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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • In the Hot Zone [Back Story]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 4
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 6
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  • From Three Mile Island to Fukushima Daiichi [Spectral Lines]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 8 - 12
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  • Africa powers up [News]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 13 - 14
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  • Can we hack the van allen belts? [News]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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  • The rise of the monolithic 3-D chip [News]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 18 - 19
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  • The medical X-ray's new phase

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 20
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  • Icarus revisited [The Big Picture]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 22 - 23
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  • The big time: build a giant version of the 555 Timer IC [Resources_Hands On]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 25 - 26
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  • In search of NwAvGuy: an audio engineer created spectacular diy designs– and then vanished [Resources_Geek Life]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 27 - 28
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  • The answer machine: who is the crowd? [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 30
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  • Lasers light up the silver screen

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 32 - 39
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    When was the last time you saw a movie in a theater? Three months ago? A year? Longer than that? · That's the problem. The movie industry is among the world's most important businesses. The Motion Picture Association of America says that films produced in the United States alone pulled in US $34.7 billion in worldwide box-office revenues in 2012. And yet the industry is beset by a dismaying trend: More and more, people are watching movies on their laptops, tablets, and smartphones. In wealthy countries, middle-class homes are now typically outfitted with huge flat-panel TVs and powerful surround-sound audio systems. The upshot is that for many people, particularly middle-aged ones, a trip to a movie theater is becoming a rare event, if not an increasingly distant memory. View full abstract»

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  • How do you store a digital movie for 100 years?

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 40 - 44
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    Think about your favorite movie: Is it a classic, like Citizen Kane? Maybe it's something from the French New Wave, such as Jules and Jim. Or perhaps it's a contemporary blockbuster, like Avatar. Now imagine that movie just disappeared, and you could never watch it again on the big screen. · You don't need to worry about anything like that happening at the moment because the major movie studios go to great lengths to protect their treasures. They can do this efficiently and inexpensively for one reason: Photochemical film is cheap and easy to preserve. All you need is a cold room that's not too humid and not too dry, and the chemically processed film will last for 100 years or longer. Film archivists know that because many works from the earliest days of motion pictures, produced in the first decade of the 20th century or even before, are still around. Centuries from now, it'll be easy enough to retrieve whats stored on such films-a process that requires little more than a light source and a lens- even if information about how exactly those movies were made is lost. View full abstract»

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  • Fukushima's next 40 years

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 46 - 53
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    Aradiation-proof superhero could make sense of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in an afternoon. Our champion would pick through the rubble to reactor 1, slosh through the pooled water inside the building, lift the massive steel dome of the protective containment vessel, and peek into the pressure vessel that holds the nuclear fuel. A dive to the bottom would reveal the debris of the meltdown: a hardened blob of metals with fat strands of radioactive goop dripping through holes in the pressure vessel to the floor of the containment vessel below. Then, with a clear understanding of the situation, the superhero could figure out how to clean up this mess. View full abstract»

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  • Open-source drones for fun and profit

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 54 - 59
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    Friday is Fly Day at 3D Robotics, a maker of small robotic aircraft. So here we are, on a windswept, grassy landfill with a spectacular view of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, looking up at a six-prop copter with a gleaming metal frame. It's like a spiffy toy from the future. Buzzing like a swarm of bees, it lifts off smartly, hovers, then pinwheels. "Jason's making the hex twirl," says CEO Chris Anderson, a trim man in jeans and an untucked oxford shirt. "That's just for show-a human pilot couldn't do that." That's because Jason, the flight tester, did nothing more than figuratively push a button. The hexarotor-technically, the 3DR Y-6-is on autopilot, which it demonstrates by zooming off on a preprogrammed route. The Y-6 sells for US $619. That's a lot for a toy, but it's chicken feed for a capital investment. These mini unmanned aerial vehicles, a.k.a. UAVs, a.k.a. drones-are changing from toys into tools, as businesses worldwide awaken to their importance. View full abstract»

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  • The age of the zettabyte Cisco: the future of internet traffic is video [Dataflow]

    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 68
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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Editor-in-Chief
Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine