, the problem domain addressed, and the level of technical detail provided. View full abstract»

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  • Author index

    Page(s): 52
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