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World Haptics Conference (WHC), 2011 IEEE

Date 21-24 June 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 127
  • [Copyright notice]

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  • Message from the general chair

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  • Supporting organizations

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  • IEEE Technical Committee on Haptics (TCH)

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  • International Organizing Committee

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  • Steering Commitee

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  • Reviewers

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  • Surface haptics: Virtual touch on physical surfaces

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  • Haptic human - robot collaboration

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  • Systematic evaluation methodology and performance metrics for haptic interfaces

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  • IEEE transactions on haptics call for papers special issue on haptic Human-Robot interaction

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  • Message from the chair

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  • Call for participation

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  • Sensorimotor testing in children

    Page(s): 1 - 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (329 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This preliminary study investigated behaviorally the performance of a sample of young twins in a set of classical visuomotor tasks. The assessment was carried out using a small haptic interface used to produce force and record the hand trajectory during the execution of tasks requiring rapid and precise movements. The aim of the study was to evaluate the sensorimotor development across a wide age-range (6-13 years) in which dramatic changes in sensorimotor integration and motor skills occur. A mixed-effect analysis was performed in order to evaluate age-related effects and to check for reduction of residual variability within twins with respect to variability across all pairs of twins. We report both an effect of age and of parenthood when considering reaction times and control of position of the hand under perturbed environment. The ability of tracking a moving target and the velocity of information processing show a dependence on age but not on the parenthood factor. This study validates the methodology used to investigate the age effects on the motor behavior of children and promises to provide new insights in twin-studies. View full abstract»

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  • Haptic simulation of needle and probe interaction with tissue for prostate brachytherapy training

    Page(s): 7 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a haptic simulator for prostate brachytherapy. Both needle insertion and the manipulation of the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe are controlled via haptic devices. These are used to render tissue interaction forces computed using a deformable tissue model based on the finite element method (FEM). Needle flexibility and lateral needle bevel forces are also simulated. The TRUS-tissue simulation allows a trainee to practice the 3D intra-operative placement of the TRUS probe for registration with the pre-operative volume study. The needle-tissue simulation allows a trainee to practice needle insertion and targeting. The TRUS probe and the needle can be maneuvered simultaneously. Approaches to computational acceleration for real-time haptic performance are presented. Trade-offs between accuracy and speed are discussed. A graphics-card implementation of the numerically intensive mesh-adaptation operation is also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Discriminating tissue stiffness with a haptic catheter: Feeling the inside of the beating heart

    Page(s): 13 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (527 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Catheter devices allow physicians to access the inside of the human body easily and painlessly through natural orifices and vessels. Although catheters allow for the delivery of fluids and drugs, the deployment of devices, and the acquisition of the measurements, they do not allow clinicians to assess the physical properties of tissue inside the body due to the tissue motion and transmission limitations of the catheter devices, including compliance, friction, and backlash. The goal of this research is to increase the tactile information available to physicians during catheter procedures by providing haptic feedback during palpation procedures. To accomplish this goal, we have developed the first motion compensated actuated catheter system that enables haptic perception of fast moving tissue structures. The actuated catheter is instrumented with a distal tip force sensor and a force feedback interface that allows users to adjust the position of the catheter while experiencing the forces on the catheter tip. The efficacy of this device and interface is evaluated through a psychophyisical study comparing how accurately users can differentiate various materials attached to a cardiac motion simulator using the haptic device and a conventional manual catheter. The results demonstrate that haptics improves a user's ability to differentiate material properties and decreases the total number of errors by 50% over the manual catheter system. View full abstract»

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  • Informing haptic feedback design for gait retraining

    Page(s): 19 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (703 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Gait retraining, a promising treatment for knee osteoarthritis, requires the modification of three separate joint motions. In this paper we present the results of three studies to inform the design of a wearable haptic feedback system for this application. The first study motivates our choice of feedback modality for each of the motions. The latter two studies explore how to present haptic feedback to train three different motions concurrently. When feedback is presented simultaneously, subjects have poor perception of three or more haptic cues, tend to focus on only one motion at a time, and require several steps to modify all three motions. These findings suggest that vibrational feedback should be presented one joint at a time for haptic gait retraining. View full abstract»

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  • On the 1/f noise and non-integer harmonic decay of the interaction of a finger sliding on flat and sinusoidal surfaces

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1531 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Fluctuations of the frictional force arising from the stroke of a finger against flat and sinusoidal surfaces are studied. A custom-made high-resolution friction force sensor, able to resolve milli-newton forces, was used to record those fluctuations as well as the net, low-frequency components of the interaction force. Measurements show that the fluctuations of the sliding force are highly non-stationary. Despite their randomness, force spectra averages reveal regularities. With a smooth, flat, but not mirror-finish, surface the background noise follows a 1/f trend. Recordings made with pure-tone sinusoidal gratings reveal complexities in the interaction between a finger and a surface. The fundamental frequency is driven by the periodicity of the gratings and harmonics follow a non-integer power-law decay that suggests strong nonlinearities in the fingertip interaction. The results are consistent with the existence of a multiplicity of simultaneous and rapid stick-slip relaxation oscillations. Results have implications for high fidelity haptic rendering and biotribology. View full abstract»

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  • Design of a SMA actuated 2-DoF tactile device for displaying tangential skin displacement

    Page(s): 31 - 36
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    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Tangential skin displacement at the fingertip is an effective means of communicating direction or displaying static friction in haptic application. A tactile device capable of stretching the skin of the fingerpad can be mounted directly on the fingertip or embedded in haptic interfaces and hand-held devices. In both cases low weight and small dimensions are important requirements. We have developed a miniaturized tactile device capable of displaying tangential skin displacement in two directions. The actuation for the device is realized by SMA wires, in order to reduce bulk and weight, and the displacements are measured by optical sensors. The performance of the device has been verified experimentally. View full abstract»

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  • TAXEL: Initial progress toward self-morphing visio-haptic interface

    Page(s): 37 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1486 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a new interactive interface TAXEL, which aims at developing a reconfigurable self-morphing visio-haptic interface. We first present the overall architecture and concept of a self-morphing visuo-haptic interface. Key hardware components are developed and tested, including three tactile actuators using a piezoelectric active linear actuator, a passive MR fluid actuator, and a thin film-type actuator, respectively, and a flexible visual display based on the light-waveguide technology. Using the developed components, a tactile platform that includes a 8×16 array of the linear actuators is implemented for a proof of concept. A rendering engine is also designed for the tactile platform with emphasis on the use of haptic feedback together with GUI. We also carried out a user study with virtual button simulation as a benchmark to evaluate the performance of the TAXEL tactile platform. Lastly, an integrated system with a visual display is demonstrated along with several application examples. View full abstract»

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  • Remote measurement of surface compliance distribution using ultrasound radiation pressure

    Page(s): 43 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (739 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose a remote measurement system of surface compliance distributions for haptic broadcasting. Our system is composed of an ultrasound phased array generating acoustic radiation pressure on the remote object surface and a laser displacement sensor. The compliance is evaluated by the ratio of the surface displacement to the applied force. We set up a system to examine the feasibility of the method. In the experiments, the distribution of the surface compliance comparable to the human skin was successfully measured for a flat object surface. View full abstract»

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  • Modulation of tactile motion by intra- and inter-modal manipulation

    Page(s): 49 - 52
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (305 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The perception of tactile motion is essential for our daily interaction with objects. Tactile motion perception has been studied by using stimuli featuring real or apparent motion. Research on tactile apparent motion has conventionally manipulated the perceived direction of the motion using 2 non-repeating or more than 2 repeating stimuli. Here, we report the modulation of perceived motion direction at different alternation rates by manipulation of the tactile stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between the left-to-right and right-to-left stimuli in 2 alternately and repeatedly presented vibrotactile stimuli generating ambiguous apparent motion (Experiment 1). The present study also reports that the perceived direction of tactile motion could be modulated by manipulation of the timing of additional static sounds even when the SOAs of the tactile stimuli are equal (Experiment 2). We discuss the temporal differences in the effects of intra- and inter-modal stimulus timing on tactile motion perception. View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing populations of SAI tactile mechanoreceptors to enable activities of daily living

    Page(s): 53 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (796 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    At present, the dense network of peripheral afferents between finger and brain and the large size of engineered sensors preclude the recreation of biologically observed afferent populations. This work uses a validated computational model of cutaneous skin and tactile afferents to evaluate sparse populations in performing tasks required in activities of daily living. Using a model (3D finite element representation of fingertip skin, linear bi-phasic transduction function, and leaky-integrate-and-fire neuronal model), we systematically varied populations of tactile receptors in dimensions of density (100, 45, 20, and 10 sensors/cm2) and size (diameter 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mm) to determine if a given modeled population can discriminate spheres and cylinders representative of objects used in activities of daily living. Using a scoring system which allows for direct comparisons between the populations, our results indicate that a population must have at least 20 sensors per cm2 to maintain response resolution in these activities of daily living and that larger-sized sensors do not degrade response resolution. View full abstract»

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