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Integrated Communications, Navigation and Surveilance Conference (ICNS), 2011

Date 10-12 May 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 135
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 9
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • [Front matter]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1 - 22
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  • 2011 ICNS conference proceedings CD help

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 1
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  • A validation study of merging and spacing techniques in a NAS-wide simulation

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): A5-1 - A5-17
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1359 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In November 2010, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) delivered a software tool to NASA Langley that models Merging and Spacing (M&S) for arrivals and departures in the Airspace Concepts Evaluation System (ACES) NAS-wide simulation. This delivery allows researchers to use ACES for system-level studies of the complex terminal airspace. As a precursor to use of the tool for research, the software was evaluated against current day arrivals in the Atlanta TRACON using Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (KATL) arrival schedules, Standard Terminal Arrival Routes (STARs), and traffic flow management (TFM) techniques typical for Atlanta. Results of this validation effort are presented describing data sets, traffic flow assumptions and techniques, and arrival rate comparisons between reported landings at Atlanta versus simulated arrivals using the same traffic sets in ACES equipped with M&S. Since emphasis for intended research is on arrival capacity, this was also the focus of the validation. Before testing began, the simulated system was expected to demonstrate superior capacity over current day Atlanta by managing spacing intervals efficiently and exactly. Initial results, instead, showed the simulation's modeled capacity to be far short of what human controllers currently achieve, despite the efficiently managed spacing. Investigation into the cause of the shortfall revealed aspects of systems-level flow and control techniques that are critical to achieving sustained high capacity in the face of varying traffic loads and type mixes. This new understanding, once applied to the current day validation model, allowed a match of Atlanta's arrival capacity as well as a better understanding of how modern airports are limited by current day route models. Following this validation effort, a sensitivity study was conducted to measure the impact of variations in system parameters on the Atlanta airport arrival capacity. View full abstract»

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  • VHF communication radio power spectra

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B1-1 - B1-5
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    The power spectral analysis of very high frequency (VHF) communication radios is important to understanding how they affect each other and how they affect VHF surveillance radios. In this paper, we propose an analytical method for lower-bound radio frequency (RF) power spectrum estimation with the consideration of both power amplifier nonlinearity and broadband noise. We then demonstrate how to apply the proposed spectral estimation method to compute the lower-bound power spectra of VHF digital link mode 2 (VDL-2), plain old ACARS (POA) and double-sideband-amplitude-modulated (DSB-AM) voice signals. Finally we present the estimated lower-bound power spectra and shed light on where the discrete spectral line component comes from and how the nonlinearity of a power amplifier leads to the spectral regrowth. View full abstract»

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  • OFDM based data link for the DLR research aircraft ATRA

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B2-1 - B2-10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (503 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper the new broadband data link radio (B-DLR), developed for the German Aerospace Center (DLR) research aircraft is presented. The link shares strong similarities with the L-band communication system L-DACS1, also partly developed at DLR. The paper presents details concerning both the design and implementation of B-DLR. This includes a description of the physical layer as well as all protocol functionalities implemented in B-DLR in a single upper layer. Additionally, details about the requirements on the hardware and software necessary in order to set up a bi-directional data transmission in real time are given. View full abstract»

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  • L-DACS1 air-to-air data-link protocol design and performance

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B3-1 - B3-14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    All advanced concepts of operation in future Air Traffic Management (ATM) assume that digital air/ground and air/air links are available. Seeking to define a future communication system suitable for planned air-to-air and air-to-ground ATM operations, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and EUROCONTROL initiated a joint study in the frame of Action Plan 17 (AP17) to investigate suitable technologies and provide recommendations to the ICAO ACP Working Group T. Two proposals for the L-band Digital Aeronautical Communication System (L-DACS) were elaborated. This paper discusses the L-DACS1 proposal, a multi-application broadband system capable of simultaneously supporting various kinds of air-to-air and air-to-ground Air Traffic Services (ATS) and Airline Operational Communications (AOC) data link services. This paper presents the research towards the design and the performance evaluation of the proposed medium access control sub-layer and logical link control sublayer of the L-DACS1 air-to-air protocol stack. The L-DACS1 air-to-air protocol has been designed for the periodic transmission of air-to-air surveillance data while supporting the transmission of a low volume of non-periodic addressed air-to-air messages. It tries to achieve this objective via a self-adaptive slotted TDMA protocol. View full abstract»

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  • Airport surface area propagation path loss in the VHF band

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B4-1 - B4-6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (937 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The wireless channel in the very high frequency (VHF) band at airport surface areas has not been quantitatively characterized in several ways. As new communication services are introduced, and as the band's spectral efficiency must be increased, a quantitative characterization of this channel will become critical for advanced wireless networking [1]. This paper describes a first step in this direction: measurement and modeling of propagation path loss in the VHF band [2]. Narrowband measurements were made in the aeronautical VHF band at Detroit Metropolitan Airport (DTW). A continuous wave (sinusoidal) signal was transmitted from existing VHF radio transmitter-receiver (RTR) sites, and a mobile receiver moved about the airport surface area in a prescribed path. Propagation path loss was computed using basic link budget analyses. Results for both line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) conditions are provided using the log-distance path loss model. The mean propagation path loss exponents are found to be approximately 5.6 and 4 for NLOS and LOS regions, respectively. Results for LOS regions also correspond to the well-known “2-ray,” or “plane-earth” model. View full abstract»

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  • Options for the Iris satellite-based datalink

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B5-1 - B5-11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (461 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Iris is the European Space Agency's programme of satellite communications for Air Traffic Management (ATM). Iris aims at designing, developing and validating a new system for air-ground safety communications within the framework of the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR) Programme, to enable operational use by 2020. The system design studies are progressing in an iterative process with projects of SESAR Joint Undertaking. Overall, the general source of requirements for applications and communication performance is the FAA/Eurocontrol COCR v2 document, but several system-level requirements are not defined yet. User requirements are being defined by SESAR JU but some of them require a better understanding of their impact on the system design before a consolidation can take place. To this end, ESA studies have been analyzing the range of options for user requirements defined by aviation, and deduced the requirements for the user terminals, the characteristics required of the communication protocols, the link budget and, consequently, determined the requirements for the space segment and the ground segment. To cope with the uncertainties linked to the future operational concept and implementation of it, variation and combination of the user requirements is considered for defining “requirements options” that are further assessed and traded-off. The present Paper provides the latest results of the analysis of these requirements options, focusing on their consequences on the system design. View full abstract»

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  • Satellite based voice communication for air traffic management and airline operation

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B6-1 - B6-10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (526 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Satellite based voice communication services today are typically provided by communication centers interconnecting ground based communication facilities with suitably equipped aircrafts. These communication services are either based on a radio operator relaying the radio calls or by connecting the call automatically to phone lines through a telephone gateway. Calls from ground parties to aircraft typically use telephone numbers on a private telephone network in order to reach the appropriate air-to-ground relay station, which in turn patches the call into the radio call to the aircraft, or v ia a dispatcher in a communication center. Common for these satellite based services is the fact that only a single aircraft is addressed. Further, there is no relation between boundaries controlled by Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs), or any other responsible agency and the coverage of a satellite beam. This is a clear disadvantage over conventional Air Traffic Management (ATM) voice communications performed via VHF radio. Situational awareness is key for the decision making process of controllers and pilots in the next generation airspace system (NEXTGEN). In VHF radio communications this awareness is automatically provided by the shared-media nature of the air waves, thus allowing commands from controllers and the corresponding read-back from pilots to be received by all listeners on a particular frequency simultaneously (propagation delay of the radio signal not considered). In addition, today's sector boundaries (horizontal and vertical) are based on traffic patterns and thus are in accordance with the major air traffic routes, where it never happens, that a single sector requires a handover between two different radio channels (i.e. different physical frequencies). We describe mechanisms that allow combining aircrafts to virtual sector groups independent of satellite beam coverage and introduce communication services by considering technical issues of satellite ba- - sed communications. Aspects of NEXTGEN are addressed such as capacity, performance, and global coverage. ANSPs, FAA, Eurocontrol, and industry are working together to define IP as the next generation common network layer for voice and data communications. EUROCAE Working Group 67 (WG-67) has recently completed its recommendation documents, which are now ready to become ICAO recommendations. To ensure interoperability at the application layer, open standards, a center piece of the internet protocol suite, have been agreed upon by consensus. In addition we elaborate an optimization concept for satellite communication that is in the context of the WG-67 definitions. It takes into account the available data-rate, channel access methods, different end-to-end delay, and more. A translation and optimization entity between the different technologies is introduced providing the WG-67 interface definitions on the ground side and an optimized air-to-ground interface as Link Gateway (LGW). The LGW provides the key communication capabilities to both ends, the ground based voice communications network and the aircraft and handles the interface to the data-link layer (L2) capabilities provided by the data-link via the Ground Earth Station (GES). This allows designing voice communication application services independent of the underlying transport technology. For instance changing or extending the interface at the GES would not affect the Voice Communication System (VCS) or aircraft application, only changes at the LGW are necessary. Another service entity, the Sector Floor Control (SFC) performs floor control and if applicable requests appropriate resources from the GES via the LGW. Finally, we discuss the benefits of future ATM data-link concepts as well as the benefits of integration in a multi-link environment. View full abstract»

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  • Redundancy management and synchronization in avionics communication products

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C3-1 - C3-8
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (335 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes how avionics communication product is being managed in a redundant configuration while performing flight operations. The description covers the architecture of the communication products like CMU (Communication Management Unit), in connection with associated redundancy design requirements; methods for data exchange / synchronization between redundant computers, technique used to identify a failed computer / CMU, notify this failure on-board to the crew, changing the mastership of the computer, methods for recovery of the failed computer. In addition this describes about the number of redundant computers that are required to fulfill the criticality / safety levels of the aircraft operations; how dissimilar architecture concepts could be leveraged to provide protection against common mode failure triggers. Non-failure situations like performance degradation of a computer (operating closer to failure ranges), degradation of redundancy management / synchronization capabilities of a computer should also be considered as factors necessitating the change of mastership. The debugging / built-in testability features would also depend up on the redundancy management architecture used to build the final product. There is a lot of challenge involved is testing the redundancy management, since we require a core functionality (decision of core functionality to be used) to test redundancy. View full abstract»

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  • Beacon code usage statistic

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C4-1 - C4-9
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (803 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Beacon codes are a set of limited National Airspace System (NAS) resource. Currently, the beacon code allocation process is based upon the concept of discreet beacon code assignment to each ARTCC (Air Route Traffic Control Center). This allocation process is done according to the rules published in NBCAP (National Beacon Code Assignment Plan). In this paper, the distribution of codes to the ARTCCs is presented. Also, Host data is analyzed to demonstrate the utilization of codes through the day with varying level of traffic. This analyse is supposed to help identify beacon code bottlenecks in the NAS. There are two kind of bottlenecks studied: (i) ARTCCs which run out of beacon codes most frequently due to high demand/traffic. (ii) ARTCCs where maximum instances of enroute beacon code reassignment occurs due to conflict with another aircraft using the same beacon code. These kinds of beacon code reassignments are undesirable as it increases pilot/controller workload during hand-off. Five (5) months of HOST data from 1st August to 31st December 2007 is analyzed. Individual beacon code utilization statistic for each of the 20 ARTCCs in the CONUS is reported for the 5 month period. On select days for which radar track data is available, the correlation of the code utilization with the traffic level in the corresponding ARTCC is also presented. This analysis provides the foundation of exploiting the inherent structure of NAS traffic to enable a more efficient beacon code assignment, i.e. with fewer beacon code reassignments and more efficient distribution of the Beacon Codes among the ARTCCs. View full abstract»

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  • FIS-B service tiering and recommended avionics processing algorithms

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C7-1 - C7-7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Flight Information System - Broadcast (FIS-B) is one of the services provided by ITT's Surveillance and Broadcast Services System (SBSS) under contract to the FAA. This paper describes the technical details of a tiered service structure which has been implemented to provide a more efficient usage of bandwidth available to the FIS-B service over the UAT RF frequency. The paper begins with a background description of the FIS-B service implementation and the bandwidth constraints of the UAT RF frequency. Succeeding sections describe the FIS-B tiering concepts and motivations, Service Volume design examples, predicted airspace coverage, an implementation and testing schedule, description of the impact to existing UAT avionics/displays, recommended algorithms for airborne processing of FIS-B data, and a summary description of a sample FIS-B data set. View full abstract»

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  • The network security architecture and possible safety benefits of the AeroMACS network

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): D5-1 - D5-9
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    The IEEE 802.16 standard known as the Wireless Metropolitan Area Network (WMAN), which is also commonly referred to as the Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) was initially created as a final mile; point-to-point wireless communication protocol known as 802.16(d), or Fixed WiMAX. Further development of the WiMAX standard created a mobile version which is 802.16(e), or Mobile WiMAX. The aeronautical industry is adopting a version of the Mobile WiMAX 802.16(e)-2009 standard known as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). The goal of AeroMACS is to create a broadband wireless network with the ability to transfer data between fixed and mobile assets on the airport surface. Aircraft, air traffic control (ATC), airlines, ground crews and other stakeholders on the airport surface are examples of the intended end users of the AeroMACS network. The need for such a network has been identified by the joint FAA-EUROCONTROL, Future Communications Study (FCS) as documented in the Communications Operating Concept and Requirements (COCR) for the Future Radio System (FRS). One of the goals of the FCS was to determine a possible medium of communication that can augment the current VHF radio based communication system for aircraft and controllers. Some of the data that will be transported over the AeroMACS network is considered critical to flight operations, depending on the data set and which party is providing the data. The guidelines for the utilization of the AeroMACS network are that the data transmitted over the network is necessary for the safety and regularity of flight. Therefore AeroMACS data transmissions must remain secure and reliable so the information provided by AeroMACS can be trusted by industry stakeholders and the FAA. To ensure that the 802.16(e) standard will be able to provide a secure and reliable means of wireless communication, it is important to analyze the network security protocol. In doing so, we will be able- - to identify any potential weaknesses in the network security protocol, allowing us to find ways of mitigating the risk associated with any weaknesses found. View full abstract»

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  • Use of eram SWIM for NAS system enhancements

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): E1-1 - E1-8
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    The future of information management within the air traffic community is enhanced through sharing of flight data objects, enabled by the System Wide Information Management (SWIM) initiative. SWIM provides the backbone for sharing information throughout the national airspace (NAS), which allows new and existing applications and decision support tools to take advantage of current and consistent data on the SWIM infrastructure, for users to achieve common situational awareness, and systems to make optimum use of the airspace while maintaining safe operations. SWIM-enabling existing and evolving applications and decision support tools lowers the FAA's long-term maintenance costs by transitioning from point-to-point legacy interfaces to use of SWIM for information sharing. The SWIM initiative is aligned with the principles of Service-oriented architecture (SOA). En Route Automation Modernization (ERAM) is operational in Salt Lake and Seattle centers and is proceeding through site deployment for the other 18 centers. One of the significant enhancements to the baseline ERAM is the addition of the first SWIM-enabled service, the Flight Information Service (FIS). The initial version of FIS provides for processing of Traffic Flow Management System (TFMS)-initiated pre-departure re-route amendments. Enhancements to the initial FIS design position it for use by other consumers for an overall life cycle cost savings. The potential uses of ERAM-provided SWIM services are numerous including modernization of existing legacy interfaces (such as Host-ATM Data Distribution System - HADDS and Flight Data Input/Output - FDIO), and the addition of new users as part of development of new applications. One potential new user, the Data Communications Air Traffic Control Facilities Notification (AFN) Accelerated Departure Clearance Service (DCL) involves several systems in achieving the end-to-end thread. FIS can accept and process updates from consumers and publish the existing ERAM flight- - data to authorized users, and address the specific needs of tower systems to automatically send accelerated departure clearances to aircraft. ERAM enhancements can also allow aircraft to log on as FANS aircraft, and then allow a ground station (Tower Data Link Services, TDLS) to establish controller pilot data link communication (CPDLC) sessions to exchange text from air traffic control (ATC) systems to the airplane's cockpit. View full abstract»

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  • US and European interoperability in the aviation domain

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): E3-1 - E3-12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (938 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the work that was done by Boeing Advanced Air Traffic Management (AATM), Boeing Research & Technology Europe (BR&TE), Selex Sistemi Integrati, and Boeing Networked Systems Technology (NST) on the European Commission SWIM-SUIT Interoperability project. This work was sponsored by the European Commission and the US FAA. The goal of this project was the implementation and demonstration of SOA compliant mediation and distribution services for the exchange of live surveillance, flight plans, and flight objects between US and European aviation systems. The mediation service provided transformation between flight data defined by ASDI, ERAM and ICOG schemas. The Surveillance data was represented using FAA and Eurocontrol schemas. In addition to operational capabilities, this work featured the use of an improved distributed messaging technology developed by IBM known as Responsive, Reliable, Real-Time (R3) messaging. R3 messaging provides deterministic Quality of Service (QoS) overlays for use in a federated Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) environment. In addition to the R3 technology, the project featured the use of Mashups. Mashups provide the capability for a user to dynamically combine data and services in user specified configurations, resulting in user defined lightweight network-enabled applications. This paper shows how the mediation, distribution, and messaging services were implemented, example results, and how this work could be leveraged to facilitate US and European interoperability in the aviation domain. View full abstract»

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  • Evolutionary adaptation of ATM systems for SWIM

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): E4-1 - E4-9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (262 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Air Traffic Management (ATM) has embraced the concept of System Wide Information Management (SWIM) as the means to improve data exchange between various applications in different domains such as flight data management, weather and aeronautical information management. Even though SWIM definitions in the US and Europe put emphasis at different aspects in their NextGen and SESAR (Single European Sky ATM Research) programs, the transition phase towards SWIM-enabled systems will pose similar challenges for both program initiatives. Most existing ATM systems have been designed with interfaces for specific data exchanges limited by proprietary data formats and protocols. The SWIM paradigm enables legacy systems - when adapted to new interface technologies - to be connected to new information and service users and thus impacts the life cycle of highly valuable assets. The paper outlines a stepwise approach for adaptation and evolution of systems to enable their connection to a SWIM infrastructure that follows a service-oriented architecture. We show how the models and technology selected impact the engineering of the adapters between existing legacy applications and the target infrastructure. The approach also touches nonfunctional aspects including security. Using two case studies derived from recent work with Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs), we discuss the evolution steps in practical examples and describe successes and pitfalls encountered so far: One case study illustrates how the system interface of the European AIS Database evolves moving from a pure JMS messaging based solution towards a service enabled approach using mainstream web services to guarantee compliance with new interoperability requirements. The second case study describes the design and development of an adapter component that connects a backend system providing VT100 interconnections for input and output streams with a SWIM message bus that completely hides all communication complexity behind - - XML messages. The case studies demonstrate that the system evolution process towards SWIM is driven both bottom up (from the existing applications) and top down (by standardization institutions as well as industry). Information and services provided by existing systems are valuable assets which in course of the system evolution can be maintained when properly encapsulated and hidden behind service façades. Our paper provides an outlook on the evolution towards SWIM from an ANSP's perspective as well as from an industry viewpoint. This decade will see a substantial change of the way ATM systems interact. Our approach should support decisions on how to make existing infrastructure ready for SWIM and when to launch programs to build new generation components that natively f it into the information sharing infrastructure. View full abstract»

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  • Cloud computing in Aircraft Data Network

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): E7-1 - E7-8
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (407 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The introduction of data networks within an aircraft has created several service opportunities for the air carriers. Using the available Internet connectivity, the carriers could offer services like Video-on-Demand (VoD), Voice-over-IP (VoIP), and gaming-on-demand within the aircraft. One of the major road blocks in implementing any of these services is the additional hardware and software requirements. Each service requires dedicated hardware resources to run appropriate software components. It is not possible to accommodate every hardware component within the aircraft due to space, power, and ventilation restrictions. Also, it is economically not viable to install and maintain hardware components for every aircraft. One solution is to use cloud computing. Cloud computing is a recent innovation that is helping the computing industry in distributed computing. Cloud computing allows the organizations to consolidate several hardware resources into one physical device. The Cloud computing concept helps organizations in reducing the overall power consumption and maintenance costs. The cloud computing concept could be extended to the Aircraft Data Network environment with every aircraft subscribing to the cloud resources to run their non mission-critical applications. In this paper, the authors explore the possibility of using cloud services for Aircraft Data Networks. The authors evaluate the performance issues involved with the aircraft mobility and dynamic resource transfer between servers when the aircraft's point-of-attachment changes. The authors predict that using cloud computing concepts would encourage many carriers to offer new services within the aircraft. View full abstract»

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  • A method for identifying connected flights in aviation schedules

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F2-1 - F2-9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a method of grouping flights in airline schedules into tail-connected itineraries. The purpose is to improve the realism of large-scale aviation simulations by allowing them to account for propagated delay, the source of about a third of all delays. The approach presented is that of probabilistic classification with supervised learning. Training data comes from the Airline Service Quality Performance Metrics (ASQP) database (www.bts.org). This data consists of scheduled arrival and departure times, aircraft tail numbers, carrier names, and aircraft types (i.e., Boeing-737) for about a third of all scheduled flights. The classification method described here is by necessity extendable to airports and aircraft types that are not in ASQP. View full abstract»

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  • SystemwideModeler: A fast-time simulation of the NAS

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F4-1 - F4-6
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is a complex network of air transportation resources that serves tens of thousands of flights every day. The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is intended to improve the performance of the NAS. To evaluate the aggregate and network effects of growing demand and NextGen improvements, analysts often use fast-time simulation models of NAS operations. Developed by the MITRE Corporation, systemwideModeler simulates the progress and interactions of flights as they use hundreds of airports and airspace sectors. Capacity-constrained resources such as airports or en route sectors anticipate congestion and react by constraining when and how flights use them. Constraints are respected via delay absorption, rerouting, airframe reassignment, and cancellations. Resource models can be summoned as needed to best represent the scenario of interest. This paper describes the use and design of systemwideModeler, explains how key component models work to represent airport congestion management, en route congestion management, and fleet management, and identifies ongoing research activities. View full abstract»

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  • Building a human-in-the-loop simulation of market-based traffic flow management

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F5-1 - F5-8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (783 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations can be invaluable in the study of traffic flow management concepts. However, the design and execution of HITL experiments is often very challenging and risk-prone. In our market-based Traffic Flow Management (TFM) research, we develop an approach to developing HITL simulations that leads to effective experiments that yield great results, while reducing programmatic risk. The software used for the HITL experiment is developed using the Probabilistic NAS Platform (PNP). The architecture of PNP allows software clients, representing various National Airspace System (NAS) elements, to interact with real-world NAS data provided by the PNP server. The architecture of PNP allows clients to be distributed across a network, such as the Internet. This flexibility allows HITL study participants to be located anywhere in the world, provided Internet access is available. This was a requirement for our simulation, in which participants would be participating from various locations. In addition to software risk, we also tackle user acceptance challenges. HITL experiment results can be detrimentally skewed by participants who are not fully engaged in the simulation. In this study, we incorporate a feedback solicitation process into our project planning mechanism. The development of HITL simulations, while challenging and risk-prone, can provide insights that cannot be derived from automated, fast-time simulations. The approach discussed here can lead to the rapid development of robust software that engages users and collection of useful results. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive agents in NAS-wide simulations: A case-study of CTOP and SWIM

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F6-1 - F6-13
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (635 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To support the development and evaluation of NextGen/SESAR concepts-of-operations and technologies, NAS-wide simulations and analysis methodologies are required to evaluate the feasibility and estimate the NAS-wide benefits. Of particular importance is the evaluation of unintended consequences that have historically been a roadblock to innovation in the NAS. This paper describes an analysis of adaptive airline behavior for flightplan route selection in the presence of Collaborative Trajectory Options Program (CTOP) and System Wide Information Management (SWIM). The results of analysis of simulation of 60,000 flight per day for 80 days shows that: (i) flightplan route selection reaches a system-wide equilibrium, (ii) the equilibrium state yields system-wide performance benefits, (iii) the equilibrium is achieved in 18 days, (iv) inaccurate and delayed information have no impact on system-wide performance but require additional days to achieve equilibrium, and (v) global (i.e. all airline) information does not improve individual airline route selection. The implications of these results on NextGen planning are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Agentfly: NAS-wide simulation framework integrating algorithms for automated collision avoidance

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F7-1 - F7-11
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (421 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    AgentFly is a software prototype providing a distributed architecture for large-scale NAS-wide simulation implemented as a multi-agent system. AgentFly is implemented on top of the Aglobe platform which is both an implementation framework and a runtime engine for custom agents. It was selected over possible alternatives (e.g. JADE) for its outstanding performance and scalability supporting seamless interaction among heterogeneous software, hardware and human actors. AgentFly system has been developed for over five years. It was initially built f or simulation-based validation and comparison of various approaches for autonomous collision avoidance algorithms adopting the free-flight concept. Later, AgentFly has been extended with high-level control algorithms providing tactical control - i.e. coordination of several autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). The same agents and algorithms integrated in AgentFly simulation are also deployed on real UAV platforms. Besides this UAV-related application, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) supports the application of the AgentFly system for simulation and evaluation of the future civilian air-traffic management system. AgentFly has been extended with high-fidelity computational models of civilian airplanes and a parallelization concept integrating dynamic load-balancing. The parallelized approach of AgentFly has been validated in simulation using data of a full civilian air-traffic touching NAS. Nowadays, AgentFly is being extended so that it provides a simulation of ATC functions for the NEXTGEN concept validation. There are being integrated ATC & NAS automation agents which are used to simulate human operation in ATM. View full abstract»

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  • A fully-dynamic network flow model of the NAS

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F8-1 - F8-8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (487 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a fully-dynamic multi-commodity Network Flow Model (NetFM) representation of the National Airspace System (NAS). NetFM is a high-level aggregate model incorporating time-varying demand and capacity profiles to define the optimal routing and scheduling of all NAS traffic within a matter of minutes. NetFM routing solutions are not limited to a set of user-inputted route options. Rather, spatial-temporal flight paths are computed through a hexagonal network of nodes and arcs over successive time steps. We present the NetFM formulation. NetFM results include a set of diagnostics which show predicted capacity, traffic flow patterns, and regions where additional capacity would be most beneficial. These diagnostic results may offer improved situational awareness and decision support to Traffic Flow Management (TFM) planners. NetFM capabilities also enable a laboratory in which TFM researchers can study advanced TFM concepts such as integrated airspace flow and ground delay programs. View full abstract»

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