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Rural Electric Power Conference (REPC), 2011 IEEE

Date 10-13 April 2011

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): i - xiv
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  • Electric power and energy engineering education in USA: A status report, issues and challenges

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): A1-1 - A1-6
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (645 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to promote power and energy engineering education and career opportunities and to meet the future needs and expectations of the power and energy industry in the 21st century, the curriculum and course contents must be very carefully designed and delivered. Preparing future generation of electric power and energy systems engineers is different than it was in the past and is a challenging task at best. This paper addresses the status of the undergraduate and graduate level education in power engineering in USA and provides some insight to the future needs. View full abstract»

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  • Medium-voltage arc flash in open air and padmounted equipment

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): A2-1 - A2-9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5634 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Arc flash is an important consideration for personnel safety. This paper shows test results for overhead arc flash scenarios and arc flash in a padmounted switch. Both scenarios result in more incident energy than expected. For overhead arc scenarios, longer arc lengths are considered when analyzing arc flash. For the padmounted switch, an equation is developed to help coordinate protective clothing with minimum approach distances and upstream protective relaying. View full abstract»

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  • Grounding considerations for large kVA pad-mount transformers

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): A3-1 - A3-4
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Utilities in the United States and Canada have done extensive analysis of the ground grid design for substations in order to limit step and touch potentials to safe values; however, few have analyzed the potential hazard and designed grounding systems for pad-mount transformers. Since the kVA size and voltage ratings of pad-mounts have increased and the exterior of these facilities are accessible not only to qualified electric utility workers but also the general public, there is a need to analyze and properly design and construct grounding systems which will render these facilities safe for switching and fault conditions. This paper analyzes and develops the design for several different pad-mount transformer voltages and kVA sizes through 5,000kVA. View full abstract»

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  • Economics of a small renewable generation system

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): A4-1 - A4-6
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    Many factors can affect the economics of a small grid connected renewable energy generation system. They range from determining a site, maintenance, project life and financing. This paper studies all of those factors and how they affect the economics for small renewable generation systems 50 kW and below. It will also provide charts on expected financial outcomes based on those factors, using a financial calculator that was created in Microsoft Excel. The data used in this paper was compiled from Cass County Electric Cooperative Inc's (CCEC's) customers that have installed these generation systems connected at 240 volts to CCEC's distribution system. View full abstract»

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  • Rural energy security using autonomous micro-turbine smart grids

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B1-1 - B1-5
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (851 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Rural energy security is a topic of great importance, not only in the USA, but in many regions of the world. In many places, there is no grid. We propose the development of autonomous smart grids which can be used in any region without the existence of a centralized grid. The grids can be portable and can support a small population, as well as, scaling to larger one. View full abstract»

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  • Distribution system analysis and the future Smart Grid

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B2-1 - B2-8
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The “Smart Grid” refers to various efforts to modernize the power grid through the application of alternate sources of energy and intelligent devices. The present national interest in Smart Grid applications has generated many questions concerning the role of distribution engineering in the future. What features do utility engineers need in distribution system analysis tools to support the future Smart Grid? This paper will discuss some relevant EPRI research in this area that focuses on selected issues related to Smart Grid analysis relevant to rural utilities. The essential characteristics of distribution system analysis tools to support analysis of these issues are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Real time evaluation and operation of the smart grid using game theory

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B3-1 - B3-6
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (540 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Utilities are implementing smart grid technology on their electric grids in an effort to receive more information and have more control of their electric grid. As a result, the utilities are able to take advantage of this new technology in the form of load reduction, reliability, and automations of the utility's grid. With the advent of Automated Meter Infrastructure (AMI), Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), Digital Relays, Engineering and Analysis software (EA), Power Quality meters (PQ) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS), utilities can receive more information about the power system than has been available in the past. However, with most utilities the integration of all the information available has not become a reality. This may be due to time or the cost of each piece of infrastructure and the implementation of integrating them into a single network of information. The purpose of this paper is to present a method for evaluating a fully automated electric grid in real time and finding potential problem areas or weak points within the electric grid by using the game theory principles of decision trees and "The Prisoner's Dilemma" to evaluate the best possible actions to implement within the electric grid to avoid potential problems before they happen. The process uses the output of an EA that is using real time information from the grid and calculating information such as voltage drops, current, load flow, transformers, substations, sectionalizing and switching. The algorithm allows for each utility to define their acceptable grid operating limits and this information is used by the algorithm to analyze the output of the EA. Output from the segments in the EA that are found to be outside the utility's defined grid operating limits are then sent to the part of the algorithm that uses the game theory principles to evaluate the information and look at the possible solutions and tradeoffs affecting the electric grid if those solutions are imple mented. This part of the algorithm then picks the best possible solution to implement within the electric grid to avoid a potential outage, system failure or reliability issue. View full abstract»

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  • Report on real-time grid analysis pilots

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B4-1 - B4-7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In August, 2010, Milsoft began its first pilot study of real-time grid analysis at Owen Electric in Kentucky. In this pilot, the IT requirements of the server platform necessary to acquire AMR data and SCADA in real-time was tested and the use of load allocation/load flow converted to perform automatically in real-time was investigated. While this was a simple circuit with 60 meters total, the results were successful in proving that real-time distribution analysis is possible. The accuracy of results is still under study; however, the ability to perform these studies automatically in real-time was proven. Milsoft will attempt to expand this study, as well as begin additional pilots at South Plains Electric in Texas and Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative (MVEC) in Minnesota, prior to the 2011 conference. This paper will explain the methods used and report on progress. Additional results available at the time of the 2011 conference will be included in the presentation. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated volt/VAR control on rural distribution systems

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B5-1 - B5-9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (516 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The integration of smart grid technologies along with improved feeder monitoring capabilities have led to a renewed focus on voltage and reactive power control on power distribution systems. Economic and operational benefits result from effectively managing the voltage profile and feeder power factor. While monitoring, control, and communications technologies are rapidly evolving, the basic tools and equipment - voltage regulators, shunt capacitors, and engineering changes such as load balancing and reconductoring - are basically the same. The task for the distribution engineer is to select the best mix of solutions based on economic life cycle benefits. For long, voltage constrained rural circuits this is challenging, but recent analyses have proven the viability of maintaining a flat voltage profile on most circuit configurations. This paper addresses the essential tools and techniques associated with managing the distribution voltage profile and reactive power flow to achieve economic and operational benefits. Economic analysis methods used to evaluate the optimum mix of equipment and engineering changes will be reviewed, along with the special challenges of implementing volt/VAR control on rural distribution feeders. View full abstract»

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  • Expansion of distribution automation with communicating faulted circuit indicators

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): B6-1 - B6-6
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    United Cooperative Services has a long history of incorporating distribution automation into its electric utility distribution operations. With the advent of new communications options and improved Faulted Circuit Indicator technology, United has embarked on an expansion of its distribution automation plans to incorporate communicating Faulted Circuit Indicators to improve system reliability. View full abstract»

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  • Using the IEEE Comprehensive Test Feeder

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C1-1 - C1-7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (202 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The IEEE Comprehensive Test Feeder was presented at the 2010 IEEE Transmission and Distribution Conference. [1] The purpose of this test feeder was to present the data for a radial distribution feeder that will require the modeling of all possible overhead and underground lines, voltage regulator connections and transformer connections. The data for the feeder can be found at the IEEE PES website. [2] This paper will demonstrate how the test feeder can be used to assist the distribution engineer in making decisions regarding the design of new or the upgrading of existing feeders. Particular attention will be paid to the many possible choices of three-phase transformer banks. View full abstract»

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  • High-speed communication-assisted tripping and sectionalizing for distribution systems

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C2-1 - C2-6
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    The recent advent of Smart Grid has given rise to advances in communication systems for distribution systems. Modern numerical overcurrent relays have the technology available to utilize these communication channels for both high speed-assisted tripping and sectionalizing. Assisted tripping and sectionalizing allows the utility to operate their distribution system in a network as opposed to radial feeders. A networked system is much more reliable and customers experience fewer outages since there are multiple sources readily available. Assisted tripping and sectionalizing quickly isolates the fault and eliminates the need for long clearing times and complex coordination typically associated with classical time overcurrent protection. This paper demonstrates how to apply communication-assisted tripping and sectionalizing, taking into account specific considerations for distribution systems not necessary for transmission applications-for example, a feeder with distributed generation connected. Several detailed examples are presented as to how to implement these schemes for typical distribution systems. This paper also gives specific settings and operational details of these schemes. Additionally, a review of the operational history highlights the impact that these schemes have on the reliability of the utility distribution network. View full abstract»

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  • Advanced distribution reclosing using wireless communications

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C3-1 - C3-7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A key smart grid solution that affects quality of electric service to rural electric cooperative customers is automatic distribution reclosing. Distribution reclosers offer rural electric cooperatives the benefit of isolating faults and minimizing the number of effected customers during a fault condition. Over the years, sequence coordination between upstream and downstream reclosers has for trip coordination. This paper will discuss using recloser controls with Ethernet communications and 900 Mhz Ethernet radios to efficiently communicate to each other using peer-to-peer communications. Smart trip coordination and fault isolation will be discussed using this available communication technology. View full abstract»

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  • Distribution automation systems with advanced features

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C4-1 - C4-15
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (990 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper examines the use of wide-area distribution automation (DA) systems in electric power distribution systems. The number of DA systems installed on an annual basis is increasing. Many of these projects encompass a large area of a distribution system. Wide-area DA holds the promise of further increasing distribution system reliability. This paper presents wide-area DA strategies and discusses the potential impact on system operation. The paper also looks at the effects of communications outages on the performance of DA systems. Backup solutions are discussed that allow the DA system to function when a communications link fails. Topics covered in this paper include: · An overview of wide-area DA. This overview presents the objectives and basic operating principles of automatic circuit reconfiguration in recovering from electrical faults. Advanced features, such as splitting feeder loads between multiple sources when a feeder is reconfigured and transferring load off of a feeder that was previously reconfigured if an overload develops, are also covered. · The use of multiple distribution automation controllers (DACs) for automating large areas of a power system. · The impact on system operation practices. This portion of the paper discusses how the operation of the distribution system is affected by the presence of wide-area DA systems. · The use of backup logic to allow reconfiguration of the distribution system after an outage when a communications link is down. View full abstract»

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  • Implementing fast configurable bolt-on self-healing technology for distribution management systems

    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): C5-1 - C5-9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (803 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Implementation of an automation system to meet specific improvement goals for System Average Interruption Duration Index (SAIDI) is discussed. Self-healing automation systems that use sensors, controls, and real-time distribution data to isolate faults and reconfigure feeders to minimize service disruption are an integral part of any Smart Grid vision. These automation solutions work best when they preserve standard protection schemes and operating procedures, tie together diverse intelligent electronic devices (IED) and protocols, and allow non-scripted configuration and addition of new devices, as well as integration with DMS systems. View full abstract»

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