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Date July 31 2011-Aug. 3 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 101
  • Content list of 20th IEEE international symposium on robot and human interactive communication

    Page(s): 1 - 8
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Program at a glance

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Call for papers]

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Symposium digest

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Map of the conference location

    Page(s): xiii
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • History of the Ro-Man conferences

    Page(s): viii
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • General information

    Page(s): x - xi
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  • Map of the vicinity of the Ro-Man conference

    Page(s): xii
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Organizing committee

    Page(s): v
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  • Anthropomatics - the science of building smart artifacts for humans

    Page(s): xviii - xix
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    Anthropomatics addresses the symbiosis between humans and machines, focusing on a deeper understanding of the cooperation, interaction and coexistence between humans and machines stimulating and strengthen advanced and deep research in response to the challenges of increasingly smart environments and multimodal access to various complex technical systems. At KIT the Focus Anthropomatics and Robotics - APR has been set up by a number of research groups focusing on the research field of Anthropomatics and Robotics with more than 250 researchers. Modelling humans and their capabilities requires a deep understanding of the principle of biomechanics and kinematics, as well as the underlaying neural control principles and the perceptive and actuatoric system. Modelling and understanding of the sensomotoric mechanisms, learning and developement of skills and cognititve capabilities to enable humans to interact with the world is of high importance to design technical systems operating closely and interactively with humans via various modalities like speech, haptics, vision, grasping and locomotion. Typical research fields are related to active vision, interpretation of scenes and human activities, recognition and tracking technologies multimodal & perceptual user interfaces, understanding and translation of speech. Complementary research needed is related to the retrieval & access and summarization of multimedia data sources, translation of spoken text, context aware learning computers, implicit services and many more. The robotics application field ranges from interactive industrial robotics, service robotic companions, humanoids and medical robotics. In all domains the integrating aspects are focusing on algorithms processing real word data as well as open self-organizing architectures which allow autonomy, skill and task learning as well as interaction with humans. Our research emphasizes the critical path from basic understanding of cognitive processes and ro- otics foundations to applications in various domains. The research includes new approaches to sensor and actuator methodologies, foundations of machine perception, motion and action planning algorithms, simulation and computer graphics, robot machine learning, speech recognition and understanding, multimodal man-machine interaction, and many others. APR addresses the needs of humans in smart living environments and robotics focusing on both, basic foundations and applications. The focus has an intellectual center point on Anthropomatics and a commitment to Robotics as a new human centered discipline. The research is to explore new ideas and to build systematically systems which reflect human daily needs and a basic understanding of intelligent robots and adaptive safe system behaviour in general. Such cognitive robots are able to do tasks skillfully and efficiently together with humans, and they should be able to operate in dangerous or inaccessible areas. Furthermore, future robots should discover new things and learn new capabilities and knowledge about their environment and they should be able to reason about the effects of their actions and interventions. Thus, the basic capabilities to perform intelligent actions in the real world are perception, cognition, locomotion and skillful manipulation. The humanoid robot series ARMAR is used to illustrate recent research and achieved results in the field. View full abstract»

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  • Human-robot interaction in the wild: Land, marine, and aerial robots at Fukushima and Sendai

    Page(s): xx
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    Summary form only given. TMA was established in 1997 as an R&D software outsourcing company, and has grown from a small group of 6 engineers in 1997, to over 1000 people today, serving many large customers around the world. In 2009, when TMA celebrated the first 12-year cycle, as part of the development strategy for the next cycle, we embarked on a new imitative to set up an R&D center to leverage the human and financial capital we have accumulated from R&D outsourcing, and the infrastructure we have built, to research and develop IT-enabled applications. The emphasis is on applications, based on ideas from ourselves, and from our partners around the world. This presentation will share with you the achievements, the lessons learned, and the call for collaboration. View full abstract»

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  • Deployment of personal service robots for education and task services

    Page(s): xxi
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    Summary form only given. Every day, organizations accumulate data from a variety of sources. Successful organizations fuel their strategic decision making with insights from data mining. Through data mining, they are building predictive and descriptive models by uncovering trends and patterns in vast amounts of data. But much can wrong in the data mining process, even for trained professionals. In this talk, we'll discusses case studies from a range of industries to illustrate the potential dangers and mistakes that can frustrate problem-solving and discovery - and that can unnecessarily waste resources. View full abstract»

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  • Program Committee / reviewers

    Page(s): 1
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  • Social events

    Page(s): xv
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  • Sponsorships

    Page(s): ix
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  • Standing steering committee

    Page(s): vi
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  • Map for the MARTA transit / subway system

    Page(s): xiv
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  • Developing skin-based technologies for interactive robots - challenges in design, development and the possible integration in therapeutic environments

    Page(s): xxii - xxiii
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    Summary form only given. Scaled technologies continue to exhibit variability, driven by both random process effects and systematic structural effects. Process and design rule actions can be taken to reduce, or even eliminate, sources of systematic variability. Random variability is more difficult to combat, but architectural decisions can be made to limit the device sensitivity to specific random effects. A review of several current sources of technology variability is presented, and the impacts to the overall technology offering are assessed. View full abstract»

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  • Welcome address for the general chair and the program chair

    Page(s): iii
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  • Effect of human guidance and state space size on Interactive Reinforcement Learning

    Page(s): 1 - 6
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (755 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Interactive Reinforcement Learning algorithm enables a human user to train a robot by providing rewards in response to past actions and anticipatory guidance to guide the selection of future actions. Past work with software agents has shown that incorporating user guidance into the policy learning process through Interactive Reinforcement Learning significantly improves the policy learning time by reducing the number of states the agent explores. We present the first study of Interactive Reinforcement Learning in real-world robotic systems. We report on four experiments that study the effects that teacher guidance and state space size have on policy learning performance. We discuss modifications made to apply Interactive Reinforcement Learning to a real-world system and show that guidance significantly reduces the learning rate, and that its positive effects increase with state space size. View full abstract»

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  • Saliency-based boundary object detection in naturally complex scenes

    Page(s): 407 - 412
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (466 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A stochastic scheme is presented for cooperative detection of landmark objects distributed in roadway boundaries. By indexing chromatic diversity within a locally Gaussian color space, saliency patterns are extracted with respect to the as-is primary system. Through saccadic scan of the saliency patterns, boundary objects are successively articulated into a system of fractal attractors consistent with the ground-object structure. As the result, the fractal model is indicated within the perspective of the naturally complex scenes. View full abstract»

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  • How to walk a robot: A dog-leash human-robot interface

    Page(s): 376 - 382
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1163 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human-robot interaction (HRI) tasks in everyday environments will require people to direct or lead a robot as they walk in close proximity to it. Tasks that exemplify this interaction include a robotic porter, carrying heavy suitcases, or a robot carrying groceries. As many users may not be robotics experts, we argue that such interaction schemes must be accessible, easy to use and understand. In this paper, we present a dog-leash interface that enables a person to lead a robot simply by holding the leash, following a dog-leash interaction metaphor. We introduce variants on dog-leash robotic interaction, present our original interface implementation, and detail our formal qualitative evaluation, exploring how users perceive and accept the dog leash robotic interaction. View full abstract»

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  • A behavior combination generating method for reflecting emotional probabilities using simulated annealing algorithm

    Page(s): 192 - 197
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (605 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a behavior generating method for reflecting emotional probabilities. The proposed method consists of two processes: an emotion-behavior probability generating process and a unit behavior combination generating process. 1) In the emotion-behavior probability generating process, the emotional probabilities of behaviors are determined on the basis of user preferences in terms of the priorities of emotions. 2) In the unit behavior combination generating process, optimal behaviors are found by the simulated annealing algorithm. A final behavior is a set of selected parts of expressions. It is possible to not only reveal an abundance of expressions without one-to-one mapping relations between emotions and behaviors but also apply these expressions in the case of various robots. We have verified the diversity of emotional expression by applying the proposed method to two different robot systems, which are a cyber robot simulator and a real robot system. View full abstract»

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  • Multimodal controls for soldier/swarm interaction

    Page(s): 223 - 228
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (454 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In theory, autonomous robotic swarms can be used for critical Army tasks, including accompanying vehicle convoys to provide security and enhance situational awareness. However, the Soldier providing swarm supervisory control must be able to correct swarm actions, especially in disrupted or degraded conditions. Dynamic map displays are visual interfaces that can be useful for swarm supervisory control tasks, because they can show the spatial positions of objects of interest (e.g., people, robots, swarm members, and vehicles), at different locations (e.g., on roads and intersections), while allowing user commands as well as world changes, often in real time. In this study, multimodal speech and touch controls were designed for a U.S. Army Research Laboratory dynamic map display to allow users to provide supervisory control of a simulated robotic swarm. This experiment explored the use of sequential multimodal touch and speech commands for placement of swarm-related map objects at different map locations. The criterion variable was temporal binding, the time between the onset of each command in the sequence, relative to the system's ability to fuse the two sequential commands into a unitary response. User preference of modality for the first command was also measured. These concepts were tested in a laboratory study using 12 male Marine volunteers with a mean age of 19 years. Results indicated significant differences in temporal binding for different map objects and map locations. Additionally, nine out of 12 Marines used speech commands approximately 75% or more of the time, while the remaining three Marines used touch commands first approximately 75% or more of the time. Temporal binding was significantly shorter for touch-first than for speech-first commands. Suggestions for future research and future applications to robotic command and control systems are described. View full abstract»

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  • Recognizing situations that demand trust

    Page(s): 7 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article presents an investigation into the theoretical and computational aspects of trust as applied to robots. It begins with an in-depth review of the trust literature in search of a definition for trust suitable for implementation on a robot. Next we apply the definition to our interdependence framework for social action selection and develop an algorithm for determining if an interaction demands trust on the part of the robot. Finally, we apply our algorithm to several canonical social situations and review the resulting indications of whether or not the situation demands trust. View full abstract»

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