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Pervasive Computing and Communications Workshops (PERCOM Workshops), 2011 IEEE International Conference on

Date 21-25 March 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 150
  • [Copyright notice]

    Page(s): i
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): ii - xv
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  • Message from the general chairs

    Page(s): xvi
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  • Message from the workshops chairs

    Page(s): xvii
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  • IQ2S'11: The third International Workshop on Information Quality and Quality of Service for Pervasive Computing - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xviii - xix
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  • MUCS 2011: 8th IEEE International Workshop on Managing Ubiquitous Communications and Services - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xx - xxii
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  • PerCoSC 2011: 1st IEEE PerCom Workshop on Pervasive Communities and Service Clouds - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxiii - xxiv
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  • PerSeNS 2011: Seventh IEEE International Workshop on Sensor Networks and Systems for Pervasive Computing - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxv - xxvi
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  • PERWARE 2011: 8th IEEE international workshop on middleware and system support for pervasive computing - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxvii - xxviii
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  • SESOC 2011: 3rd International Workshop on Security and Social Networking - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxix - xxx
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  • PerCom 2011 demos: PerCom 2011 demos - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxi
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  • WIP of PerCom 2011: Work in Progress workshop at PerCom 2011 - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxii
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  • PerCom 2011 PhD Forum: Fourth annual PhD Forum on pervasive computing and communications - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxiii
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  • CoMoRea 2011: 8th IEEE workshop on Context Modeling and Reasoning - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxiv - xxxv
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  • MP2P 2011: The 7th international workshop on mobile peer-to-peer computing - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxvi - xxxvii
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  • PerCol 2011: Second IEEE workshop on pervasive collaboration and social networking - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxviii
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  • PerEL 2011: 7th IEEE International Workshop on PervasivE Learning, Life, and Leisure - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xxxix - xl
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  • PWN 2011: Seventh IEEE PerCom Workshop on Pervasive Wireless Networking - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xli
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  • SmartE 2011: Smart environments to enhance health care - committees and welcome

    Page(s): xlii
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  • Keynote: Information Assurance in sensor networks

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (61 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Summary form only given. Information Assurance (IA) grew out of the field of computer network security. However, IA is a much broader term than network security and relates to the managing of the risks associated with the use, processing, storage, and transmission of information. The most basic model of IA relies on three properties: confidentiality, integrity, and availability, thus it is often referred to as the CIA model. The wide consensus is that the commonly assumed attributes of sensor nodes, such as low energy, low computational power, unattended operation, and wireless connectivity are considered challenges in implementing IA in sensor networks. Similarly, the broad range of applications, which results in broad range of possibly heterogeneous information modalities, makes the problem even more complex. Though, the relatively constant membership of sensor networks is usually perceived as an advantage. Similarly, the typical massive deployment of nodes can be exploited in the design of IA protocols. In this talk, I will describe an extension of the CIA model and its application to sensor networks. In particular, I will discuss a number of approaches to support IA in sensor networks. View full abstract»

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  • Quality-of-information aware networking for tactical military networks

    Page(s): 2 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (609 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In tactical military networks, decisions must often be made quickly based on information at hand. It is a challenge to provide decision makers with a notion of the quality of the information they have, or to provide a method by which decision makers can specify a required quality of information. It is a further challenge to honor requests for a required quality of information when selecting information sources, transporting information through a highly-dynamic network, and perhaps performing processing on that information. In this paper we motivate the need for a general, but formal, definition of quality-of-information so that this metric may be specified and potentially optimized by algorithms that operate a tactical network. Furthermore, we define a new notion, the operational information content capacity, to capture the amount and quality of information that a network can deliver. View full abstract»

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  • QoI-aware energy management for wireless sensor networks

    Page(s): 8 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (466 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose an efficient energy-management framework in wireless sensor networks (WSNs) to address the fundamental research challenge imposed by both the maintenance of the energy supply and the support of the quality-of-information (QoI) requirements. By quantifying the QoI benefit the tasks receive in relation to the level of QoI they request as the QoI satisfaction index), we propose a QoI-aware energy-management scheme to distributedly decide the participating state of each sensor. Specifically, by using the mathematical framework of the Gur Game, we propose a novel pay-off structure taking into account the QoI and the energy consumption. We finally evaluate the proposed scheme under an event occurrence detection scenario, where the proposed scheme successfully guarantees less than 7% QoI outage, saves 80% of the energy reserve if compared with the lower bound solution, and achieves the suboptimum with only 4% gap if compared with optimal solution. View full abstract»

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  • Fidelity-based continuous query introspection and adaptation

    Page(s): 14 - 19
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    In this paper, we address the fidelity of information collected from distributed, interactive, pervasive computing environments. Queries in these dynamic networks come in two forms: snapshot queries and continuous queries. The former executes through the network and returns values that satisfy the query criteria at a particular instant in time. The latter expects a result that is updated over time to reflect changes in the system. The fidelity, or quality, of the results of these queries can be significantly impacted by the unpredictability of the dynamic network; as the query is distributed and executed, changes that occur due to network and environmental dynamics can cause the query to miss potential results or to report inconsistent information. Our previous work has shown how we can provide semantically meaningful statements about the fidelity, or quality, of the result of a snapshot query in a dynamic networked environment. In this paper, we demonstrate how this fidelity can also be used to adapt a continuous query's processing to make its execution best match the conditions in the underlying dynamic environment. View full abstract»

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  • Market mechanisms for Value of Information driven resource allocation in Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 20 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (313 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper examines the possible uses of different market mechanisms for resource allocation at different levels of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) architecture. The goal is to maximize the Value of Information (VoI) for WSN users. We discuss three different levels of WSN architecture. The lowest level focuses on individual nodes and their basic functions of sensing and routing. We give an example showing how the use of auctions at individual nodes can help to efficiently perform these functions. The middle level focuses on services that are abstractions of applications running on sensors. Complex applications are composed automatically from basic ones. We discuss the use of switch options to address some of the challenges arising in such dynamic service composition. Finally, we consider the highest level - network deployment and sharing - and conjecture that options may be valuable in creating proper incentives for rational deployment and sharing of WSNs. View full abstract»

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  • Video entity resolution: Applying ER techniques for Smart Video Surveillance

    Page(s): 26 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (558 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smart Video Surveillance (SVS) applications enhance situational awareness by allowing domain analysts to focus on the events of higher priority. This in turn leads to improved decision making, allows for better resource management, and helps to reduce information overload. SVS approaches operate by trying to extract and interpret higher “semantic” level events that occur in video. On of the key challenges of Smart Video Surveillance is that of person identification where the task is for each subject that occur in a video shot to identify the person it corresponds to. The problem of person identification is very complex in the resource constrained environments where transmission delay, bandwidth restriction, and packet loss may prevent the capture of high quality data. In this paper we connect the problem of person identification in video data with the problem of entity resolution that is common in textual data. Specifically, we show how the PI problem can be successfully resolved using a graph-based entity resolution framework called RelDC that leverages relationships among various entities for disambiguation. We apply the proposed solution to a dataset consisting of several weeks of surveillance videos. The results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach even with low quality video data. View full abstract»

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